Dec 03, 2021  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

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Geological Sciences

  
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    GLS 155 Age of Dinosaurs

    3 Credit(s) DII SR
    The Age of Dinosaurs will expose students to scientific inquiry focusing on current scientific theories and controversies surrounding the evolution and extinction of dinosaurs.  The course will emphasize the analysis and interpretation of geological and paleontological data and information as a way of introducing students to earth system history, plate tectonics, surface geology, sedimentary processes, fossilization, evolution, and related topics so that the geological and evolutionary processes that have affected the dinosaurs can be explored.
  
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    GLS 170H Honors Physical Geology w/Lab

    4 Credit(s) DII SR SRL
    How does the Earth work?  Why are the Rocky Mountains in the western U.S.?  Why is Old Faithful in Yellowstone National Park?  Could there be volcanoes on the east coast?  Could there be tsunamis? The answers to those questions and more are answered in this course which takes a web-enhanced, project-oriented approach to the study of the Earth.  Open only to Honors students or students with at least a GPA of 3.5, not open to students who have received credit for GLS100 . Three lecture hours and two hours of laboratory per week.
  
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    GLS 171H Honors Evolving Earth

    4 Credit(s) DII SR SRL
    This course exposes students to scientific inquiry through an exploration of the fascinating and ever-changing evolution of Earth and its inhabitants.  The scientific methods and analytical skills used to interpret the history of our planet will be practiced in class and lab through the use of interactive exercises and assignments that utilize geological resources such as real-world data, state of the art analytical equipment, and internet resources. Students will be given the opportunity for independent research of past geologic events, class presentations, and the chance to learn from one another. In laboratory, students will work with ancient rocks and fossils and geological maps to uncover the past. One weekend field trip required. Three lecture hours and two hours of laboratory per week.  Open only to Honors students. Not open to students who have received credit for GLS 102 Prerequisite: Honors Program.
  
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    GLS 199 Special Topics in Earth Science

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is an intensive examination of specialized topics in Earth Science. The emphasis of the course will be interesting and current questions in Earth Science. The topic and instructor will be announced prior to registration. This course may be repeated once for credit. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    GLS 210 Geomorphology

    4 Credit(s) DII Q W-II
    This course is an experiential-based and writing intensive course that focuses on the role of structure, lithology and process in the evolution of landscapes.  Three lecture hours and three hours of laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite: GLS 100  or other introductory GLS class with lab or permission of Department Chairperson, Level-I Written Communications Course.
  
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    GLS 212 Geological Oceanography

    3 Credit(s) DII Q
    Introduction to the geology and geophysics of the oceans emphasizing mechanisms and processes operating in the marine realm. A broad spectrum of marine geology subjects will be covered including the structure, geophysics, rocks, sediments, microfossils, stratigraphy, and history of the ocean basins and margins. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite:   or permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 213 War and Geology

    3 Credit(s) DII SR
    This course will explore the importance of effects of geology on the course of human conflicts.  From Marathon to Simon Bolivar’s epic campaigns in the Andes to the deserts and mountains of the Middle East, geology has played a critical role in the success or failure of military operations.  Students will learn basic concepts of geology and terrain analysis and apply those concepts to the analysis of military operations on both tactical and strategic levels.  This will be accomplished using case studies and examples of selected operations.  A one day field trip is required.  Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    GLS 214 Beaches and Coasts

    4 Credit(s) DII
    This course is a study of beaches, coasts and the factors that govern their form and variability from tectonics to hydrographic regime. Additional foci will include beach dynamics, coastal hazards related to erosion, and the effect of human intervention along the coast. Three lecture hours and three hours of lab per week. Limited to 16 students. Prerequisite: GLS 102  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 221 Mineralogy

    4 Credit(s) DII
    Mineral properties and occurrences, hand specimen mineralogy and optical mineralogy of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic minerals as well as symmetry, crystallography and atomic structure of minerals are covered in a project-oriented experiential format. Three lecture hours and three hours of laboratory per week. Local field trips either during the school week or on the weekend. Prerequisite: GLS 100  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 222 Gemology

    3 Credit(s) DII
    The properties, identification, origin, evaluation, and preparation of gem stones and gem materials. Three lecture hours per week. Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: GLS 100  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 225 Estuaries and Pollution

    3 Credit(s) DII
    Estuaries are coastal water bodies that have important economic, ecologic, and aesthetic value; however, many are currently being adversely affected by pollution. This class is designed to introduce the dynamics of estuaries in order to understand the interactions between the geosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere in these coastal water bodies. These systems will be investigated with regard to current natural and human influences on New England’s estuaries. An optional field trip will be offered to expose students to environments discussed in class. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: GLS 100  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 231 Earth System Cycles

    3 Credit(s) DII Q
    This course presents geochemical cycles of the major geochemical components of rocks, water, air and life as they occur naturally and as they are perturbed by humans. The course represents an integrated approach to global geochemistry and environmental problems. Topics covered include: the water cycle, the greenhouse effect, rain water, atmospheric chemistry, chemical weathering and water chemistry of rivers, lakes, marginal marine environments, estuaries, and the oceans. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: GLS100  or permission from the Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 235 Forensic Geology

    4 Credit(s) DII Q
    This course is intended for both geology and non-geology majors. It provides a useful and practical approach to the forensic value of earth materials. Students will learn both from lecture and from experiential activities about the ideas, methods, applications and handling of earth materials for forensic purposes. Guest lecturers will add another dimension to class work. Two two-hour sessions of integrated lecture and related activities per week. Prerequisite: GLS 100  or GLS 135  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 237 Medical Geology

    3 Credit(s) DII
    Medical Geology addresses geological materials and processes that affect human health and the health of other animals. Topics covered include: Toxicology, exposure and risk assessment; arsenic, selenium and heavy metals; radon; fluoride; hydrocarbons; dusts and soils: saline environments; volcanic emissions; and waste disposal. Current examples and studies will be used to facilitate classroom discussion. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    GLS 240 Geodynamics

    3 Credit(s)
    This course focuses on the understanding of the thermal and mechanical aspects of lithospheric deformation and evolution. Course covers topics that influence geodynamic processes, including mantle convection; lithospheric heat transfer; plate boundaries, body forces, and the dynamics of Earth’s lithosphere; lithospheric rheology; and orogenesis. Three lecture hours per week.  
  
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    GLS 245 Lakes and Environmental Change

    3 Credit(s) DII
    This course will provide a background on natural lake processes so that students will be able to identify both natural and human-made perturbations to lake systems. The first part of the course will examine modern-day geologic, physical, chemical, and biologic processes in lakes. In the second part of the course, this knowledge will be applied to the sediment record to understand geologic records of past environmental and climate change. Case studies will be utilized, and a field trip may be required. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: GLS 100  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 253 Geochemistry

    3 Credit(s)
    This course covers the origin of the elements and their geological significance. Processes affecting the evolution of the Earth’s crust and the distribution of the elements in rocks, sediments, soils and waters; geochemical cycles. Students produce computer-generated graphs in regularly assigned projects throughout the semester. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for GLS353. Prerequisite:   or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 295 Climate Change in the Geologic Record

    3 Credit(s) DII
    This course examines how the geologic record is used to document and understand the history of the climate system. A multidisciplinary approach is used to explore the climate responses of Earth’s major systems (ice, water, air, vegetation, and land) as they developed through earth history. The course will emphasize the interconnection of data, theory, and theory testing within the context of a climate system changing across a broad range of time scales. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: GLS 100  or GPH 100P  or permission of Department Chairperson; GLS 102  recommended.
  
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    GLS 322 Petrology

    4 Credit(s)
    Basic concepts and principles related to the genesis and evolution of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks, their relation to plate tectonics and magmatic processes are studied through a combination of lectures and interspersed experiential activities. Activities include rock classification and identification using hand specimens, thin and polished sections, as well as interpretations of phase, discrimination and other types of descriptive diagrams in a project-oriented, experiential format. Three lecture hours and three hours of laboratory per week. Local required field trips during the school week or weekend. Prerequisite: GLS 221  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 328 Special Topics in Geology

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is an examination of specialized topics in Geology. The emphasis of the course will be current geologic questions or new avenues of geologic research using primary scientific literature. The topic and instructor will be announced prior to registration. This course may be repeated once for credit. Three lecture hours per week. Open only to majors in Geological Sciences, all concentrations.
  
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    GLS 330 Paleontology

    4 Credit(s)
    Introduction to the fossil record. Emphasis is on the description and classification of fossils and use of paleontological data to understand the principles of paleoecology, evolution, and biostratigraphy. Three lecture hours and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: BIO101 or BIO103, GLS 102  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 334 Sedimentation and Stratigraphy

    4 Credit(s)
    Introduction to the properties of sediments, sedimentary rocks, sedimentary rock sequences, and the principles of stratigraphic correlation. Emphasis is on examining the dynamics of recent sedimentary environments to establish what sediments would look like in the stratigraphic record. In laboratory, students are introduced to techniques of sediment analysis and the classification and identification of sedimentary rocks. Three lecture hours and three hours of laboratory per week. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: GLS 102 , GLS 210 , or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 337 Sedimentary Petrology and Petrography

    4 Credit(s)
    This course is intended to serve as an in-depth investigation into the genesis, classification and interpretation of sedimentary rocks. Students learn to analyze and collect data from both hand samples and thin sections, and to interpret that data for classification, provenance and tectonic setting. Theoretical information will enable them to understand the geological significance of sedimentary rock distribution. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: GLS 102  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 341 Structural Geology and Tectonics

    4 Credit(s)
    The study of the processes by which deformation of the earth occurs, and the interpretation of the structures produced by these processes-from submicroscopic to global scales. Three lecture hours and three hours of laboratory per week; occasional local and/or regional field trips (may be during the school week or weekends) may be required. Prerequisites: GLS 100 , MAT202N or equivalent, or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 343 Introduction to Geophysics

    4 Credit(s)
    This course is an introduction to seismology, earthquake mechanics, geomagnetism, gravity and terrestrial heat flow. All aspects of the course will be related to global plate tectonics. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week; occasional local field trips (may be during the school week or weekends) may be required. Prerequisite: GLS 102  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 345 Geological Engineering

    3 Credit(s)
    The application of Geology to the solution of civil engineering problems. Emphasis on recognition and measurement of rock, soil, and hydrologic parameters for use in site evaluation, design, analysis, and construction. Controlling factors and recognition of geologic hazard potential. Three lecture hours per week. Offered alternate years. Prerequisites: GLS 210 , GLS 341 , MAT202N or MAT210 or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 349 Geoarcheology

    3 Credit(s) DII Q
    The use of earth science concepts, methods, equipment and knowledge in the direct solution of problems in archeology. The course will introduce students to the use of earth science methods in resolving archeological problems associated with artifact identifications, integrity of artifact sets, chronological context, paleolandscape habitat, and human-environment interactions. Students will learn the use and geoarcheological application of sophisticated field equipment such as Total Stations, GPS, and remote sensing methods. A one day local field trip is required. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    GLS 351 Energy and Natural Resources in the Earth

    3 Credit(s)
    This course covers the occurrence, origin, and exploitation of ore minerals, petroleum, coal and other economic materials. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: GLS 102  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 352 Petroleum Geology

    3 Credit(s) DII
    Physical and chemical nature, origin, migration, and trapping of fluid hydrocarbons. Source rocks, “pipelines”, reservoir rocks, exploration techniques. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: GLS 100  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 356 Hydrology

    4 Credit(s) DII Q
    This course is intended to serve as a core in the basics of surface and groundwater hydrology for environmental science majors. Students taking this course should gain a useful understanding of hydrologic theory and some basic skills used in hydrologic data gathering and analysis. Problem solving, short in-class activities and laboratory projects related to lecture material will enhance the student’s understanding of hydrologic concepts. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: CHE 130 , GLS 102 , GLS 210  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 357 Environmental Geology

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is an applied approach to environmental problems. We will focus on New England by expanding on preexisting theoretical knowledge with field trips and projects which emphasize local materials, i.e. glacial deposits, harbor sediments, crystalline rocks, and local problems. This is a lab and field oriented course intended to sharpen theory with practice. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Field trips required, 1 weekend and several to local sites. Prerequisite: GLS 253  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 362 New England Geology

    3 Credit(s) DII
    This course explores the bedrock and glacial geology of New England and adjacent regions. Major structural belts, stratigraphy, and tectonic models for past orogenic events are investigated as well as the impact of bedrock geology and geologic structures on New England’s landscape. One or two weekend field trips will be required. Three lecture hours per week.
    Prerequisite: GLS 102  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 372 Surveying I

    4 Credit(s)
    A lecture and laboratory study to provide theoretical knowledge and practical field experience in surveying and mapping. Specific topics to be covered are: linear measurement, leveling, angular measurement, traverse surveys, record keeping, note reduction, office calculations and adjustments, and plotting a traverse. Field operations will constitute an essential part of the course. Three lecture hours and three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: MAT202N, MAT 205  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 380 Applied Environmental Geophysics

    4 Credit(s)
    This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of geophysical methods currently used to help solve environmental problems. Methods covered include seismic refraction and reflection, gravity, magnetic, electrical resistivity, electromagnetics, ground-penetrating radar, and radioactivity surveys. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours per week; occasional local field trips (may be during the school week or weekends) may be required. Prerequisite: GLS 210  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 400 Directed Studies in the Earth Sciences

    1-4 Credit(s)
    Field, laboratory and/or library research in the Earth Sciences. Independent study in the student’s field of interest under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member. Prerequisites: GLS 102  and permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 470 Field Geology I

    1-6 Credit(s)
    This course covers the application of geological field methods including mapping, structural interpretation, surveying, and stratigraphic section measurement and interpretation to the production of geological maps. Several projects stress environmental applications. This course is field based and requires the student to work outdoors at various sites in the Northeast and the Yellowstone Plateau in Montana/Wyoming. Transportation to and from the field areas is provided, additional fee required for field expenses. This course is offered only through the School of Continuing and Professional Studies. Repeatable for credit to a maximum of six credits.
    Prerequisites  or GLS201 and one other upper division (200-300-400) Geology course or permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 485 Field Geology II

    3 Credit(s) Q W
    This course is a study/field course designed around a specific field experience. The course combines one to two weeks of classroom lecture and laboratory work with a 1 to 3 week field trip to an area specific to the course content. Topic varies. Is repeatable once for credit. Field fee may be required. Prerequisite  and permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 499 Internship in Earth Science

    3-9 Credit(s)
    An academic work program under the auspices of various business, non-profit or governmental organizations in areas directly related to the student’s area of academic interest in Earth Science. The student will gain practical field and/or laboratory experience. The internship must be coordinated by a faculty member working in conjunction with the chosen organization. Open only to Junior and Senior Geology majors. Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 500 Senior Research in Geology I

    3-4 Credit(s)
    This course requires the completion of a substantial research project on a geologic problem or topic under the supervision of an appropriate faculty member. Methods of research, organization, preparation, and presentation of data will be discussed, but the objective is a completed thesis by the student. Open only to Senior Geological Sciences majors by permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    GLS 501 Senior Research in Geology II

    3-4 Credit(s) W-III
    This course is a continuation of GLS 500  for those students who wish to further pursue their geologic research, particularly in anticipation of publication. Prerequisites: GLS 500 . Written Communications Level II (W-II).

Healthcare Studies

  
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    BHS 101 Healthcare in the US

    3 Credit(s) PGR
    This course introduces a student to the history, structure, and characteristics of the American healthcare system including the delivery of healthcare services, service settings, healthcare financing, insurance, and the roles and responsibilities of healthcare providers and professionals. Students will establish skills and knowledge needed to become more informed healthcare consumers and to comprehend the complexities of the current healthcare system, healthcare practice guidelines, and ethical practices. Three lecture hours per week. Required of all BHS majors and minors.
  
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    BHS 107 Technology in Healthcare

    3 Credit(s)


    This course exposes students to a variety of technological methods and media used in healthcare. Students develop an appreciation of the value of technology used in healthcare. Such topics as robotics, presentation approaches to consumers and professionals, electronic records, and telehealth are explored. Students learn how to evaluate technology and its potential uses in a range of contexts. Three lecture hours per week. Required for the BHS major and minor.

     

  
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    BHS 203 Healthcare Seminar

    2 Credit(s)
    This seminar course builds on BHS 101 and 102 to facilitate each student’s development of an academic and professional plan fostering an identification of a targeted area(s) of interest within the healthcare arena.Prerequisite: BHS101 . Must have completed 24 credits. Limited to students in the BHS major.
  
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    BHS 230 Academic and Professional Writing in Healthcare

    3 Credit(s)
    The purpose of this course is to strengthen and encourage the use of skills that students require for successful academic and professional writing in healthcare disciplines. Development of information health literacy skills and language including medical terminology will be covered. Students will learn various aspects of personal and scholarly professional writing including APA style. Course consists of writing and revision after instructor and/or peer review. Three lecture hours per week. Required for BHS majors. Prerequisite: W-I
  
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    BHS 247 Statistics for the Healthcare Professional

    3 Credit(s) QR
    This introductory course provides the students with statistical concepts and models used to analyzing health care research and data. Students will explore statistical methods for establishing correlations, interpreting trends, conducting time series analysis, and predictions. Probability and sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, effect size, and statistical power will be examined from a theoretic perspective. Students will be prepared to critically examine research articles and utilize evidence based practice. Required for the BHS major.
  
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    BHS 270 Understanding Diversity and Cultural Competence in Human Services

    3 Credit(s)
    The purpose of this course is to explore the meaning and implementation of culture competence in a social work context. Various aspects of human and social diversity will be explored, including but not limited to race, ethnicity, social class, and gender. The psychological and institutional cause and consequences of discrimination and oppression on a wide-range of populations are analyzed. Strength-based strategies for interacting with clients in human service agencies who have been victims of oppression and discriminatory policies are discussed. Readings, class discussions, and experiences aim to assist students in developing culturally competent social work values and techniques. Required of all Social Work majors and minors. Prerequisites: SOC 110  and PSY 101  or approval of Department Chairperson.
  
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    BHS 302 Health Policy

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides an introduction to contemporary issues in American and global healthcare policy. Students will gain an understanding of the public policy process and the role of various stakeholders in shaping policy. The impact of healthcare policy at the local, state, national, and global level will be examined. Strategies to engage in healthcare advocacy are presented. Three lecture hours per week. Required for BHS major and minors.
  
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    BHS 320 Cornerstone To Healthcare Professions

    2 Credit(s)
    This course provides students the opportunity to reflect on past learned knowledge and construct an understanding that will lead toward the development of future professional goals and skill.  Specifically, the course will guide students through a process of identifying internship or employment sites of interest, preparing applications and accepting documents, securing an appropriate internship/employment placement and fostering development of knowledge, skills and abilities pertinent to successful internships and/or employment.  Required of Healthcare Studies majors with junior year status and academic good standing.  This course will be graded Pass/Fail only.  Taken the semester prior to BHS 520 Internship in BHS.  Two lecture hours per week. Required of Healthcare Studies Majors.
  
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    BHS 401 Health and Disability Across the Lifespan

    3 Credit(s)
    The life expectancy of individuals with disabilities is expanding. There is a growing trend that many more individuals in the US will face greater challenges and consume more healthcare services in the future. It is vital that healthcare providers understand how different challenges affect a person’s abilities throughout their lifetime. Topics of discussion will include understanding ability versus disability, an overview of common disabilities that impact an individual’s function over time, legislative and policy issues that impact service, the history of disability care in the US, and healthcare promotion and prevention. Required for the BHS major and minor.
  
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    BHS 402 Principles of Leadership and Management in Healthcare

    3 Credit(s)
    This course introduces students to the process of leadership and how it is conducted in a variety of settings. Theoretical  constructs of leadership as well as practical applications will be presented, Students will learn about effective teach building, management strategies and structures and develop a personal leadership/management plan. Required for the BHS major and minor.
  
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    BHS 407 Introduction to Healthcare Research

    3 Credit(s) W-III
    This WIII course is designed to enable the student to understand the interrelationship between research and practice. Emphasis is placed on the the examination of research methodology, the critical appraisal of published research, and the integration of research into evidence-based practice. The course builds on the skills developed in BHS230 , helping students strengthen their writing abilities in the healthcare field. Students will compose in various genres related to the industry such as a research proposal, abstract and annotated bibliography. Required of BHS majors. Three lecture hours a week and work outside of class. Prerequisites: BHS247  or OCT247  Statistics for the Healthcare Professional or approved statistics class, and completion of a WII course.
  
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    BHS 410 Special Topics in Healthcare Studies

    1-3 Credit(s)
    This course will focus on special topics related to Healthcare Studies. The topic and instructor will be announced prior to registration. This course may be repeated for credit with different topics and with permission of the Department Chairperson. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    BHS 495 Senior Project in Healthcare Studies

    3 Credit(s) W-III
    Students select an area of study in cooperation with the course advisor and/or program director. The project may include conference attendance, grant proposal development, pilot study and/or planning documents. A comprehensive paper will be developed and delivered in current APA format. Student must receive departmental and advisor approval for permission to register for this course. Only open to BHS majors. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: BHS230 , BHS247 or approved statistics course,BHS407 .
  
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    BHS 499 Directed Study in Healthcare Studies

    1-3 Credit(s)
    This course provides a guided opportunity for students to have a directed study developed in conjunction with a faculty advisor. An advanced student may require a directed study to continue independent research to complete their capstone project. The directed study activity must be approved by the program director and meet the department requirements. Students are required to have regular meetings with their faculty advisor. Open only to BHS majors. Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    BHS 520 Internship in Healthcare Studies

    3 Credit(s)
    This course affords students the opportunity to translate theory into practice, apply and gain knowledge, build collegial relationships, and experience directly the operations and functions within a healthcare setting.  This fieldwork may assist students in clarifying their career goals and exploring future employment opportunities.  Students will work under the supervision of a worksite supervisor during the internship.  Ten hours/week within a minimum of a 2 day/week site schedule and 120 total hours is required. Regular supervisory meetings with Healthcare Studies faculty is also required.  Open only to Healthcare Studies seniors of academic good standing.

History

  
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    HST 101 World History I

    3 Credit(s) DIII V HP WC
    A systematic study of the major patterns of global history from its origins through the early modern period. Analyzes the distinguishing characteristics of the world’s major pre-modern civilizations and the relationships and points of cultural exchange among them. Examines the historical roots of many of the world’s diverse cultural traditions. This course develops critical thinking, writing and analytical skills. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS101.
  
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    HST 102 World History II

    3 Credit(s) DIII V HP WC
    A systematic study of the major patterns of global history in the modern period. Analyzes the distinguishing characteristics of the world’s major civilizations, and the gradual integration of the diverse cultures of the world into an interconnected system. This course develops critical thinking, writing, and analytical skills. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 104 Conquest, Slavery and Revolution in the Atlantic World

    3 Credit(s) HP WC


     

     

     

    This course examines the interconnected history of the Atlantic World that took place on the ocean and on four continents from the age of exploration in the fifteenth century to the abolition of slavery in the nineteenth century.  This collision of old worlds produced conflict but in the process it would ultimately create an interconnected community of diverse peoples and cultures, the beginnings of globalization.  The course will consider a wide range of topics including exploration, colonization, commerce, migration, slavery, creole societies, revolution and piracy.  Three lecture hours per week.

     

  
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    HST 105 Colonialism and the Making of the Modern World

    3 Credit(s) HP WC
     

    Through film, fiction, history, and reporting, this course will look at how colonialism shaped the divided world we live in today.  We will discuss political, economic, cultural, and environmental impacts of colonialism and the development of underdevelopment.  Three lecture hours per week.

  
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    HST 106 Global History Since 1900

    3 Credit(s) hp wc
     

    This course is an introduction to world history since 1900.  Students will examine topics and themes in modern history and explore the diverse cultural, social, political and economic transformations leading to our increasingly globalized world.  Topics may include capitalism, colonialism, anti-colonialism, race, democracy, world war, nationalism, ethnicity, genocide, the Cold War, human rights, technological development and globalization,  Three lecture hours per week.

  
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    HST 107 The United States in World History

    3 Credit(s) HP WC
     

    This course explores the transnational history of the United States in the modern global era.  Students will examine the roots of globalization, from the earliest migrations across the erring Straits, the origins and development of colonial and imperialism, up through the foundations of the modern “American empire”.  They will explore the dominant historical themes that trace the origins and development of the hemisphere’s encounters, connections, and relationships with the peoples and environments of Asia, Africa, and Europe.  Three lecture hours per week.

  
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    HST 108 War and Society inWorld History

    3 Credit(s) HP WC
     

    This course explores war from antiquity to present as a cultural, social, and political phenomenon,  the course emphasizes the influence of ideological and religious factors on attitudes towards was, the relationship between war and social change, the interaction and exchange of cultures the is often  produced by war, the links binding war and technology with political power and economics, and the historic and seminal influence of was on the creative and expressive realms of art, cinema, and literature.

  
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    HST 109H Honors World History

    3 Credit(s) DIII HP
    This course examines themes in world history focusing on patterns of interaction, comparative developments, the diffusion of ideologies and technologies, and the formation of a global community. Course themes will vary with instructor, but be placed in a global context continuously. Readings, discussions, and source analysis will aid in the assessment of historical phenomena from varied perspectives. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 111H Freshman Honors History II

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    In-depth study of a topic or topics dealing with the emergence of the “Modern” world since the 17th century. Specific matters to be examined will vary. Stress will be placed upon student participation in the consideration of the nature, operation, and interaction of major historical forces. Fulfills half of the All-College core requirement in History. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS111H. Prerequisite: Restricted to students enrolled in the Honors Program.
  
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    HST 112 Introduction to LGBTQ History

    3.0 Credit(s)
    This course is an introduction to the study of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender intersex, and queer histories; this course is also a first-level writing course. Focusing on the national as well as the global, this course takes an interdisciplinary approach in pulling together various artifacts and texts to fully investigate LGBTQ history, experiences identities, and cultures. The interdisciplinary approach facilitates instruction in foundational critical reading and writing practices including the ability to summarize, paraphrase, evaluate, analyze, and synthesize texts. Three lecture hours.
  
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    HST 128 Global Societies and Cultures

    3 Credit(s) CS WC
    This course studies global societies and cultures. The course analyzes social and cultural transformations at various stages of the modern era. It pays particular attention to the cultural continuations, social changes, and global interactions around the world. Relating to students’ own cultural backgrounds, this course guides the students to develop comparative views of all cultures. Through evidence-based learning, this course leads the students to understand why social relations and social institutions generally reflect cultural norms as well as how deviations take place that aim at establishing new societies based upon new cultures.
  
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    HST 200 Historiography

    3 Credit(s) W-II
    The course is an introduction to philosophies of history and recent developments in methodology, with consideration given to interpretative trends and conflicting schools of historical writing. Students are required to complete an historiographical project. Required of all History majors. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS402 or who have taken HIS290. Prerequisite: Level I Written Communication (W-I) course.
  
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    HST 204 U.S. History and Constitutional Government I

    3 Credit(s) DIII HP
    This course traces the development of the United States from the colonial period to the end of the Civil War, surveying the economic, political, social and cultural aspects of this development. Constitutional development at the national and state levels will be explored, with particular emphasis on the Massachusetts experience. This course provides the matrix for courses in American Literature, Education, Economics, Government and Sociology. Three lecture hours per week. Fulfills Massachusetts’s teacher certification American Government requirement. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS204.
  
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    HST 205 U.S. History and Constitutional Government II

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Traces the development of the United States from 1865 to its present status as a world power, analyzing the economic, political, social and cultural factors. The functioning of American federal and state constitutions is analyzed. Provides the knowledge and understanding needed by teachers and by professionals who may interact with the public sector. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS205.
  
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    HST 208 History of American Constitutions

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Traces the development of constitutionalism in British North America and analyzes its culmination in the constitutions of Massachusetts and the United States. The material studied is considered in the light of both contemporary government and Supreme Course decisions. Three lecture hours per week. Fulfills Massachusetts’s teacher certification American Government requirement. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS208.
  
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    HST 210 Legal History

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    A one-semester course examining the historical development of the fundamental concepts of Anglo-American law. These concepts include subject areas covered in the first year law school curricula: real and personal property, torts, contracts, criminal law, courts and procedural rules. The substantive and procedural aspects of the common law are traced and the significance of the developments in statutory law is explained. The historical background of modern landlord-tenant statutes and of consumer law remedies is also covered. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS210.
  
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    HST 211 Civil Rights in American History

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    A study of individual and group rights in American History. The course traces the significance of status, race, sex and other classifications in American law from the colonial era through modern constitutional debate. The course emphasizes the development of equal protection and fundamental rights law. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS211.
  
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    HST 216 History of the African American I

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Traces African American roots from the early kingdoms in West Africa to the American Civil War. Emphasis will be placed on the socio-historical processes that account for the status of Blacks in American society and the New World. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS326.
  
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    HST 217 History of the African American II

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Analysis of the period from Reconstruction to the present. Special emphasis will be put on the role of charismatic Black leaders and theoreticians of the 1920’s and their impact on the development of the ideologies of the 1960’s. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS327.
  
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    HST 218 U.S. Women’s History

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    U.S. Women’s History presents women’s history both as an integral part of United States history and as a distinct subject of historical inquiry. Using a variety of sources, this course will explore the public and private lives of U.S. women of different class, racial, ethnic, and religious backgrounds from the colonial period to the present. The course will also introduce students to the methodology of women’s history. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS363 or HIS363A.
  
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    HST 237 History of the Middle East

    3 Credit(s) DIII WC
    An introduction to the history and culture of the Middle East from the rise of Islam in the seventh century to the present. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS301.
  
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    HST 238 Survey of Latin America

    3 Credit(s) DIII V HP
    This course explores Latin American history from pre-Columbian times to the present, covering indigenous societies and conquest. Also covered are Spanish and Portuguese colonial rule, independence, integration in the world economy in the nineteenth century, and the development of industry and agriculture in the twentieth. We examine political, social and economic structures, stressing the perspectives of poor majorities in Latin America.
  
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    HST 239 History of Latinos in the United States

    3 Credit(s) DIII V
    This course examines the history of the different Latino populations of the United States, beginning with U.S. expansion in the nineteenth century. We explore the history of Mexicans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans and Central Americans in the United States in the context of U.S. relations with the sending countries (Mexican-American War, Spanish-American War, Dominican and Central American occupations), and changes over time in U.S. society and economy. The historical construction of race and ethnicity, gender, and changing forms of identities is also examined. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS380.
  
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    HST 240 History of China

    3 Credit(s) DIII V HP WC
    The course covers the Chinese civilization from ancient to modern times. It summarizes major historical events; stresses the internal and external struggles of China; concentrates on politics, economy, culture, and society; and analyzes China’s role in international affairs. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS304.
  
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    HST 241 History of the Far East

    3 Credit(s) DIII HP WC
    Surveys the early cultures of East Asia, religious beliefs and social customs. Concentrates upon China and Japan, the emergence of the United States and Russia as Asian powers, World War II and the wars in Korea and Vietnam. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS302.
  
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    HST 242 History of Japan

    3 Credit(s) DIII V HP WC
    This course provides a general historical coverage of Japan. It discusses Japanese political changes, economic development, and cultural transformation. The course searches for answers to the fundamental questions regarding the essence of the Japanese society. In a time when the roads are filled with Japanese cars, it is also necessary to understand the people who contribute to making Japan an important country in both Asia and the world. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS385.
  
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    HST 250 History of Africa I

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course presents the account of: ancient history of Africa, the Arab conquest, modern changes in North Africa, tribal life south of the Sahara, impact of European imperialism, contemporary developments in the emerging nations. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS330.
  
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    HST 251 History of Africa II

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course is concerned with modern African history with emphasis on the rise and fall of the European colonial empires, and the emergence of the new African states. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS331.
  
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    HST 256 Modern India

    3 Credit(s) DIII V HP WC
    Through lecture and discussion, the student is introduced to major events and themes in the modern history of India, from the rise of the Mughal Empire in the 16th century to the colonial period of the late 18th and 19th centuries, the decades of the freedom struggle in the early 20th century, and the rapid political and socio-economic changes that have occurred since partition and independence in 1947.  The course emphasizes, in addition to important political changes, aspects of cultural and economic history.Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have taken HIS 396.
  
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    HST 269 Introduction to European History

    3 Credit(s) DIII HP
    The course introduces students to the European experience by examining broad historical themes. Emphasis will be placed on how historians have organized and interpreted major developments throughout various periods in European history. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS220.
  
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    HST 270 Medieval Europe

    3 Credit(s) DIII HP
    This course covers the history of Europe from the time of the fall of the Roman Empire to the invading Germanic, Slavic, and Hunnic tribes, to the time of the Renaissance with its major contributions to civilization. Three lecture hours per week. Offered in alternate years. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS306.
  
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    HST 271 Renaissance and Reformation

    3 Credit(s) DIII HP CEA
    Studies the changes in European culture, religion, economics, and politics from the 15th through the 17th centuries. The art, literature, and economic evolution of the Renaissance, as well as the theological and political differences of the Protestant and Catholic Reformations will be stressed. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS307.
  
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    HST 272 History of France Since 1763

    3 Credit(s) DIII HP W-II
    Covers the political and economic as well as social developments from 1763 to the present. Beginning with the era of the French Revolution, the course will introduce students to the events which have shaped contemporary France. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS333.
  
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    HST 273 History of Modern Germany

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    A survey of modern German History. Examines the complexities of modernIzation during the Bismarkian and Wilhelmine eras, Germany’s role in World War I, the “crisis years” of Weimar, the social, cultural and political dimensions of Nazism, the Third Reich and the Holocaust; the nature of a divided Germany and the implications of reunification in the contemporary era. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS334A. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS334B.
  
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    HST 274 Contemporary European History

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Surveys European history from 1914, including World War I, the period between the wars, World War II, and the Cold War, focusing on political, economic, social, and cultural developments. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS309A.
  
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    HST 275 Irish History

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    A survey of Irish culture and history from the pre-Christian to the modern period. Three lecture hours per week. Students who have received credit for HIS340, HIS341, or HIS342 may not receive credit for HIS275.
  
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    HST 276 Science and Society in Renaissance Europe

    3 Credit(s) HP
    This course surveys the development of scientific inquiry from the fifteenth century to the era of Newton, placing emerging scientific ideas in their social and cultural context. Debates about the nature of the universe, observations of the natural world, medical theories and practice and the transition from alchemy to chemistry will be examined, as will the gradual development of new methodologies and institutions. Emphasis will be placed on the coincidental processes of global and scientific exploration.
  
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    HST 277 England to the 17th Century

    3 Credit(s) DIII HP
    A survey of English life from the Roman invasion to the death of Elizabeth I. Analysis of major political and economic developments. Particular emphasis placed on social history from Chaucer’s time to that of Shakespeare to provide a background for the study of English literature. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS350.
  
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    HST 279 Russian History

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    The development of Russia from Pre-Kievan and Kievan time to the establishment of Soviet Russia. The student is encouraged to build an understanding of modern Russia by pursuing appropriate readings. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS310.
  
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    HST 281 The Cultural Revolution, Tiananmen Movement, and Economic Growth in Contemporary China

    3 Credit(s) CS WC
    This course provides an overview of contemporary China. It examines the political changes, economic progresses, and cultural transformations in recent and current China. Focusing on three most important events as case studies, the course tries to lead the students into a strongly evidence-based understanding of the origins, developments, and consequences of these important moments in contemporary China. The Cultural Revolution of 1966-1976 illustrated how ideological fanaticism could produce chaotic impacts upon human behaviors in the Chinese attempt to create a new culture. The Tiananmen Movement of 1989 demonstrated Chinese students and citizens’ call for changing China’s social/political institution towards democracy. The open door and economic growth in the 1990’s and into the 21st century have dramatically improved the Chinese living standard that help formulate a new world view for the Chinese to stress the rising significance of China on the world stage. This course also requires students to compare contemporary China with their own societies and cultures in order to foster a comparative global perspective. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 285 The History of Ancient Greece

    3 Credit(s) DIII HP
    This course examines the history of Greece from the Mycenaean kingdoms to he Hellenistic age and all the triumphs and tragedies that lay between. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 286 The History of Rome

    3 Credit(s) DIII HP
    This course examines the history and culture of ancient Rome from the origins of the city to the disintegration of the western empire, tracing along the way the reasons for its meteoric rise and spectacular fall. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 287 Northern Europe to 1066

    3 Credit(s) DIII HP
    This course examines the history of the Celtic, Germanic, and other peoples of Northern Europe from the Bronze Age to the Norman Conquest of Anglo-Saxon England. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 290 People and Environment in Latin America

    3 Credit(s) HP PGR
    Environmental history looks at the relationships between humans and the natural environment over time. This course looks at people and environment in Latin America over the past 500 years, from indigenous societies through conquest and colonial rule, independence, export-led growth, import-substitution industrialization, and the new extractivism. We will look at mining, agriculture, and industry, at production and consumption, and at Latin America’s relationships with the United States and the rest of the world in terms of people, their work, and the environment. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 299 Samurai, Geisha, Emperor, and Concubine: Chinese and Japanese

    3 Credit(s) CEA WC
    This course provides an opportunity for students to be exposed to diverse worldviews of the best-known Chinese and Japanese historical movies and novels. Based upon historical knowledge, the course leads the students to experience critical studies of the most popular Chinese and Japanese historical movies and novels in order to appreciate their artistic creativity and cultural aestheticism. The students also compare East Asian historical movies and novels with those of their own cultures in order to find similarities and differences. Using fictional writing and movie making as mediums, the course guides the students to acquire necessary strategies and skills as well as applying them to writing short historical fictions or making short historical movie clips as their final assignments for the course. The student are given chances to present their works on or off campus. Three lecture hours per week.
 

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