Dec 03, 2021  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

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Nursing

  
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    NUR 439 Health Care Issues, Policy, and Economics

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to examine the ethical, legal, political, and economic issues that impact health care and nursing practice. Analysis of national and international organizational structures and trends will be the primary focus. The role of the nurse as consumer and activist within the human-environmental field will be explored. Three lecture hours per week. This is a required course for RN-BSN students.
  
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    NUR 440A Pathophysiology

    4 Credit(s)
    The course explores the open system of unitary human beings concerned with disruptions in structure and function, changes in pattern and organization, and manifestations of these changes and disruptions. Concepts to be covered are cellular dynamics, fluid and electrolyte, acid-base patterns, principles of immunology, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, neurologic, metabolic, intestinal, and musculoskeletal human response patterns. In addition, pharmacological and nutritional patterns will be integrated with each human response pattern.. Four lecture hours per week. Required of students in the RN to BSN Program and second degree accelerated programs. Not open to students who have taken NUR440. Prerequisites: BIO 200  and BIO 201  or permission of Instructor.
  
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    NUR 444A Art and Science of Nursing X: Management and Leadership in Nursing

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to involve the experienced nurse in exploring management and leadership theory and process within the health care delivery system. Concepts related to change, negotiation, and decision-making will be explored. Strategies addressing ethical, legal, political, and fiscal issues within the organizational structure will also be examined. Three lecture hours per week. Restricted Admission. Required of students in the RN to BSN Program. Offered only through the Evening Division. Prerequisites: NUR 360A , NUR 361A , NUR 439  & NUR 440A . Co-requisites: NUR 409  & NUR 445A .
  
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    NUR 445A Art and Science of Nursing XI: Management and Leadership in Nursing Practicum

    4 Credit(s)
    This course will focus on the leadership and management role of the professional nurse within human-environmental fields in a variety of health care settings. Six hours of clinical experience and one hour of clinical seminar is required each week to meet the course objectives. Theoretical concepts derived from the components of the curriculum enhance the professional development of the student. Clinical placement is arranged through collaboration with student and faculty to meet course requirements. Required of students in the RN to BSN Program. Restricted Admission. Offered only through the Evening Division. Prerequisites: NUR 360A , NUR 361A , NUR 439  & NUR 440A . Co-requisites: NUR 409  & NUR 444A .
  
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    NUR 446 Art and Science of Nursing XII

    3 Credit(s)
    The concept of public health nursing will be explored through the study of human-environment field interactions regarding aggregate populations found in diverse public health settings. The nurse will focus on health promotion and examine the ethical, legal, political and economic issues surrounding health care. Leadership and management strategies will be used in the continued development of the nurse as manager. Three lecture hours per week. Restricted Admission. Required of students in the RN to BSN Program. Offered only through the Evening Division. Prerequisites: NUR 360A , NUR 361A , NUR 440A  & NUR 441. Co-requisites: NUR 409  & NUR 447 .
  
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    NUR 447 Art & Science of Nursing XIII

    4 Credit(s)
    Students will function in the role of the professional nurse within the human-environmental fields in the public health setting. Theoretical concepts derived from the didactic components of the curriculum enhance the professional development of the student. Clinical placement is made with advisement and in concurrence with the student’s interest and course requirements. Six hours clinical experience and one hour of clinical seminar per week. Restricted admission. Required of students in the RN to BSN Program. Offered only through the Evening Division. Prerequisites: NUR 360A , NUR 361A , NUR 439  and NUR 440A . Co-requisites: NUR 409  and NUR 446 .
  
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    NUR 450 Nursing Informatics

    3 Credit(s)
    The concept of nursing informatics will be explored through the integration of nursing science, computer science, and information science to manage and communicate data, information, and knowledge in nursing practice.  The nurse will focus on improving the health of populations, communities, families, and individuals by optimizing management systems and communication.  Three lecture hours per week.  This is a required course for RN-BSN students. Prerequisites: MA Registered Nurse License.
  
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    NUR 460 Health Assessment Across the Lifespan

    5 Credit(s)
    This course will provide students with a lecture and a laboratory-based introduction to the use of skills in the health assessment of diverse clients. Additional topics will be integrated into the course including nursing process, documentation of normal/abnormal findings, and critical thinking skills. Four lecture hours and nine laboratory hours each week for Summer Session I. Open only to and required of students enrolled in the Accelerated Second Degree BSN Program. Co-requisite: NUR 461 .
  
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    NUR 461 Nursing Care of the Adult and Aging Population I

    4 Credit(s)
    This course provides students with lecture and laboratory-based introduction to and application of nursing skills in clinical settings. Topics will include nursing process, evidence-based practice, critical thinking, psychosocial and physiological needs, and patient safety. Four lecture hours and twelve laboratory/clinical hours per week during Summer Session I. Open only to and required of student enrolled in the Accelerated Second Degree BSN Program. Co-requisite: NUR 460 .
  
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    NUR 462 Explorations of the Professional Nursing Role

    2 Credit(s)
    This course provides a forum for students to explore and examine issues and expectations affecting nursing today and in the future. Students will explore the historical development of nursing and develop an awareness of contemporary political economic, social and cultural issues affecting professional nursing. Issues will be explored through assigned readings, clinical journals, and group presentations. Two lecture hours per week during Summer Session II. Open only to and required of students enrolled in the Accelerated Second Degree BSN Program. Prerequisites:NUR 460 , NUR 461 .
    Co-requisite: NUR 463 .
  
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    NUR 463 Mental Health Care Across the Life Span

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides key theories with existing knowledge in the mental health fields and prepares students to research, understand, critically analyze and apply this knowledge to nursing practice. Four lecture and six clinical hours each week over Summer II. Open only to and required of students enrolled in the Accelerated Second Degree BSN Program. Prerequisites: NUR 460 , NUR 461 . Co-requisite: NUR 462 .
  
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    NUR 464 Nursing Care for the Adult and Aging Population II

    12 Credit(s)
    This course provides content related to the knowledge and skills essential for providing care to adults throughout the life process with a variety of acute and long term disruption in pattern manifestations. The focus will be on the assessment and management of client care in a variety of settings. Seven lecture hours and fifteen clinical hours each week. Open only to and required of students enrolled in the Accelerated Second Degree BSN Program. Prerequisites: NUR 460 , NUR 461 , NUR 462 , NUR 463 . Co-requisite: NUR 465 .
  
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    NUR 465 Pharmacology in Nursing Practice

    3 Credit(s)
    This course examines the pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacotherapeutics of drug therapy in the general and specialty client populations. Disease prevention, treatment, and client response will be explored using the nursing process. Social cultural, and ethical/legal factors affecting pharmacologic therapy will also be discusses. Three lecture hours each week. Open only to and required by students enrolled in the Accelerated Second Degree BSN program. Prerequisites: NUR 460 , NUR 461 , NUR 462 , NUR 463 . Co-requisite: NUR 464 .
  
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    NUR 466 Population Health and Community Nursing

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides comprehensive instruction on special topics in populations health nursing. It augments knowledge, skills, and competencies for practice within community health settings. Topics will include prevention and health promotion strategies directed toward population aggregates. Four lecture hours and six clinical hours per week for one quarter. Open only to and required of students enrolled in the Accelerated Second Degree BSN Program. Prerequisites: NUR 460 , NUR 461 ,NUR 462 , NUR 463 , NUR 464 , NUR 465 . Co-requisite: NUR 409 .
  
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    NUR 467 Nursing Care of the Adult and Aging Population III

    3 Credit(s)
    This course emphasizes theory related to the nursing care of patients and families faced with complex pathophysiological stressors. Sub-contexts of this course include safety, nutrition, cultural and spiritual diversity, end of life care, legal and ethical issues, and pharmacology. Students will examine the nursing process and clinical reasoning as it relates to the nursing care of individuals with complex medical conditions. Six lecture hours per week for one quarter. Open only to and required of student enrolled in the Accelerated Second Degree BSN Program.
    Prerequisites: NUR 460 , NUR 461 ,NUR 462 , NUR 463 , NUR 464 , NUR 465 . Co-requisite: NUR 409 .
  
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    NUR 468 Women’s Health Care Through the Life Span

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will explore multiple conditions and theoretical principles to understand and care for the childbearing woman and neonate. Biopsychosocial factors influencing the health of women and the neonate are examined. Four lecture hours and six clinical hours per week for one quarter. Open only to and required of students enrolled in the Accelerated Second Degree BSN Program.
    Prerequisites: NUR 460 , NUR 461 , NUR 462 , NUR 463 , NUR 464 , NUR 465 . Co-requisites: NUR 409 , NUR 466  or NUR 467 .
  
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    NUR 469 Health Care of Children

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will explore multiple conditions and theoretical principles to understand and care for children from one month through adolescence. Biopsychosocial factors influencing the health of children and families are examined. Four lecture hours and six clinical hours each week for one quarter. Open only to and required of students enrolled in the Accelerated Second Degree BSN Program.
    Prerequisites: NUR 460 , NUR 461 , NUR 462 , NUR 463 , NUR 464 , NUR 465 . Co-requisite: NUR 409 .
  
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    NUR 500 Directed Study in Nursing

    1-12 Credit(s)
    Directed Study in Nursing
     
  
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    NUR 601H Honors Program: Nursing Research I

    3 Credit(s)
    This course offers an introduction to research methods and critical analysis of existing nursing research. Three lecture hours per week and field trips as necessary. Students will submit a proposal for a research project and complete institutional review process prior to or during NUR 602H . Open only to Nursing students in the Honors Program. Taken in lieu of NUR 409 . Co-requisite: MAT 147  or equivalent.
  
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    NUR 602H Honors Program: Nursing Research II: Research Practicum

    3 Credit(s)
    The focus of the research practicum will be to conduct a research project, based on the proposal approved during NUR 601H . Students take the lead role in writing the thesis with support from a faculty sponsor. Routine meetings with the faculty sponsor for discussions and feedback. Process, summary and findings of the thesis will be shared with students in the IDS Honors Seminar the same semester.  Students will prepare an abstract and a poster or oral presentation (2) for a public, collegiate or national forum. Hours arranged with faculty. Open only to Senior Nursing students in the Honors Program.  Prerequisite: NUR 601H  and W-II course.

Occupational Therapy

  
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    OCT 247 Statistics for the Healthcare Professional

    3 Credit(s) QR
    This introductory course provides the students with statistical concepts and models used to analyzing health care research and data. Students will explore statistical methods for establishing correlations, interpreting trends, conducting time series analysis, and predictions. Probability and sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, effect size, and statistical power will be examined from a theoretic perspective. Students will be prepared to critically examine research articles and utilize evidence based practice. Required for the BHS major.
  
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    OCT 395 Concepts of Information Literacy for Health Care Professionals

    2 Credit(s)
    Students in this hybrid course will investigate and integrate knowledge pertaining to multifaceted aspects of information literacy. The development of information literacy skills lays the foundation for improved research strategies and lifelong intellectual growth. The skills acquired will be integrated into course assignments throughout the OT curriculum. Limited to OCT majors. Two lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: All OT flow sheet prerequisites. Co-requisities: OCT 400N , and OCT 401 , and OCT 402 , and OCT 403 .
  
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    OCT 400N Pathways for Occupational Therapy Practice

    2 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to transition students from the role of OTA to role of OTR. Students will understand the dynamics of the term “occupation” and explore the relationship that exists between occupation, person and environment. The history of occupational therapy, occupational therapy theoretical frameworks, and philosophical foundations of the profession will be emphasized. Concepts introduced will include clinical reasoning, evidence-based and client-centered practice, professional organizations, and documents pertaining to professional development. . Students will be expected to utilize self-directed and reflective inquiry. Limited to OCT majors. Two lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for OCT400. Prerequisites: All core and support courses must be completed before beginning professional level coursework. Co-requisites: OCT 395  and OCT 401 .
  
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    OCT 401 Effective Documentation in OT Practice

    2 Credit(s)
    This is a web-based course that provides the student with an understanding of documentation regulations and reimbursement systems in the healthcare industry that include Medicare, Medicaid, fee-for-service, capitation, workers’ compensation and contractual care. Issues in reimbursement and strategies for overcoming challenges of third party payers in occupational therapy settings will be covered. All students will successfully complete an online documentation competency test. Limited to OCT majors. Prerequisite: Completion of all core and support courses. Co-requisite: OCT400 or OCT 400N .
  
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    OCT 402 Clinical Reasoning & Professional Judgement

    2 Credit(s)
    This course will explore the components of clinical reasoning and students will develop an appreciation and understanding of the process involved in making sound and ethical client-care decisions related to occupational therapy practice. Contributions made by a variety of theorists will be addressed with emphasis placed on formulating skills that enable students to comprehend vital connections interwoven with the professional decision-making process and in one’s own professional development. Two lecture hours per week. Limited to OCT majors. Prerequisite: OCT400 or OCT 400N . Co-requisite: OCT 403 .
  
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    OCT 403 OT Promotion, Education & Media

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will expose students to a variety of technological and non-technological methods and media and to teaching and learning styles, methods and approaches. Students will explore their own learning style, understanding and demonstrate a variety of presentation options and appreciate the value of technology in application to occupational therapy practice. Analysis of activities and it’s application to the OT Practice Framework: Domain & Process will promote understanding and appreciation of human occupation from multiple learning perspectives. Two hours of lecture, one hour of lab per week. Limited to OCT majors. Prerequisites: OCT400 or OCT 400N , OCT 401 . Co-requisite: OCT 402 .
  
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    OCT 404 Perceptual and Cognitive Disabilities

    3 Credit(s)
    This course examines occupational theory and treatment techniques associated with children and adults with cognitive-perceptual deficits. Deficits including dyspraxia, visuospatial and visuoconstructive disorders, sensory defensiveness, vestibular problems, and bilateral integration and sequencing problems will be discussed. Theories of brain function, hemispheric specialization, and cognitive-perceptual-motor treatment will be explored. Assessment and remediation strategies for constructional disabilities, sensory integration dysfunction, unilateral neglect and dyspraxia will be integrated. Three lecture hours per week. Limited to OCT majors. Prerequisites: OCT400 or OCT 400N , OCT 401 , OCT 402  and OCT 403 . Co-requisites: OCT 406 , OCT 408 .
  
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    OCT 406 Conditions and Pathologies

    2 Credit(s)
    This course will provide occupational therapy students with a comprehensive overview of medical conditions and pathologies associated with clients across the life span. Students will develop a solid foundation for discerning multiple medical, psychological, social, environmental and sensory conditions or disease processes. Problem identification techniques, comprehension of medical conditions, concepts and terminology will be addressed from a variety of practice venues. Two lecture hours per week. Limited to OCT majors. Prerequisites: OCT 395 , OCT 400N , OCT 401 , OCT 402  and OCT 403 . Co-requisites: OCT 404 , OCT 408 .
  
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    OCT 407N OT Analysis and Intervention I

    4 Credit(s)
    This course will utilize a variety of assessment tools for problem identification, interpretation, planning and implementation of intervention strategies for the management and treatment of clients with psychosocial illness. Students will attain knowledge pertaining to the occupational therapy practice framework and appreciate the uniqueness of activity analysis in the creative decision making process for clients afflicted with psychosocial dysfunction. This course includes laboratory experiences to develop clinical reasoning and practice skills and students will participate in level one fieldwork to integrate practice and theory. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Limited to OCT majors. Not open to students who have received credit for OCT 407 . Prerequisite: OCT 408 . Co-requisite: OCT 411 .
  
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    OCT 408 Research, Writing and Learning I

    3 Credit(s) Q W
    This course will develop formal skills in critical inquiry and decision-making. Students will use literature and technology resources to determine interventions based in scientific evidence and best professional practice. Students will conduct literature searches and collect data to answer assessment, descriptive and intervention effectiveness questions. Assisted by faculty, students will formulate a research question, evaluate research articles, and establish an annotated bibliography for the final capstone project. Two hours of lecture and one hour of lab per week. Limited to OCT majors. Prerequisites: OCT 400N , OCT 401 , OCT 402 , OCT 403 . Co-requisites: OCT 404 , OCT 406 .
  
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    OCT 411 Theoretical Principles of Occupation I

    2 Credit(s)


    This course will provide occupational therapy students with a comprehensive overview of medical conditions and theoretical approaches utilized with clients afflicted with psychosocial dysfunction. A key focus will be for students to establish a base-line competency in problem identification and data collection analysis and utilize quantitative research within psychosocial occupational therapy literature to develop evidence-based solutions for identified problems. Students will articulate clinical based problem solutions through multiple writing and verbal based assignments. Two lecture hours per week. Limited to OCT majors. Prerequisite: OCT408 . Co-requisite: OCT407  or OCT407N .

     

     

  
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    OCT 412 Theoretical Principles of Occupation II

    2 Credit(s)
    This course will impart to occupational therapy students a comprehensive overview of theoretical approaches utilized with clients diagnosed with physical disease, disability or disruption in occupation. Students will develop skills in discerning multiple physical conditions and disease processes while enhancing problem identification technique. The case study model will be used to enhance student’s understanding of therapeutic and professional problem solving based in occupational science and the language presented in the occupational therapy practice framework. Two lecture hours per week. Limited to OCT majors. Prerequisite: OCT 411 . Co-requisite: OCT 413 .
  
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    OCT 413 OT Analysis and Interventions II

    4 Credit(s)
    This course will utilize a variety of assessment tools for problem identification and interpretation. Students will develop an understanding of occupational performance and context, and appreciate the uniqueness of activity analysis in the decision making process for clients diagnosed with physical disability. This course will develop skills needed for the planning and implementation of intervention strategies for the management and treatment of the physically disabled adult population in a variety of clinical settings. The course includes multiple lab experiences and participation in level I fieldwork. Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory a week. Limited to OCT majors. Prerequisite: OCT 411 . Co-requisite: OCT 412 .
  
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    OCT 611 Assistive Technologies

    2 Credit(s)
    This course will provide occupational therapy students with a lecture and laboratory-based introduction on the use of adaptive and assistive technologies. It is designed to provide a basic understanding of various types of technologies, user populations, and environments. Additional topics will be integrated into this course including universal design, funding, legislative policy, and resources. Required as prerequisite for and bridge course to occupational therapy masters degree program. Two lecture hours with lab experience. Limited to OCT majors. Lab fee required. Prerequisites: OCT400, OCT 401 , OCT 402 , OCT 403 , OCT 406 , OCT 408 .
  
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    OCT 613 Occupational Therapy Policy & Practice

    2 Credit(s)
    This is a web-based course that will provide students with a foundation in understanding health care delivery systems and models, legislative and ethical issues and concerns, healthcare policies, and political systems. Corporate, legal and regulatory factors including liability, risk management, and regulation (state practice acts, regulatory and accrediting commissions) will be explored. Students will promote professional advocacy through participating in current state and national lobbying efforts affecting occupational therapy practice. Required as prerequisite for and bridge course to occupational therapy masters degree program. Two lecture hours per week. Limited to OCT majors. Prerequisite: OCT 611 .
  
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    OCT 622 Civic Advancement & Admininistration I

    2 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to develop and enhance the student’s competence to function effectively within any system delivering occupational therapy services. Organization and administration theory will be applied to occupational therapy practice with an emphasis on external and internal influences affecting administrative functions, marketing, communications, supervision, quality assurance, and professional advocacy. Required as prerequisite for and bridge course to occupational therapy masters degree program. Two lecture hours per week. Limited to OCT majors. Prerequisites: OCT 611 , OCT 613 .

Operations and Decision Sciences

  
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    ODS 262 Quantitative Analysis

    3 Credit(s) Q
    This course introduces quantitative analysis applicable in a business setting. The collection, tabulation, representation, presentation, analysis and interpretation of data, as applicable to decision making in such areas as quality control, finance, accounting, marketing, management and research are examined from a descriptive and an inferential perspective. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ODS362. Prerequisite: BUS 170 .
  
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    ODS 300 Principles of Quality Management

    3 Credit(s)
    An introduction to the theory and practice of quality management, history, terminology, and techniques.The course will integrate the philosophy, techniques, and research in the field. It will consider aspects of quality management in the design, development, manufacture, purchasing, distribution, marketing, servicing, and other operational support functions, both internal and external to the firm. Key principles of quality management to include leadership, strategic planning, human resources, process management, and customer satisfaction will be examined through lectures, case study approach, and industry site visits. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for MIS440.
    Prerequisites: Prerequisites: MIS362 or ODS 262 , MGT 231  or MGT 332 .
  
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    ODS 320 Managerial Decisions and Risk

    3 Credit(s)
    An examination of the structuring of business decisions involving uncertainty. Emphasis will be placed on the application of Bayesian Networks and Influence Diagrams as tools to assist in the decision making process.  A comprehensive approach to analyzing risk using probability, sensitivity analysis and the psychological aspects of decision making such as framing and grounding will be covered.  Three lecture hours per week.  Prerequisite: BUS 170 
  
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    ODS 333 Operations and Logistics Management

    3 Credit(s)
    Management of production and service operations. Design of products, scheduling, dispatching, simplification methods, maintenance, quality and cost control, selection of plant and equipment, and plant layout. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for ODS433. Required of and limited to Business Administration juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: ACC 106 .
  
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    ODS 340 Introducation to Business Intelligence

    3 Credit(s)
    This course introduces students to the technologies, applications and processes for user-centered exploration of data, data relationships and trends used to improve the information about an organization and its competitors for business planning and decision making. This course approaches business intelligence from the managerial perspective and emphasizes Business Intelligence (BI) application and implementation to drive positive business actions.  Concepts of performance management, business metrics, data visualization, and the use of technology solutions will be covered.  Three lecture hours per week.  BUS 170 
  
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    ODS 370 Data Mining

    3 Credit(s)
    An examination of data mining with emphasis placed on machine learning topics such as classification using Bayesian approaches, Neural Networks, CART, Decision Trees, Regression, Nearest Neighbor and other techniques.  Use of bootstrap methods, bagging and boosting will be covered.  Data preparation on how to handle missing data and evaluation concepts such as cross validation, ROC and confusion matrices will be covered.  Three lecture hours per week.  Prerequisite: BUS 170 
  
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    ODS 375 Business Systems Optimization

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is offered for students who are interested in the multidisciplinary design aspects of complex systems.  The focus of this course is on the quantitative aspect of design, analysis and implementation of systems.  The objective of the course is to present tools and methodologies for performing system optimization in a multidisciplinary design context.  Focus will be equally strong on all three aspects of the problem: (i) the multidisciplinary character of business systems, (ii) design of these complex systems, and (iii) tools for optimization and evaluation.  Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: BUS 170 
  
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    ODS 380 Simulation and Risk Analysis

    3 Credit(s)
    This course introduces students to technologies and practices for simulation used to model complex systems.  This course covers modeling and simulation principles with applications to complex systems.  It covers modeling and risk assessment approaches with a focus on continuous and discrete event simulation.  This course surveys applications of simulation for complex systems across a broad range of domains.  Three lecture hours per week.  Prerequisite: BUS 170 
  
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    ODS 467 Forecasting and Predictive Analytics

    3 Credit(s)
    An examination of short- and long-term forecasting methods, and their application in planning, decision-making and control. The traditional forecasting methods will be augmented by inclusion of prediction methods such as logistic regression and neural networks. Applications directly related to all subject areas of Business will be covered and software used for forecasting and prediction will be used. Emphasis willl be placed on problem solving, class discussion, and computer application.  Three lecture hours per week. Required of Business Administration, ODS Concentration. Not open to students who have received credit for MIS467. Prerequisites: ODS 262 , MAT 108  or MAT 208 .
  
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    ODS 495 Internship in Operations and Decision Sciences

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides students with an opportunity to receive academic credit for supervised professional training and experience in an actual work environment. This Internship is an ongoing seminar between the student, the faculty member and the employment supervisor. It involves a Learning Contract, periodic meetings with the faculty representative, professional experience at a level equivalent to other senior-level courses, and submission of materials as established in the Learning Contract. Minimum commitment: 12 hours per week for entire semester. Limited to ODS Concentration Juniors and Seniors only. Prerequisite: Department Chairperson’s approval.

Philosophy

  
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    PHL 100 Introduction to Philosophy

    3 Credit(s) DI PGR
    A study is made of the role of philosophy in its relation to all areas of human knowledge. The student is introduced to some of the general questions, ideas, theories, and methods of inquiry which have given direction to Western thought. Students are encouraged to clarify and examine their own ideas regarding knowledge, reality, and value. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    PHL 125 Critical Reasoning

    3 Credit(s) DI
    The goal of the course is to foster important cognitive and communication skills. Students will consider the structure of arguments (premises, inferences and conclusions) and the difference between inductive and deductive logic. Students will study how some uses of language, especially of ambiguous, vague or emotive terms, detract from good reasoning and how writers can remedy these defects. Students will learn to recognize some common informal fallacies. Students will examine several concepts essential in scientific and other inductive inquiries, including causal reasoning, inductive generalization, statistical reasoning, analogical reasoning and reasoning from accepted authority. Finally, the course will help students to gain greater media literacy. Critical Reasoning is recommended for students in all majors. Not open to students who have received credit for Principles of Logic (PHL201). Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    PHL 126 Critical Reasoning Through Writing

    3 Credit(s) W-I
    The goal of the course is to foster important cognitive and communicative skills through the use of various writing exercise.  Students will consider the structure of arguments (premise, inferences and conclusions) and the differences between inductive and deductive logic.  Students will study how some uses of language, especially ambiguous, vague or emotive terms, detract from good reasoning and how writers can remedy these defects.  Students will learn to recognize some common informal fallacies.  Students will examine several concepts essential in scientific and other inductive inquiries, including casual reasoning, inductive generalizations, statistical reasoning, analogical reasoning and reasoning from accepted authority.  The course will apply all of these lessons to both formal and informal pieces of writing generated in the process of reading, analyzing, interpreting, synthesizing and evaluating several genres of philosophical writing—viz. professional journal articles, essays on popular culture, philosophers’ blog, and opinion editorials.  In exposing students to genres of writing beyond the scope of strictly professional academic literature, the course will also help students to gain greater media literacy and deeper understanding of the way media works.  Critical Reasoning through Writing is recommended for students in all majors.  Not open to students who have received credit for PHL125 or PHL201.
  
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    PHL 203 Business Ethics

    3 Credit(s) DI CS PGR
    Business Ethics introduces students to major theories of social and economic justice and helps students reflect upon the rationale for and obligations of privately owned businesses in a good and just society. Students also examine consequentialist and deontological moral theories and how moral principles apply to concrete problems in business and professional life. Through the investigation of normative first principles and the analysis of case studies, students explore what legal and social frameworks businesses ought to operate under and how, within today’s globalized economy, to ethically resolve the competing interests of owners, creditors, employees, customers, governments, and other people and institutions (and perhaps non-human animals or ecosystems) directly or indirectly affected by businesses. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Sociology majors with a Human Behavior in Organizations option, SMS majors with Sport Management Concentration and recommended for Business Administration majors.
  
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    PHL 209 Social Ethics

    3 Credit(s) DI CS PGR
    An inquiry into the major theories in Moral Philosophy, with special application to social problems. Issues to be discussed will include some of the following: abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, sexual equality, discrimination and reverse discrimination, pornography and censorship, violence, economic injustice, and environmental and population control. Recommended of Social Work majors, but also open to other students. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    PHL 218 Medical Ethics

    3 Credit(s) DI PGR
    This course introduces students to major principles of medical ethics, and helps students to reflect on the ethical obligations of medical practitioners in a complex and rapidly changing health care environment. Students also examine consequentialist and deontological moral theories and how moral principles apply to concrete problems in medical practice. Through the analysis of case studies, students learn to critically examine the ethical obligations of medicine individually and socially, and how to resolve moral dilemmas relating to medical care both at the beginning and end of life, as well as the just use of novel technologies in genetic testing and reproduction. Three lecture hours per week. Recommended for Nursing majors.
  
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    PHL 224 Environmental Ethics

    3 Credit(s) DI PGR
    This course will incorporate a survey of the philosophical issues and methodological assumptions employed in the developing field of environmental ethics with a study of the ethical issues raised by the current environmental movement. Some of the issues to be discussed will be the moral status of animals and our natural environment, pollution, population, hunger, energy, our obligation to future generations and the just distribution of scarce resources.
  
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    PHL 226 Symbolic Logic I: Propositional Logic

    3 Credit(s) DI or DII
    This introductory course examines truth-functional logic, a branch of deductive logic. Students will learn how to symbolize English sentences into propositional logic and test arguments, sentences, and sets of sentences in proportional logic for truth-functional truth/falsity/indeterminacy, truth-functional equivalence, truth-functional consistency/inconsistency, truth-functional validity/invalidity, and truth-functional entailment. The methods used to test for those properties will include truth tables, natural deduction, and truth trees. Not open to students who have received credit for PHL325. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    PHL 240N History of Western Philosophy I: Antiquity & the Middle Ages

    3 Credit(s) DI HP
    A survey of Western philosophy from its Greek origins in the 6th-century B.C. to European high scholasticism in the 13th- and 14th-centuries A.D. Students will be introduced to major philosophical ideas of Pre-Socratic, Classical Greek, and Hellenistic thinkers and will trace the influence of these ideas upon medieval philosophers. Course themes include the nature of reality, knowledge, and the life of excellence. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for PHL240.
  
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    PHL 260N History of Western Philosophy II: the Modern Era

    3 Credit(s) DI HP
    A survey of major philosophical figures of modern Western philosophy such as Descartes, Hume, Kant, and Hegel. Arguably, modern Western philosophy began with 15th-century Renaissance thought and ended in the 19th century. Topics may include the existence and nature of God, the extent and sources of human knowledge, the nature of substance, and the mind/body problem. Three lecture hours per week. Completion of PHL 240N  is recommended before PHL260N. Not open to students who have received credit for PHL160 or PHL260.
  
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    PHL 303 Philosophy of Religion

    3 Credit(s) DI PGR
    A critical study of the relationship between faith and knowledge. Special emphasis will be placed on the following themes: the existence and nature of God, the problem of evil, immorality, religion and science, naturalistic explanations of religion, religious language, and religious experience. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    PHL 304 Existentialism

    3 Credit(s) DI W
    An analysis and discussion of the “human condition,” with special emphasis on the philosophic literature of Kierkegaard, Nietszche, Heidegger, Sartre and others. Three lecture hours per week. Recommended for English and Psychology Majors.
  
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    PHL 305 Social and Political Philosophy

    3 Credit(s) DI W CS W-II
    The course examines major normative theories of society and politics.  Particular attention will be paid to questions of justice, rights, liberty, equality, natural law, and political obligations. Theories studied include libertarianism, contractarianism, communitarianism, utilitarianism, democratic theory, capitalism, socialism, Marxism, anarchism, environmentalism, or other significant theories of social and political philosophy.  Not open to students who have received credit for PHL305A.  Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    PHL 307 Ethics

    3 Credit(s) DI PGR
    A critical analysis of the different types of ethical theories through a reading and discussion of selected classical and contemporary works. Special emphasis will be placed on the ontological status of moral values and the problems of freedom and responsibility. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    PHL 308N Philosophy of Art

    3 Credit(s) DI CEA
    This course will critically examine philosophical theories of art and beauty as they impact artistic creation, reception, and performance. Students will explore concepts of beauty across different cultures and styles of artwork, and examine theories of art in their application to painting, music and theatre. Through these and other modalities, students explore the existential and ontological dimensions of aesthetics while learning about classical works of art. Three lecture hours per week. Required for Music majors. Recommended for Art and English majors and minors.
  
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    PHL 309A Alternatives to Violence: Philosophical Approach

    3 Credit(s) DI V PGR
    This course explores the alternatives to violence by critically analyzing the lives and thoughts of major western and nonwestern practitioners of nonviolence, including Henry David Thoreau, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr. and contemporary practitioners like Dalai Lama, Thich Nhat Hanh, Nelson Mandela, Aung San Suu Kyi and others. It considers different conflict resolution methods than can be applied at interpersonal, community, country and global levels. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for PHL309.
  
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    PHL 310N Philosophy and Religion of the Eastern World

    3 Credit(s) DI V WC W-II
    A study of the classical literature of Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Taoisim, Confucuanism and Shinto. Traditional problems of the nature of human beings, such as reincarnation and the problem of evil, will be discussed in the context of the social/cultural matrix of the East. The objective of this course is to help students acquire a better understanding of the philosophy of the Eastern world and to determine how Eastern philosophy may complement that of the West. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for PHL310.
  
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    PHL 311 Sustainable People, Sustainable Planet

    3 Credit(s) PGR W-II
    Sustainability recognizes that social equity, environmental integrity, and economic prosperity are all worthy goals, but these goals are in tension with one another; it is therefore difficult, if not impossible, to maximize all three of them concurrently. Some objectives of sustainability are often realized at the cost of other equally valid objectives. How do people collectively move towards an ideal balance between these different aspects of sustainability? This course approaches sustainability from multiple viewpoints and explores various models for understanding sustainability. Through a variety of experiences students will examine the conflicts and trade-offs that result from the effort to put sustainability into practice. Students will also consider different approaches to sustainable living in order to find out how to integrate the ideal of sustainability in their own lives. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: W-I.
  
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    PHL 312 Philosophy of Love and Sex

    3 Credit(s) DI
    A philosophical exploration of the issues of human sexuality and love-physical, emotional and spiritual (“Eros”, “Philia”, “Agape”), through reading and discussion of selected literature. Conceptual, moral, social and political questions about human sexuality and love will be analyzed, clarified and evaluated. The whole range of human sexual experiences and love will be considered, i.e., autoerotic sexuality, heterosexuality, homosexuality, bisexuality, marriage, friendship and pornography.
  
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    PHL 313 Philosophy of Mind

    3 Credit(s) DI
    An examination of historical and contemporary questions in philosophy of mind, such as: What are minds? If minds are immaterial, how do they interact with bodies? If minds are material, how can they be conscious? What are consciousness, intelligence, and free will, and could computers have those traits? How can mental states be about things, even about non-existent things? How do psychological explanations relate to explanations in neuroscience, chemistry, and physics? Can emotions be rational? Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    PHL 314 Philosophy of Science

    3 Credit(s) DI
    A study of philosophical issues related to science. Topics may include: What is science, and is astrology, for instance bad science or not science at all? Do scientists identify the essence of things, or do scientists classify according to their interests and values? Is a good scientific theory true or merely useful? Do all sciences reduce to physics? No particular scientific background is presupposed, but previous philosophical coursework is recommended. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    PHL 315 Reality and Knowledge

    3 Credit(s) DI
    The course examines contemporary metaphysics and epistemology. Metaphysics studies fundamental issues about the nature of reality such as ontology, mereology, modality, causation, space, time, the mind/body relation, free will, and materialism vs. idealism. Epistemology scrutinizes the sources, structure, limits, and nature of knowledge. Epistemological topics include skepticism, induction, whether the standards for knowledge vary, and what roles reason, the senses, memory, and testimony play in acquiring and justifying knowledge. Prior coursework in philosophy is recommended but not required. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    PHL 316 American Pragmatism

    3 Credit(s) DI CS
    The course explores uniquely American contributions to philosophy primarily, if not exclusively, through the study of the influential pragmatist thinkers C.S. Pierce, William James, and John Dewey.  Students will examine these philosophers’ approaches to subjects such as truth, knowledge, ethics, religion, education, and pluralism.  The course may also include other American philosophers within or outside of the pragmatist tradition.  Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    PHL 317 Philosophy of Happiness

    3 Credit(s) CS W-II
    Happiness is a concept that has received attention in philosophy, psychology, political science, and economics. This course will philosophically evaluate competing conceptions of the nature, source and value of happiness, as well as the relation between these theories and contemporary debates about well-being. The following questions, among others, will be discussed: What is happiness? Is it necessary for a worthwhile life? Does happiness depend on one’s state of mind, one’s circumstances or both? Are the “Happy Life” and the “Good Life” the same? We will explore both historical and contemporary sources, including such philosophers as Aristotle, Mill, and Kekes. We may also look at current scientific literature and studies on happiness. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    PHL 320 Philosophical Perspectives on Women

    3 Credit(s) DI PGR W-II


    An introduction and critical examination of the contemporary feminist theories, liberal feminism, radical feminism, socialist feminism, postmodernist feminism and others. It will include applications of feminist theories to women’s sexual experience, work experience, pornography and other experiences. Discussions will focus on how women relate to themselves, to others, and to social and political institutions, and if contemporary feminist theorists address the voice of Black, Hispanic and non-western women. The objective of the course is to give students an overview of current western and non-western feminist thought. As a W-II course, this course uses writing to help students learn and practice writing for various purposes and audiences. 3 lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: W-I

     

     

  
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    PHL 326 Symbolic Logic II: Predicate Logic

    3 Credit(s) DI or DII
    This course introduces students to predicate logic and its unique form of writing deductive proof. Students will learn how to symbolize English sentences into predicate logic and test arguments, sentences, and sets of sentences in predicate logic for quantificational truth/falsity/indeterminacy, quantificational equivalence, quantificational consistency/inconsistency, quantificational validity/invalidity, and quantificational entailment. The methods used to test for those properties will include natural deductions and truth trees. In addition, students will learn the basics of Aristotelian syllogisms and how to use Venn Diagrams to test these syllogisms for validity/invalidity. Not open to students who have received credit for PHL325. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: PHL 226  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    PHL 350H Topics in Ethics

    3 Credit(s) DI PGR
    An examination of some of the most widely read and influential works in the history of moral philosophy, such as Aristotle’s Nichomachean Ethics, Immanuel Kant’s Fundamental Principles of the Metaphysics of Morals, and John Stuart Mill’s Utilitarianism, with applications to some of the following contemporary moral issues: euthanasia, suicide, war, sex, discrimination, affirmative action, and ethical problems in business and medicine. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    PHL 450 Special Topics

    3 Credit(s) DI W
    This course examines a single topic or set of related topics in any of the major fields of philosophy such as history of philosophy, metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, or social and political philosophy. Through writing and revision, students will develop writing skills that are needed for philosophical study. The specific topic or topics are stated when the course is scheduled. Open to all students who have completed one previous course in philosophy. Other students require permission of the Department Chairperson. May be repeated with permission of the Department Chairperson. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    PHL 490 Senior Seminar

    3 Credit(s) DI W
    This course integrates students’ previous knowledge of philosophy through work on special topics or problems in major areas of philosophy. Students will do research, participate in classroom discussions, and write reflective essays to assess their progress in the course. Students will also write multiple drafts of an integrated research paper. Offered every Fall. Students require permission of Department Chairperson. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    PHL 500 Tutorial, Readings and Research in Philosophy

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to allow the individual to pursue interests in philosophy beyond the limits of the regualr course offerings under the direction of an instructor of choice. Through selection of an individual topic or field, the student will be encouraged to enlarge his or her vision and to participate in a philosophic dialogue using the methods of research or community service or internship. Meetings by arrangement. Prerequisites: A minimum of two courses in Philosophy and permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    PHL 520 Internship In Philosophy

    3 Credit(s)
    PHL520 is an internship designed to provide relevant on-the-job training and work experiences for students in the Applied Ethics and the Philosophy of Art and Culture Concentrations of the Liberal Studies Major.  Time and service arrangements contracted between student, training site and Philosophy Department.  The number of credit hours varies with commitment, intern advisor’s recommendation and Chairperson’s approval.  Open to majors in the Bachelor of Liberal Studies, Applied Ethics or Philosophy of Art & Culture concentration only.
    Prerequisites: Completion of at least 9 credits of Philosophy courses, junior or senior status, and permission of the department chairperson.
  
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    PHL 600H Honors Seminar: Philosophy

    3 Credit(s) DI
    An intensive examination of philosophers, topics, issues, theories or themes conducted as a seminar. Specific subject matter will be announced each time this course is taught. Open only to Honors students. Three lecture hours per week.

Physics

  
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    PHS 101A Physical Science I

    4 Credit(s) DII SR SRL
    Selected topics from physics, chemistry, & astronomy, will be explored with emphasis on the process of scientific investigation and the development of scientific concepts, reasoning skills, and mathematical modeling. Topics to be investigated may include properties of matter, the relationship between motion and energy, and energy conservation. No previous background in science is assumed. Together with PHS 102A  or PHS 107 , this course satisfies the full-year sequence in laboratory science. Three lecture hours, and one two-hour lab per week. Not open to students who have received credits for PHS105 or PHS101.
  
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    PHS 102A Physical Science II

    4 Credit(s) DII
    This course is a continuation of PHS 101A , examining additional topics in physical science. There will be an emphasis on the process of scientific investigation and the development of scientific concepts, reasoning skills, and mathematical modeling. Topics may include electricity, and magnetism; atomic and chemical structure; the properties of light; and observational astronomy. Three lecture hours, and one two-hour laboratory per week. Not open to students who have received credits for PHS106 or PHS102. Prerequisite: PHS 101A  or PHS101 or PHS105.
  
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    PHS 107 The Physics of Music and Voice

    4 Credit(s) DII
    Introduction to the fundamental concepts and techniques of acoustics, particularly as applied to the performing arts. Topics will include a description of waves and wave motion; frequency and pitch; interference, standing, waves, and resonance; intensity levels and loudness. The course will also explore the fundamentals of musical instruments, including stringed instruments, woodwinds, and percussion. Three lecture hours and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Together with PHS 101A  or PHS 211A  or PHS 221  this course satisfies the Laboratory Sequence. Prerequisite: PHS 101A  or PHS 211A  or PHS 221 .
  
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    PHS 205 Digital Circuit Design

    4 Credit(s) DII
    This course introduces logic design and digital circuit fundamentals. Topics include: binary systems, Boolean algebra, combinatorial and sequential circuit analysis and design, and fundamental building blocks of modern computers, such as multiplexers, decoders, counters and registers. Students are involved in hands-on laboratory activities and team projects to apply learned theory to the design, simulation and implementation of digital circuits using current computer aided-design software and hardware tools. Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite: MAT220 , or MAT110  or equivalent.
  
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    PHS 207 Astronomy

    3 Credit(s) DII Q
    Introduction to topics in modern astronomy. Topics may include the origin and evolution of the solar system; the search for extra-solar planets; the lives and deaths of stars; the structure of the galaxy; modern theories of cosmology; and the search for extraterrestrial life. Emphasis on the latest results in research astronomy, from the perspective of the enthusiastic novice. Required periodic visual observations and visits to the Collins Observatory will supplement lectures. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: MAT202N or permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    PHS 211A College Physics I

    4 Credit(s) DII Q SR SRL
    An introduction to principles of classical mechanics, with emphasis on development of problem-solving skills. Topics include the relationship between force and motion, the conservation of energy and momentum, rotational motion, and simple harmonic motion. Algebra, geometry and elementary trigonometry are used freely. Three lecture hours, one discussion period and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Emphasizes biological science applications. Not open to students who have received credits for PHS211. Prerequisite: MAT202N or equivalent.
  
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    PHS 212A College Physics II

    4 Credit(s) DII SR SRL
    Continuation of PHS 211A . This course examines additional topics in classical physics, including fluid dynamics; thermal properties of matter, the laws of thermodynamics; principles of electricity and magnetism; D.C. circuits, electromagnetic induction. A strong emphasis on problem solving skills, in which algebra, geometry and elementary trigonometry are used freely. Three lecture hours, one discussion period and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Emphasizes biological science applications. Not open to students who have received credit for PHS212. Prerequisites: MAT202N or equivalent and PHS 211A  or PHS 222 .
  
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    PHS 221 General Physics I with Calculus

    4 Credit(s) DII Q SR SRL
    Calculus-based survey of selected topics in classical mechanics, including kinematics and Newtonian mechanics; one-and two-dimensional collisions; energy conservation; rotational motion and angular momentum; harmonic motion and oscillations. Recommended for Chemistry majors. Three lecture hours, one mandatory discussion hour, and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Cannot be taken for credit with PHS 211A . Not open to students who have received credit for PHS213. Prerequisite: MAT202N or equivalent. Co-requisite: MAT 220 .
  
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    PHS 222 General Physics II with Calculus

    4 Credit(s) DII SR SRL
    Continuation of PHS 221 . Calculus-based survey of selected topics in classical electrodynamics and geometric optics, including electric fields & Gauss’ Law; electric potential; D.C. circuits; magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction; the electromagnetic field, reflection and refraction of light. Recommended for Chemistry majors. Cannot be taken for credits with PHS212 or PHS 212A . Not open to students who have received credits for PHS214. Prerequisites: PHS 221  or PHS213 and MAT 220 . Co-requisite: MAT 221 .
  
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    PHS 311 General Physics III

    4 Credit(s) Q
    This course examines topics in electromagnetism and wave motion, including properties of waves; geometric optics; interference and diffraction of light; the electromagnetic spectrum and wave-particle duality. Selected topics in modern physics will be introduced as time permits. Three lecture hours, one discussion period, and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: PHS 212A  or PHS212 or PHS214.
  
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    PHS 312 Modern Physics

    4 Credit(s)
    Introduction to the major developments in physics during the 20th Century. Topics include blackbody radiation and Planck’s constant; the photoelectric effect, development of quantum theory, the structure of matter; particle physics and cosmology. Three lecture hours, one discussion period, and one three-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: PHS 311  and MAT 221 .
  
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    PHS 315 Introduction to Radiation Physics

    3 Credit(s)
    This course examines problems in radiation physics, including nuclear structure; radioactive decay and activity; uses of radioactivity; the interaction of radiation with matter; radiation detection and measurement; radiation dosimetry; biological applications and hazards of radioactivity. Intended for Nuclear Medicine Technologists. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: PHS 211A  and PHS 212A , or PHS 221  and PHS 222 .
  
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    PHS 570 Directed Study in Physics

    1-6 Credit(s)
    This course will consist of readings in particular areas of physics, under the direction of a staff member. Students wishing to register for this course must make prior arrangements with the faculty members involved. Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    PHS 571 Special Problems in Physics

    1-6 Credit(s)
    This course provides research direction and participation in any area of physics of interest to the student and for which a faculty specialist is available for supervision. Open only to students who have completed at least three semesters of college physics. Requires the approval of the supervising faculty member. Students must make prior arrangements with the faculty member. Demands on faculty time and laboratory equipment will necessarily limit the openings in this course. A paper will be required at the end of the course. Prerequisites: Consent of faculty member and permission of Department Chairperson.

Political Science

  
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    POL 101 Understanding the Political World

    3 Credit(s) DIII V CS
    This course introduces students to the study of  politics (including political ideas and behaviors, political institutions, and public policies), both in the United States and abroad. Topics may include democracy and authoritarianism, political parties and elections, political violence, and globalization. The course also familiarizes students with key academic skills such as critical thinking and information literacy, as well as to the requirements and opportunities that are part of the Political Science program.  Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    POL 110H Honors Understanding the Political World

    3 Credit(s) DIII CS
    Concentrated study of topics in Political Science introducing qualified students to central concepts, structures, and processes of politics and government.  Course topics may include: democracy in America, globalization, ethnic conflict, social justice, etc.  The seminar format will emphasize critical analysis of assigned readings, extensive student participation in class discussions, and engagement in various forms of written reflection.  Three seminar hours per week. Prerequisite: Honors Program student; or, Political Science major or minor with the permission of the department chairperson.
  
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    POL 201 Introduction to American Politics

    3 Credit(s) DIII CS
    This course provides an analysis of the United States political system, with primary emphasis on the national government. Students will discuss the U.S. Constitution as well as the powers and functions of Congress, the presidency and the Supreme Court. They also will evaluate the changing roles of political parties, interest groups and citizens in American democracy. Additionally, students will debate contemporary issues and events. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    POL 219 Introduction to Public Policy

    3 Credit(s) DIII OC
    This course provides an introduction to contemporary issues in American public policy. The course will examine the roles of interests, political institutions, governmental and nongovernmental actors, and the media in shaping public policy. We will identify competing goals, problem definitions, and solutions in policy debates over issues such as social welfare, criminal justice, economics, civil rights, healthcare, education and the environment. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    POL 231 Introduction to Political Theory

    3 Credit(s)
    A survey of the history of political theory. Intended to introduce students to the major theoretical answers to fundamental questions of political life. Readings may include selections from Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Tocqueville, Marx and Nietzsche. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credits for POL300 or POL302.
  
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    POL 251 Introduction to International Relations

    3 Credit(s) DIII HP
    This course is about understanding how the origins and historic evolution of the international system fundamentally shape the structure and functioning of international relations (IR) today. In addition to introducing basic concepts and analytical frameworks, the first part of this course uses contending theories of IR to describe and interpret the major global events of the modern era. Building on this foundation the second part of the course explores several key issue-areas in IR: international law and governance. security and conflict, the global economy, and global human welfare. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for POL351.
  
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    POL 271 Introduction to Comparative Politics

    3 Credit(s) WC
    This course introduces students to the comparative study of politics by examining the political systems and political cultures of selected developed and developing countries. Topics covered go beyond institutions and public policies, encompassing, for example, a study of how ethnicity and religion shape politics and of the role played by political culture. The course also teaches students how to analyze and compare unfamiliar societies. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    POL 300R Introduction to Research in Political Science

    3 Credit(s) DIII Q
    As an introduction to the fundamentals of scientific inquiry as they apply to political science, this course will explore the nature and process of social science research generally, and applied political science research with a focus on methodologies particularly prominent within our discipline. Representative political science research examples will be critically analyzed to illuminate course topics and establish frameworks for assessing the validity and utility of various forms of political research. The practical application of research methodologies to the study of empirical political questions will be emphasized. Three seminar hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for POL291.
 

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