Oct 19, 2021  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

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Chemistry

  
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    CHE 309 Biochemistry

    4 Credit(s) Q
    An introduction to carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids, which will include metabolic pathways, the role of vitamins and detoxification mechanisms. The laboratory deals with enzyme kinetics and the solution of practical analytical problems using chromatographic, instrumental and wet chemical methods. Three lecture hours and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite:        
  
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    CHE 321 Quantitative Analysis

    4 Credit(s) Q W
    This course deals with the fundamental principles of classical analysis and electrochemistry with specific emphasis on gravimetry, titrimetry, potentiometry, voltammetry and amperometry. The laboratory work includes the use of analytical balances, glassware and electronics in order to quantitate single constituents of mixtures gravimetrically, volumetrically, complexometrically and electrochemically. Three lecture hours and one four-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisite:        
  
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    CHE 340 Techniques in Inorganic and Organic Synthesis

    4 Credit(s) W-III
    This laboratory course explores advanced chemical synthesis. The laboratory experiments will focus on the synthesis and characterization of inorganic and organic compounds. The purpose of the course is to build on a student’s experience in the laboratory through the use of new synthesis techniques and instrumentation applications. The use of specialized glassware and instruments such as the FT-IR, FT-NMR and UV-VIs will be a main part of the course. One lecture hour and two three hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites:         
  
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    CHE 341 Physical Chemistry I

    4 Credit(s) Q
    This course will cover quantum theory; molecular and atomic structure; vibrational, rotational and electronic spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and statistical mechanics. Three lecture hours and one three hour laboratory per week. Not open to students who have received credit for CHE332. Prerequisites: CHE130,           MAT 221   or  PHS221,    or PHS 222 .
  
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    CHE 342 Physical Chemistry II

    4 Credit(s) Q
    This course will cover chemical kinetics, the laws of thermodynamics, phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium, and electrochemistry. Three lecture hours and one three hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: CHE130,          MAT 221   or   PHS 212A   or PHS 222 .
  
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    CHE 419 Advanced Biochemistry

    3 Credit(s)
    This course builds upon Biochemistry ( ).  The focus of this course is the understanding of the enzyme catalyzed biochemical reactions and mechanisms relating to bioenergetics and metabolism.  Topics may include glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, metabolic regulation, citric acid cycle, fatty acid catabolism, amino acid oxidation, oxidative phosphorylation, hormone regulation and biosynthesis of lipids, amino acids and nucleotides.  Three lecture hours per week.
    Prerequisite:   or  .
  
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    CHE 420 Instrumental Analysis for Clinical Chemists

    4 Credit(s) Q
    This course will involve a study of the instrumentation, theoretical aspects and the application of physiochemical principles for the solution of analytical problems in the area of clinical chemistry. Ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence and phosphorescence, nephalometry and turbidimetry, flame photometry, atomic absorption spectroscopy, ion exchange, gas, liquid, and thin layer chromatographics, specific ion potentiometry, radiochemical methods, and kinetic methods of analysis will be discussed. The laboratory will involve detailed investigation of important clinical, analytical problems utilizing the above-listed techniques. Three lecture hours, one two-hour laboratory discussion and one two-hour laboratory period per week. Prerequisites: CHE 231  and PHS 212A  or PHS 222 .
  
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    CHE 422 Instrumental Analysis

    4 Credit(s)
    This course will involve the study of the theoretical aspects, chemical applications, and the instrumentation of the physiochemical principles that are the foundations of Instrumental Analysis. Topics covered will be the absorption, emission, and the scattering of various forms of electromagnetic radiation; the various forms of chromatography, mass to charge ratio, and the interaction of electricity with matter. The laboratory will involve practical chemical experiments (qualitative and quantitative) based on some of the topics covered in lecture. Three lecture hours and two three-hour laboratory periods per week. Prerequisites: CHE 231 CHE 341 , PHS 212A  or PHS 222 .
  
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    CHE 441 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

    3 Credit(s)
    This course builds on Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry and Physical Chemistry. Topics include concepts of acids and bases; non-aqueous solvent systems; bonding and structure; molecular symmetry; solid state chemistry; coordination chemistry with an emphasis on ligand field theory, spectroscopy, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of coordination compounds; organometallic chemistry of mono and polynuclear metal carbonyl, alkyl and analogues. Catalysis and selected bioinorganic compounds will be covered briefly as well. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for CHE440. Prerequisites:   and  .
  
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    CHE 442 Physical Organic Chemistry

    3 Credit(s)
    This course deals with the physical basis for the reactivity of organic compounds and methods used to study reaction mechanisms. Topics to be covered include stereochemistry, structure and bonding, computational chemistry, solvation and structure-reactivity relationships. Methods used to elucidate organic reaction mechanisms will be discussed and their application to various classes of reactions will be studied. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to student who have received credit for CHE439. Prerequisites: CHE 341 , CHE 342 .
  
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    CHE 560 Chemistry Seminar

    2 Credit(s)
    This course provides scientific presentation experience, professional development, and a review of chemical concepts int he undergraduate curriculum.  Students will develop an oral presentation from current topics in chemical literature and/or the results of individual research.  The topics will be approved by Department members.  Students will develop a professional resume and cover letter appropriate for scientific job search.  Students will review chemical concepts from the undergraduate curriculum in preparation for taking standard tests for advanced study in science or medicine, or for entry into the job market.  Two class meetings per week. Prerequisite: Senior standing as a Chemistry major or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    CHE 570 Directed Study in Chemistry

    1-3 Credit(s)
    This course will consist of readings in particular areas of chemistry, under the direction of a staff member. Students wishing to register for this course must make prior arrangements with the faculty member involved. Cannot be taken for major credits in Chemistry. Open only to Junior and Senior Chemistry majors. Prerequisite: Consent of the faculty member and permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    CHE 572 Chemistry Research I

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides qualified students with research direction and the opportunity to participate in independent work in any area of chemistry of special interest to them, provided that a faculty supervisor is available. A paper and poster presentation are required at the end of the course. Open only to Junior and Senior Chemistry majors. Prerequisites: CHE 321  and CHE 341 , consent of the faculty supervisor and permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    CHE 573 Chemistry Research II

    3 Credit(s)
    This course builds on CHE 572 , continuing with the same project or starting a new project. Students in this course will be expected to present their results in a professional setting. Prerequisites: CHE 342  and CHE 572 , consent of the faculty supervisor and the permission of the Department Chairperson.

Chinese

  
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    CHI 101 Elementary Mandarin Chinese I

    3 Credit(s) WC
    This is a Mandarin Chinese language course for beginners aimed at developing communicative competency in the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing.  Students will learn basic vocabulary and sentence structures for use in essential everyday conversational situations.  Pinyin (a widely used Chinese phonetic system) will be taught as a tool to learn the spoken language.  Students will also learn Chinese characters.  Approximately 200 words and expressions in both Pinyin and characters will be taught.  Students will also learn about Chinese culture and society.  Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    CHI 102 Elementary Mandarin Chinese II

    3 Credit(s) WC
    A continuation of Elementary Chinese I (CHI 101). This course will further develop the basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing Chinese.  Building upon the vocabulary and sentence structure taught in the first semester, student will learn more useful expressions and sentence structures necessary for use in everyday conversational situations.  Students will also continue to learn to read and write Chinese characters and will write short essays in Chinese.  Students will also continue to explore various aspects of Chinese culture and society.  Three lectures hours per week. Prerequisite:   or equivalent.
  
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    CHI 201 Intermediate Mandarin Chinese I

    3 Credit(s) WC
    This course is the continuation of Elementary Chinese II. Students will continue to learn essential skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing for daily communication. A broad variety of expressions and complicated sentence structures will be taught so that students can participate in conversations on various topics related to modern Chinese society. While equal emphasis will still be given to characters and structures, students will be guided to write more Chinese essays. Activities related to the broad spectrum of Chinese life will facilitate knowledge and analysis of Chinese culture.
    Prerequisite:  or equivalent.
  
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    CHI 202 Intermediate Mandarin Chinese II

    3 Credit(s) WC
    This course is the continuation of Intermediate Mandarin Chinese I.  Students will continue to learn more essential skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing for daily communication. A broad variety of expressions and complicated sentence structures will be taught so that students can participate in conversations on various topics related to modern Chinese society.  While equal emphasis will still be given to both characters and structures, students will be guided to write more Chinese essays.  Activities related to the broad spectrum of Chinese life will facilitate knowledge and analysis of Chinese culture.  Prerequisite  or equivalent.

Communication

  
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    COM 100 Media in Our Lives

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is an examination of the effect and impact of media on contemporary life and society.  The course covers both the historical evolution of media as well as contemporary developments, controversial issues, and trends.  The course examines communication theories and models, historical and contemporary research, the media industries, and media law and ethics.  Three lecture hours per week.  Required of all Communications majors.
  
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    COM 105 Precision Writing in Communications

    3 Credit(s)
    Student will develop essential knowledge of, and practical experience applying, written English-language skills that underpin the media and communication discipline. The course will help students develop writing skills across a broad range of topics for a variety of platform and audiences. Three lecture hours per week. Required for Communications majors.
  
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    COM 110 Modern Media and Communications

    3 Credit(s) W-I
    This course introduces students to a number of writing strategies through the examination of modern media. It also introduces techniques for responding effectively to the writing of others and ways to identify genres and rhetorical strategies appropriate to various audiences, platforms and expected outcomes. Students will produce a variety of texts that explore the role of media in shaping communal discourses and individual identity using self-reflections and critical examination of how they engage with modern media on a daily basis. Cannot be used to satisfy courses required in the Communications major and minor except university-wide W-I requirements. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    COM 201 Introduction to Communications

    3 Credit(s) DI DIII
    This course examines key concepts of the mass media, tracing the evolution and history of major media institutions, from the invention of the printing press to the Internet and emerging media technologies and systems. Studying the media from multiple perspectives, students will become more media literate and sophisticated in their assessment of its influence on the global community. Three lecture hours per week. Required in the Communications major and minor.
  
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    COM 202 Writing for Media

    3 Credit(s) W-II
    This course covers the fundamentals of writing stories for print, digital, and emerging media. It will help students develop news writing skills across a broad range of topics for a variety of delivery platforms appropriate to both traditional and new journalism paradigms. Beat reporting, libel law, and ethical practices will also be addressed. Three lecture hours per week. Required for Communications majors in Journalism. Prerequisite: W-I course.
  
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    COM 205 Computer Production in Communications

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will involve the application of computer programs to the design and development of communication materials on Macintosh computers. Students will be introduced to computer software for word processing, spreadsheets and statistical software, web design and presentation software, and desktop publishing. Students will apply this knowledge be producing such communication materials as flyers, brochures, web sites, and other visual presentations. Techniques for printing materials accurately will be covered. Issues related to computer capabilities and limitations, usage, and societal impact are also discussed. This course may be used to satisfy computer literacy requirements. Limited to Communication majors and minors or other students with permission of department chair. Three lecture hours per week. Offered fall and spring.
  
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    COM 210 Technology for Communications

    3 Credit(s)
    This course instructs students in the digital dissemination of communications materials. The three tracks of journalism, advertising and public relations are used to provide context for understanding how and why these technologies are being applied in communications-related fields. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    COM 220 Media Literacy

    3 Credit(s)
    In this course students will use a critical perspective to become informed consumers and creators of media texts–to access, analyze, evaluate, and communicate information in print, electronic and digital formats. Issues discussed in class will address topics like the social impact of popular culture, influence of advertising on media content, mass media as a global industry, how to read the news, and media as a source of information and entertainment. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    COM 235 Multimedia Storytelling

    3 Credit(s)
    This course prepares students to a variety of media, including text, image, video, audio, and interactive platforms to tell stories across the communication discipline. Students will learn the fundamentals of storytelling, and will plan and complete projects applying these principles using a variety of digital tools. The course will also help students understand how effective storytelling works to inform, persuade and engage audiences. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    COM 250 Engaging Audiences

    3 Credit(s)
    This course focuses on further developing students’ visual literacy and knowledge of imagery and design to tell stories; how to gather, analyze and present quantitative and qualitative data; and the foundational theories and practices of audience engagement. Through experiential learning, students will further develop multimedia storytelling skills while also exploring the key ways to reach, inform and engage readers, viewers and listeners in an increasingly online and convergent media environment. Three lecture hours per week.
    Prerequisite: COM235 . Required for all Communications majors.
  
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    COM 260 Professional and Online Communication

    3 Credit(s) W OC
    This course focuses on an introduction of forms and techniques in professional communication environments including the three-step method to organization/creation of presentations, oral and online presentations, business letters, resumes, interview skills, reports, and business vocabulary. We will also examine the fundamental elements of synchronous and asynchronous communication with emphasis on interactive experiences as well as clear and consistent message construction. Written assignments will serve as the primary evaluation method for this course. Utilizing a draft/revision process, students will demonstrate critical thinking skills relevant to the course materials. Students must be comfortable working independently in a variety of online formats including online learning systems, social media, and multimedia websites. This course satisfies the oral communication core requirement. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    COM 300 Communication Research Methods

    3 Credit(s) Q
    This course provides students with a foundation in the research methods commonly used in advertising, public relations and journalism. Students will be introduced to the attitude necessary for scientific inquiry in the social sciences, as well as the capability to read and understand research reports based upon quantitative and qualitative methods, including sampling, surveys, experiments, content analysis, focus groups and critical analysis. Students will design, administer and interpret several such research tools. Required for Communications majors. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: COM100 .
  
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    COM 301 Studio Production I

    3 Credit(s)
    The course is designed to provide experiences and develop skills in the production of video content. Students will be given opportunities to plan, direct, and produce video content using studio production systems. Students will pursue topics of their own interests in the liberal arts or professional studies. Not open to students who have received credit for MEC350. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    COM 302 Video Field Production

    3 Credit(s)
    This course, based on techniques utilized in digital media production, involves the planning and production of video content with portable electronic field production equipment used on location. Included will be training in the principles and techniques of video editing and digital-based systems. Not open to students who have received credit for MEC351. Three lecture hours per week
  
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    COM 304 Mass Media and Society

    3 Credit(s) V CS
    This course offers an exploration of the role of the mass media in today’s society from a cultural studies perspective. Issues surrounding gender, race, and class are given special emphasis; other categories, such as age, family, and ability, are also considered. Attention is given to various theories that explain the relationship between mediated depictions of society and cultural ideas about different groups within society. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    COM 305 Communications: Problems of Law and Ethics in Media

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will deal with the moral and legal problems encountered by mass media since the invention of the printing press. Attention will be given to landmark events and to the historical, political and technological developments which gave rise to them. Emphasis will be placed on: the concept of legal precedent; those assumptions about the nature of man on which moral judgments are made; the evolution of libertarian thought from the First Amendment to the present. The course will rely heavily on case studies. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: COM100 , COM105 .
  
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    COM 309 Editing

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will introduce students to the theory and practice of editing for various media. Practical editing assignments will include copy and text editing, editing for print and electronic media, layout, writing headlines and cutlines, placing art and photography, as well as consideration of legal and ethical issues. Three lecture hours per week. Required for Communications majors. Limited to Communications majors and minors. Prerequisite: COM 202 .
  
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    COM 315 Communication Theory

    3 Credit(s)
    In this course we will examine ways of understanding human communication behavior from both scientific and humanistic perspectives, with applications to mass communications and social interaction. Major communication theories will be evaluated and debated. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: COM100 .
  
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    COM 316 Communications in the Global Village

    3 Credit(s) V WC
    This course is about communicating with diverse audiences. It provides theoretical foundations for understanding diversities based in language, culture, and identity and demonstrates applications in the areas of journalism, advertising, and public relations. Students will engage critically with the process of multicultural and global communications through analysis and discussion of examples across different media texts.
  
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    COM 320 Principles of Advertising and Integrated Marketing Communications

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will examine both the management and creative processes of techniques and issues in advertising as part of integrated marketing communications. Course discussion will also include social, economic and ethical aspects of advertising and the creative processes of copywriting, art, print design, and all advertising platforms. Three lecture hours per week. Limited to Communications majors and minors. Prerequisites:   and   or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    COM 321 Print Copywriting

    3 Credit(s) W W-II
    This course will deal with the planning, writing and editing of advertising copy for print media. Copy will be related to overall design, and assignments will be produced using computer layout applications. Three lecture hours per week. Required for Communications majors and minors in Advertising Communications. Limited to Communications majors and minors. Prerequisites:   and   or permission of Department Chairperson, W-I course.
  
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    COM 325 Sports Writing

    3 Credit(s)
    This discussion and writing course encourages students to develop contextual understanding of sporting activity and provides opportunities for students to practice writing about sports. Skills stressed in this course include determining newsworthiness of developments in the sports world, crafting stories with proper structure and style and editing one’s work with an eye toward publication. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite:  .
  
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    COM 333 U.S. Media History

    3.0 Credit(s) HP
    This course examines the history of the U.S. media and media institutions, situating them in the context of broader U.S. political, cultural, and technological developments, while also emphasizing the media’s contributions in these areas. Students will learn to access historical sources and apply historical methods to the study of media texts and institutions. The course considers the colonial era to the present day, encompassing developments in mass media (including newspapers, advertising, magazines, radio, and television) and social media. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    COM 335 Writing for Corporations

    3 Credit(s)
    Through workshop, lecture and discussion, this course is designed to help students develop the specialized skills needed to write on behalf of a business or non-profit organization: researching and writing the organization’s history; preparing grant proposals; creating formatted letters to be used by others; responding on behalf of the organization to individual inquiries. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: COM100  and COM105  or permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    COM 349 Principles of Public Relations

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is an introduction to the role, processes, and practices of public relations. The course will explore the concepts, theories, history, uses and techniques of public relations, as well as its foundation in rhetoric and ethics and its current applications, cases and controversies in a digitized, globalized world. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Communications majors in the Public Relations Concentration and minors in Public Relations. Limited to Communications majors and minors. Prerequisites:   and  , or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    COM 351 Public Relations Writing

    3 Credit(s) W W-II
    This course will deal with the written expression of public relations strategies, tactics and programs. Students will explore, produce, reflect on their own, and respond to the peer and instructor feedback on traditional written vehicles including news releases, pitch letters, reports and brochures, as well as new and emerging web-based and social media tools.. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Communications majors in Public Relations. Prerequisite:  .
  
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    COM 370 Fundamentals of News Writing

    3 Credit(s) W W-II
    This course covers the fundamentals of writing stories for print, digital, and emerging media. It will help students develop news writing skills across a broad range of topics for a variety of delivery platforms appropriate to both traditional and new journalism paradigms. Beat reporting, libel law, and ethical practices will also be addressed. Three lecture hours per week. Required for Communications majors in Journalism. Prerequisite:   and W-I course.
  
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    COM 371 News Reporting and Writing

    3 Credit(s)
    A continuation of COM370, this course focuses on developing students’ investigative, interviewing, and technology-assisted reporting skills. Through experiential learning, students will develop proficiency in both spot news and longer-form news analysis about diverse communities in an increasingly online and convergent media environment. Three lecture hours per week. Required for Communications majors and minors in Journalism. Prerequisite:  .
  
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    COM 401 Studio Production II

    3 Credit(s)
    This course covers advanced techniques in planning, designing and producing video content in the studio. It builds on the training and experiences developed in the prerequisites (COM301, Studio Production I and COM302, VIdeo Field Production) courses. Emphasis will be placed on producing and directing responsibilities and techniques applied to institutional, corporate and community/cable television settings. Not open to students who have received credit for MEC450. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites:   and  .
  
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    COM 402 Video Editing

    3 Credit(s)
    The focus of this course is on the development of knowledge and skills for the recording and editing of materials in digital format. Students will create, record, and edit video footage using the digital camera and editing systems. This course builds on the processes acquired in the prerequisites (COM 301 , Studio Production and COM 302 , VIdeo Field Production). Not open to students who have received credit for MEC451. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: COM 301  and COM 302 .
  
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    COM 410 Direct-to-Consumer Advertising

    3 Credit(s)
    This course, involving lectures and workshop assignments, will examine the processes for successful direct marketing. Students will be involved in the research, planning, writing and development of direct response newspaper, magazine, radio, and television ads, and of direct mail and mail order packages. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite:  .
  
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    COM 416 Advertising Campaigns

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is a practical application of the materials learned in all previously completed Advertising courses. Students will compete in a nationwide student-based advertising competition sponsored by a widely recognized corporate or advertising organization. Through team activities, they will complete all campaign requirements and meet all deadlines. Limited to Senior Communications majors, Advertising Communications concentration. Senior Advertising Communications minors with permission of Department Chairperson. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: COM 321 .
  
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    COM 421 Copywriting for Electronic Media

    3 Credit(s) W-III
    Using lectures and workshop experiences, this course involves students in the research, writing and editing of radio, television, and online advertising. Students will produce at least one audio and one video advertisement. Projects will be oriented around social marketing topics. Three lecture hours per week plus laboratory work outside of class. Required for Communications majors in the Advertising Communications concentration. Limited to Communications majors and minors. Not open to students who have received credit for COM491. Prerequisite:   or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    COM 450 Advanced Public Relations Writing

    3 Credit(s) W-III
    This course will deepen and broaden the traditional and web-based writing skills and knowledge of public relations concentrators. It will provide opportunities for students to move beyond introductory publicity and report writing. The course will cover the writing required for more challenging and complex organizational documents associated with marketing campaigns, issues management, crisis communication, speech writing, op editorials, and emerging social media tactics and tools. Students will explore, produce, and respond to their peer and instructor feedback to correct, refine and prepare them for professional PR writing environments. Three lecture hours or computer workshops per week. Prerequisites:   and   or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    COM 456 Media Relations and Publicity

    3 Credit(s)
    This course covers the essential principles and practices of media relations, which is the public relations specialty of creating, developing and maintaining successful professional, publicity-generating relationships with reporters, editors and producers of news across print and electronic media. Students will be required to write media relations-related documents, including pitch letters, media alerts and news releases; additional requirements include feature-story writing development and the ethical framing of problematic news. Limited to Communications majors and minors/Public Relations concentration. Prerequisites: COM 349  and COM 351 .
  
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    COM 466 Crisis Communication in P.R.

    3 Credit(s)
    This course covers the essential principles and practices of crisis communication. Crisis communication is the public relations specialty of anticipating, planning, organizing and communicating with the mass media and other organizational stakeholders about organizational crisis. Students will be required to learn the emerging theories guiding the ethics and strategies of crisis communication and to write critical documents, including crisis communication plans, news releases and position statements. Limited to Communications majors with a Public Relations concentration and Communications minors. Prerequisites: COM 349  and COM 351  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    COM 470 Feature Writing

    3 Credit(s) W-III
    This course teaches students to research, write, and market innovative and dynamic longer stories for newspapers, magazines, and emerging delivery platforms in the digital media. Emphasis will be on how to locate and cultivate sources, conduct in-depth interviews, and pitch and market professional work. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Communications majors in the Journalism concentration.
    Prerequisite: A W-I course, plus COM 370  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    COM 471 Public Affairs Reporting

    3 Credit(s)
    This is a course in contemporary public affairs journalism. It explores the central issues that affect our lives and teaches the investigative skills that enable journalists to research the powerful institutions and individuals that shape our communities. The course also addresses the many ways in which new technological tools empower citizen journalists and transform all previous expectations within the profession. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Communications majors in the Journalism concentration. Prerequisite:  , or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    COM 495 Special Topics in Communications

    3 Credit(s)
    This seminar will focus on special topics related to the study of Communications. May be repeated for credit (with different topic) with permission of the Department Chairperson. Limited to Communications majors and minors, or with permission of Department Chairperson. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: A minimum of nine hours of previous coursework in Communications.
  
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    COM 500 Directed Study in Communications

    3 Credit(s)
    Independent projects for Communications majors under the supervision of a member of the Communications faculty. Open only to Junior or Senior Communications majors. Permission of the Department Chairperson is required.
  
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    COM 501 Practicum in Print and Digital Journalism

    3 Credit(s)
    Students will research, write, edit, and produce print and/or digital news and feature articles for on and/or off-campus news publications. Under the terms of a practicum contract with a supervising faculty member, students will meet with the faculty member by arrangement. Emphasis will be on creating articles in a combination of print, online, photographic, audio and video formats, and working to have those articles published. Students will be expected to pitch stories for publication using query letters, demonstrate an understanding of niche markets, and be familiar with other elements of freelance writing. Limited to communication majors and minors.
    Prerequisites:
      or   or   or  .
  
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    COM 502 Communications Technology Practicum

    3 Credit(s)
    This practicum will be limited to ten students, accepted upon approval of the instructor. It is an opportunity for students to build their computer application skills and portfolios while working on campus for the Communications Department and being assigned to actual projects from the College and from the community. Students spend eight hours a week in class and seven hours a week in the lab assisting students and faculty, completing a variety of projects, and developing their own computer production skill set. Limited to Communications majors and minors.
    Prerequisites: Prerequisites: Completion of all 300-level Communications courses required of Communications majors and permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    COM 503 Communications Portfolio Seminar

    3 Credit(s)
    This capstone course will focus both on helping students reflect on and critique their body of work in the major and assisting them in the formation of their professional identities. Using materials gathered from current and previous class assignments, publications, and internships, students will create a professional portfolio suitable for presentation at job interviews in the communications industry. Three lecture hours per week. Required for B.S. in Communications. Limited to Communications majors.
    Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chairperson required.
  
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    COM 505 Internship in Communications

    3 Credit(s)
    A program designed to provide on the job experience and training in areas directly related to the student’s academic concentration in Communications. Time and services will be arranged by a contract between the student, training site, and the Department. Required for Communications majors. Limited to Communications majors. The course may be repeated with the permission of the Department Chairperson for a maximum of six credits. Prerequisites: Completion of/or completing all 300-level Communications courses, or permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    COM 506 Independent Research In Media Studies

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides students with the opportunity to conduct an independent research project in an area of special interest in the field of Media Studies. The course is subject to the availability of a faculty member with expertise in the student¿s area of interest. The supervising faculty member will serve as the research director and meet regularly with the student. Designed to accommodate one or two semester projects, the course allows the student to earn up to 6 credit hours by enrolling for two semesters. Only three of those credits can be counted as the Major Capstone Course. The course is developed collaboratively between professor and student so that it may be tailored to the individual student¿s interest. Limited to Juniors and Seniors in the Media Studies Concentration. Prerequisites:   and permission of department chairperson.
  
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    COM 507 Experiential Learning in Advertising

    3 Credit(s)
    This lecture and laboratory course involves hands-on work with clients from small businesses and non-profit organizations. Students collaborate to assist clients with their creative needs. Students analyze their team’s creative process, and how it was affected by marketing, media, and creative considerations, as well as legal and ethical issues. This culminates in student-written case studies supported by a portfolio of work completed for the client. Three lecture hours per week. Limited to Communication majors concentrating in Advertising, or others, with permission of Department Chairperson. Limited to 10 students per semester. Not open to students who have completed COM412.
    Prerequisite: Completion of all required 400-level Communication courses.
  
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    COM 508 Travel and Study Seminar

    3-6 Credit(s)


    In this study and travel course, students and faculty travel on a research trip to a location or set of locations appropriate to the course topic. The destination may be within the U.S. or an international destination. The topic varies. Variable credit (3-6 credits). May be repeated for credit with permission of Department Chairperson. Lab fee.
    Prerequisite: COM100 .

     

     

     

  
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    COM 510 Experiential Learning in Public Relations

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will provide students with the opportunity to work directly in public relations teams with real-world clients to analyze the communications needs of organizations and apply the principles of Public Relations to develop effective client relationships and deliver traditional and emerging social media materials and tools as agreed upon by teams, clients and instructors. Three lecture hours per week. Limited to Communications majors concentrating in PR, or others with permission of Department Chairperson. Limited to 10 students per semester. Not open to students who have taken COM455. 
    Prerequisites:Completion of all required 400-level Communications courses.

Criminal Justice

  
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    CRJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice

    3 Credit(s)
    An introduction to the purpose and functions of the criminal justice system. A description of the police, courts, and corrections on the local, state, and federal levels. Emphasis on the growing problems the criminal justice system has in dealing with the ills of society using a system designed to fit the needs of Colonial America. The introduction to criminal justice is of practical concern to professional personnel involved in the system and also to all citizens who want to understand better the aim of criminal law and how the criminal justice system operates. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ major requirement.
  
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    CRJ 200 Corrections

    3 Credit(s)
    This course introduces the student to the historical and philosophical development of what is commonly referred to as “the correctional system”. Special emphasis will be given to the structure, administration and nature of institutional and community corrections. Topics may include the inmate subculture, community based treatment programs, and prisoner rights, as well as the societal functions of corrections. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ major requirement.
    Prerequisite: CRJ101. Prerequisite: CRJ 101 .
  
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    CRJ 202 Rehabilitation/Habilitation of Ex-offender

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will present a summary of the approaches to community rehabilitation and an in-depth study of Reality Therapy. This course may be beneficial to students of criminal justice, psychology, social work, nursing, political science and sociology. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for CRJ Majors, Administration Concentration. Free Elective. Prerequisite: Introductory course in respective major.
  
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    CRJ 213 Administration of Criminal Justice

    3 Credit(s)
    Study in administration; analysis of the Criminal Justice organization internally and in relation to the external variables exercising organizational influence. Analyze policies and practices of agencies involved in the operations of the Criminal Justice process from the detection of crime, arrest of suspects, through prosecution, adjudication, sentencing and imprisonment. Relationships and interagency coordination required administratively throughout this procedure. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ major requirement. Prerequisite: CRJ 101 .
  
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    CRJ 221 Mediation

    3 Credit(s)
    The criminal justice technique of mediation will be developed theoretically and through case study methods. Mediation involves an independent third party who acts as facilitator in the resolution of a dispute in lieu of formal judicial intervention. The third party hears both sides of the problem and helps the disputants reach a satisfactory decision about the issue at hand. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for CRJ majors, Administration concentration. Elective for Peace Studies minor. Free Elective.
  
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    CRJ 222 Legal Anthropology: Adjudicating Conflict

    3 Credit(s)
    Primary emphasis will be on ways adversarial disputes are settled within a variety of cultures. More formal settlement procedures, cultural reactions to offenses, and examples of deviance will be included. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for CRJ majors, Administration concentration. Elective for Peace Studies minor. Free Elective.
  
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    CRJ 230 Victimology

    3 Credit(s)
    Interest in criminal victimization has increased dramatically over the last twenty years. There has been a great deal of research on victimization, legislation supporting victims, and victim programs and services. This course will explore the prevalence and etiology of victimization, types of victimization, the response of the criminal justice system, the response of victims’, victims’ programs and services, the VIctim Rights Movement and current and pending victims’ rights legislation. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for CRJ majors, Administration concentration. Free Elective. Prerequisite: CRJ 101 .
  
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    CRJ 240 Bias Crime

    3 Credit(s) V
    This course provides an overview of the issues associated with bias crime. This course focuses attention on legislative initiatives, data collection, police training and public awareness. This course also explores the role of private organizations such as the Anti-Defamation League and the Southern Poverty Law Center in tracking the activities of hate groups such as the Ku Klux Klan and Aryan Nation. Three lecture hours per week. Administration concentration elective. Prerequisite: CRJ 101 .
  
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    CRJ 250 Introduction to Criminal Investigation Procedures

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is a survey course of criminal investigation procedures that will cover crime scene analysis, interview and interrogation techniques, profiling of offenders and crime patterns. The legal and scientific considerations underlying each topic will be discussed. Three lecture hours per week. Administration concentration elective. Prerequisite: CRJ 101  or permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    CRJ 301 Community Corrections

    3 Credit(s)
    This course examines community corrections which occur within the criminal justice system but outside of the traditional correctional institutions. The student will analyze the evolution, structure and function of various community correctional components such as diversion programs, halfway houses, and drug and alcohol treatment programs. Three lecture hours per week.
    Prerequisite: CRJ 101 .
  
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    CRJ 303 Crime and the Elderly

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will offer the student an opportunity to study the criminal victimization of elderly in the United States. The family as well as public and private social institutions will be analyzed for their contribution to or deterrence of the growth of elderly victimization. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for CRJ majors, Administration concentration. Free Elective.
  
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    CRJ 311 Federal Law Enforcement Systems

    3 Credit(s)
    The organization and responsibility of federal law enforcement agencies, jurisdiction, personnel, laboratory resources of the federal agencies. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for CRJ majors, Administration concentration. Free Elective. Prerequisite: CRJ 101 .
  
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    CRJ 325 Juvenile Justice

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides a comprehensive overview of the origin, philosophy and objectives of the juvenile justice system. An extensive and systematic analysis of juvenile justice policies and practices will be undertaken, especially those reflecting the philosophical shift toward offender accountability and public safety. Topics include an examination of Supreme Court decisions and legislative reforms related to the treatment, prevention and control of juvenile delinquents. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    CRJ 330 Police Studies: Analysis and Research

    3 Credit(s)
    Police administration, organization and management will be studied in the context of current theory and research. Issues of police leadership, communication, professionalism, decision-making and job-related stress will be explored. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ major requirement. Prerequisite: CRJ 101 .
  
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    CRJ 340 Community Issues in Criminal Justice

    3 Credit(s)
    Discussion of the problems of crime as it confronts the American community and methods by which resolutions may occur. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for CRJ majors, Administration concentration. Free Elective. Prerequisite: CRJ 101 .
  
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    CRJ 345 Community Issues in Public Safety

    3.0 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to give the student an insight into the complex and dynamic relationship between the community and public safety agencies. Critical analysis and in-class discussion will be the format used to address such public safety issues as misfeasance, malfeasance, nonfeasance, public compliance with and enforcement of statutes, and current controversial issues. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for CRJ majors, Administration concentration. Free Elective.
    Prerequisite:  CRJ 101 .
  
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    CRJ 350 Introduction to Courts

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the major structures and functions of courts in the American criminal justice system. The course will analyze the formal and informal structure of the federal, state and local courts system. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for CRJ majors, minors, and Administration concentration. Prerequisite: CRJ 101 .
  
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    CRJ 355 White-collar Crime

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will move beyond criminology’s micro-level analysis of crimes in the streets to a macro-level analysis of crimes in corporate suites. The course will provide students with a comprehensive introduction to three types of “white collar crime.” (1) corporate crime; (2) occupational crime; and (3) political crime. Three lecture hours per week. Administration Elective for CRJ majors, Administration concentration. Free Elective.
  
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    CRJ 360 Racial Minorities, Crime, and Criminal Justice

    3 Credit(s) V
    This course examines racial minorities, crime and social policy in a flexible forum of discussions that evaluate criminal statistics and race; trends and issues in measuring racial involvement in crime; race and American laws; racial minorities and law enforcement; race and the criminal courts; capital punishment and race; race and the corrections system. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    CRJ 362 Theories of Crime and Justice

    3 Credit(s) W-I
    This course provides an overview of the major theories of crime and justice and helps students developing writing skills.  The causes, correlates and measures of crime will be examined, as presented in theories and empirically tested through relevant research.  Topics include the evaluation of theories and their application to criminal justice policies and programs.  Three lecture hours per week.  CRJ Major Requirement.  
    Pre-requisite: CRJ 101 .
  
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    CRJ 365 Gender and the Criminal Justice System

    3 Credit(s) V


    This course will examine the roles and behaviors of females in offending, victimization, and the workplace within the criminal justice system and will also consider diverse genders and sexuality. Course content will include the important history of women. Theoretical perspectives and research studies will be presented for criminality and victimization. The criminal justice system’s official response to the needs and rights of females and people from diverse genders will be explored. Discussion will include policy implications and legal reforms. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for CRJ majors. Free Elective.

     

  
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    CRJ 380 Criminal Profiling

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides an overview of the current use of criminal profiling within the criminal justice system. Students will examine the history, structure and function of the four main types of criminal profiling: Crime Scene Analysis, Investigative Psychology, Geographic Analysis, and Behavioral Evidence Analysis. Various facets of the profiling process will be examined, such as the psychology of the offender, crime scene analysis, and the interpretation of evidence. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: CRJ 250  or permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    CRJ 400 Criminal Justice Research I: Research Methods

    3 Credit(s) W W-III
    This course will outline the research process and will utilize criminological studies to illustrate research methods. The following will be examined: problem formulation involving topic selection, literature review, definition and operationalization of concepts, and construction of hypotheses; design of research strategy including examination of descriptive, exploratory, experimental, cross-sectional and longitudinal studies; data collection techniques; data management and analysis; and presentation of findings. The integration and application of theory, research and policy will be discussed. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ major requirement. Prerequisites: W-I course and CRJ 362 .
  
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    CRJ 401 Criminal Justice Research II: Statistics

    3 Credit(s) Q
    This is part two of a two-semester sequence integrating research methods and statistical analysis. Basic descriptive statistics, including measures of association and regression analysis will be taught. The course will introduce the student to reading and interpreting computer output, allowing them to analyze criminal justice data sets and draw general conclusions. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ major requirement. Prerequisites: CRJ 400  and Basic College Math Competency Requirement.
  
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    CRJ 402 Drugs and Crime

    3 Credit(s)
    This upper-level seminar will examine the effect that drugs, both legal and illegal, have on the criminal justice system. Critical analysis and in-class discussion will be the format used to address issues such as the effect of the “war on drugs”, the decriminalization debate, the relationship between drugs and violence, and the impact of drugs on individual users. Elective for Criminal Justice majors, Administration concentration. Free Elective. Prerequisite: CRJ 101 .
  
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    CRJ 410 Comparative Criminal Justice

    3 Credit(s)
    This course introduces students to the issues involved in comparative criminal justice. It will focus on the historical development of the laws and structure of various criminal justice systems throughout the world. Topics will include the influence of social, economic and political factors on criminal justice systems. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ major requirement.
    Prerequisite: CRJ 101 .
  
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    CRJ 431 Technology and the Criminal Justice System

    3 Credit(s)
    This upper-level seminar analyzes the influence of technological innovations on the functioning of criminal justice institutions, including the police, courts and corrections. Students will learn how the accelerated pace of technological change has affected both day-to-day operations and long-range programming priorities. The legal and ethical implications of these changes will also be addressed. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ Technology and Research concentration requirement. Administration concentration elective. Free Elective. Prerequisites: CRJ 101 .
  
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    CRJ 432 Criminal Law

    3 Credit(s)
    The historical background of criminal law: its nature, purpose and development from common law to contemporary statutory and case law will be studied. The general principles of criminal liability will be presented: the act or omission, the mens rea, criminal responsibility, defense and justification. Laws pertaining to offenses against persons, property, public order and public morals will be examined. Discussion will include commercial, white-collar and organized crime. Three lecture hours per week. CRJ major requirement. Prerequisite: CRJ 101 .
  
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    CRJ 435 Ethics in Criminal Justice Decision Making

    3 Credit(s)
    An analysis of the moral and philosophical dilemmas which criminal justice policymaking and field personnel at all levels face while carrying out their daily responsibilities. The impact of moral concerns on practical decision-making is a primary focus, and specific topics are drawn from all phases and agencies of criminal justice processing, including law enforcement, the courts and corrections. Attention also focuses on the tradeoffs involved in resolving moral dilemmas as they impact the criminal justice system, along with an overview of how future developments in the field will affect both evolving conceptions of morality and optimal problem resolution strategies. CRJ Policy and Research concentration requirement. Administration concentration elective. Prerequisite: CRJ 101 .
  
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    CRJ 520 Internship in Criminal Justice

    3 Credit(s)


    The internship affords students the opportunity to translate theory into practice, to apply and gain knowledge, and to experience directly the operations and functions of a Criminal Justice agency. This fieldwork may assist students in clarifying their career goals and exploring future employment opportunities. Interns must be available eight to ten hours per week for fieldwork and regular meetings with the internship faculty advisor. Open only to Criminal Justice Seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for    or  .

    Prerequisites: An overall GPA of at least 2.0 and a GPA of at least 2.0 in Criminal Justice.

  
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    CRJ 530 Directed Study in Criminal Justice

    3 Credit(s)
    An individualized program involving study in depth of some aspect of Criminal Justice management or research under direction of the Criminal Justice faculty. Research paper required. Students must present a proposal for approval and subsequently defend the research paper at a meeting with the Criminal Justice Committee. Open only to Criminal Justice Seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for   or  .
    Prerequisites: An overall GPA of 2.0 and a GPA of at least 2.0 in Criminal Justice.
  
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    CRJ 540 Criminal Justice Capstone

    3 Credit(s)


    This course provides students with an opportunity to reflect broadly upon their education at Salem State University and apply course materials to organizations in the criminal justice system. Specific learning acquired through academic experiences will be applied to the various agencies in criminal justice.  The course emphasizes the connection between theory and research to current practices in the field of criminal justice.  One and a half lecture hours and 6 hours field work per week.  Open only to CJ Seniors.  Not open to students who have received credit for   or  

    Prerequisite: An overall GPA of 2.0 and a GPA of 2.0 in Criminal Justice.

  
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    CRJ 580 Special Topics in Criminal Justice

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will provide students with the opportunity to address some of the latest issues in criminal justice.  Course topics will vary from semester to semester but some examples include homeland security, cybercrimes, restorative justice and gangs.  Three lecture hours per week.  The course may be repeated once for credit.  Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing, 12 hours Criminal Justice or permission of department chairperson.

Computer Science

  
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    CSC 105 Survey of Computer Science

    4 Credit(s)


    This course provides an overview of fundamental areas within the field of Computer Science, introducing basic vocabulary, central concepts, and typical applications. The areas surveyed include computer hardware, computer arithmetic, operating systems, programming constructs, programming languages, information storage and retrieval, networking, intelligent systems, computer graphics, and the social context of computing. Four lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the Basic Mathematics Competency Based Skills requirement and the ability to use standard computer software (e.g., operating system features, word processing, email, and web browsers).

     

 

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