Jul 19, 2024  
2020-2021 School of Graduate Studies Catalog 
    
2020-2021 School of Graduate Studies Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Graduate Courses


 
  
  • EDU 925E - Practicum in Teaching English (8-12)

    3 Credit(s) A full semester of field experience in a secondary school English Language Arts classroom working with a tenured practitioner. Appropriate supervision is supplied by the college in conjunction with weekly seminar experiences at the college. Designed exclusively for students seeking Initial Licensure in English.
    Pre-requisites: Program Coordinator approval.
    Co-requisite: EDU 925ES  
  
  • EDU 925ES - Practicum Seminar in Teaching English (8-12)

    3 Credit(s) A weekly seminar, to accompany the practicum experience, that provides support in the development of the Practicum portfolio and instruction in classroom management, teaching strategies, measurement, evaluation, and other issues as needed for student teachers working in secondary-level English Language Arts settings.
    Pre-requisite: Permission of Program Coordinator.
    Co-requisite: EDU 925E  
  
  • EDU 925H - Practicum in Teaching History

    3 Credit(s) A full semester practicum of at least 300 hours in a high school history classroom. Practicum students are supported by cooperating teachers and college supervisors as they develop their professional knowledge and skills working with adolescents. Restricted to candidates for secondary history licensure program who have completed all required courses.
    Co-requisite:  EDU 925HS  
  
  • EDU 925HS - Practicum Seminar in Teaching History

    3 Credit(s) This seminar, culminating the Secondary History Initial Licensure program, provides support for the practicum experience. Activities include a review of professional standards, completion of program assessments and preparation of a portfolio.
    Prerequisites:  Completion of coursework in middle school or secondary History program and approval of the Program Coordinator.
    Co-requisite: EDU 925H  or EDU 911MH 
  
  • EDU 925MA - Practicum/Internship Seminar in Teaching Mathematics

    1.5 Credit(s) This course is designed to help initial teacher candidates develop confidence in their skills and abilities to meet the challenges of being new mathematics teachers, and develop positive mental habits and professional attitudes. Weekly seminar supports an internship or practicum of at least 150 hours in a middle or secondary school math classroom. Seminar format will facilitate communication between practicum students/interns, their college supervisors and teaching professionals from their home schools.
    Pre-requisites: Completion of initial licensure program coursework, approval of Program Coordinator, and current position in the role of the license sought.
  
  • EDU 925MB - Practicum/Internship Seminar in Teaching Mathematics

    1.5 Credit(s) A continuation of EDU 925MA , this course is designed to help students develop into teaching professionals by exploring advanced classroom strategies, resources for practice, and opportunities for professional growth. Seminar supports an internship or practicum of at least 150 hours in a middle or secondary school mathematics classroom. Seminar format will facilitate communication between practicum students/interns, their college supervisors and teaching professionals from their home schools.
    Prerequisites: EDU 925MA , completion of initial licensure program coursework, approval of Program Coordinator, and current position in the role of the license sought.
  
  • EDU 925MP - Practicum in Teaching Mathematics (8-12)

    3 Credit(s) This course is a full semester of field experience in a secondary mathematics classroom(s) working with a professionally licensed cooperating teacher. Practicum students are supported by cooperating teachers and college supervisors as they develop their professional knowledge and skills working with adolescents. Designed exclusively for those seeking Initial Licensure in Mathematics.
    Prerequisite: Approval of program coordinator.
    Co-requisite:  .
  
  • EDU 925MS - Practicum Seminar in Teaching Mathematics (8-12)

    3 Credit(s) This course is a weekly seminar, to accompany the practicum experience, that provides support in the development of the practicum portfolio and instruction in classroom management, teaching strategies, measurement, evaluation and other issues as needed for student teachers working in secondary mathematics settings.
    Prerequisites: Program Coordinator approval. Co-requisite:  .
  
  • EDU 925SCA - Practicum/Internship Seminar in Teaching Science

    1.5 Credit(s) This course is designed to help initial teacher candidates develop confidence in their skills and abilities to meet the challenges of being new science teachers, and develop positive mental habits and professional attitudes. Seminar supports an internship or practicum of at least 150 hours in a middle or secondary school science classroom. Seminar format will facilitate communication between practicum students/interns, their college supervisors and teaching professionals from their home schools.
    Prerequisites: Completion of initial licensure program coursework, approval of Program Coordinator, and current position in the role of the license sought.
  
  • EDU 925SCB - Practicum/Internship Seminar in Teaching Science

    1.5 Credit(s) A continuation of EDU 925SCA , this course is addresses advanced classroom strategies and opportunities for professional growth. Seminar supports an internship or practicum of at least 150 hours in a middle or secondary school science classroom. Seminar format will facilitate communication among practicum students/interns, their college supervisors and teaching professionals. Candidates will develop portfolios documenting their teaching-learning experience.
    Prerequisite: EDU 925SCA .
  
  • EDU 925X - Practicum Secondary Education

    6 Credit(s) A full semester of field experience in a secondary school classroom working with a tenured practitioner. Appropriate supervision is supplied by the college in conjunction with weekly seminar experiences at the college. Designed exclusively for those students seeking initial licensure.
  
  • EDU 940NP - Seminar in Reading

    3 Credit(s) The seminar in reading must be included in the last nine hours of graduate study, and prior to taking the comprehensive examination in reading. It includes research in reading, current practices in teaching reading, administration, and evaluation of reading programs.
    Pre-requisites: EDU 840A , EDU 845 , and EDU 727 . (Restricted Admission)
  
  • EDU 949A - Clinical Experience in Elementary School Administration

    6 Credit(s) The clinical is required of students concentrating their M.Ed. studies in School Administration. The clinical must be in the role and at the level of the certificate sought. A clinical must be full time for one semester or half time for two semesters, include at least 400 clock hours at the practicum site. Each student will document the hours of observing, assisting, and carrying out the full responsibilities of the role. Students must complete 24 semester hours of course work including all of the pre-practicum courses and practicum, EDU949X before seeking approval of the program coordinator to enroll in the Clinical Experience.
  
  • EDU 949B - Clinical Experience in Middle School Administration

    6 Credit(s) The clinical is required of students concentrating their M.Ed. studies in School Administration. The clinical must be in the role and at the level of the certificate sought. A clinical must be full time for one semester or half time for two semesters, include at least 400 clock hours at the practicum site. Each student will document the hours of observing, assisting, and carrying out the full responsibilities of the role. Students must complete 24 semester hours of course work including all of the pre-practicum courses and practicum, EDU949X before seeking approval of the program coordinator to enroll in the Clinical Experience.
  
  • EDU 949C - Clinical Experience in High School Administration

    6 Credit(s) The clinical is required of students concentrating their M.Ed. studies in School Administration. The clinical must be in the role and at the level of the certificate sought. A clinical must be full time for one semester or half time for two semesters, include at least 400 clock hours at the practicum site. Each student will document the hours of observing, assisting, and carrying out the full responsibilities of the role. Students must complete 24 semester hours of course work including all of the pre-practicum courses and practicum, EDU949X before seeking approval of the program coordinator to enroll in the Clinical Experience.
  
  • EDU 949D - Educational Leadership Practicum

    3 Credit(s) The Educational Leadership Practicum is required of students concentrating their M.Ed. or C.A.G.S. Studies in Educational Leadership. The practicum must be in the role and at the level of the certificate sought. A practicum is at least 300 clock hours at the practicum site(s). Each student will document the hours of observing, assisting, and carrying out the full responsibilities of the role. Students must complete 24 semester hours of course work including all of the pre-practicum classes before seeking approval of the coordinator to enroll in the Educational Leadership Practicum.
    Co-requisite: EDU 949DS  
  
  • EDU 958 - Clinical Experience in Special Education

    6 Credit(s) In this course the college coordinator, the school system special educator and the initially licensed teacher will work cooperatively to prepare a satisfactory schedule of work to meet the full semester standard required for the Clinical Experience. The student will come to campus for four seminar meetings with the coordinator to receive direction, instruction, and support and to meet with peers to discuss experiences. Four additional meetings will be held at the site of the Practicum with the college supervisor, the school system special educator and the student to discuss the student’s program. 400 hours of supervised fieldwork are required.
    Pre-requisite: Approval of Program Coordinator.
  
  • EDU 961P - Practicum Experience in Elementary Education

    1.5 - 3.0 Credit(s) This is a semester-long supervised practicum experience in an elementary grade. In this course, teacher candidates provide high quality and coherent instruction, design and administer authentic and meaningful student assessments, analyze student performance and growth data, use this data to improve instruction, provide their students with constructive feedback on an on-going basis, and continuously refine learning objectives. Candidates support the learning and growth of all students .through instructional practices that establish high expectations, create a safe and effective classroom environment, and demonstrate cultural proficiency. Full-day, full-semester field placement is required.
    Pre-requisites: EDU 739 , EDU 898 , EDU 899 , EDU 762 .
    Co-requisite: EDU 961PS  
     

     

     

  
  • EDU 961PS - Practicum Seminar in Elementary Education

    1.5 - 3.0 Credit(s) This full semester seminar is taken in conjunction with the elementary practicum. The seminar provides pedagogical and content support to enhance the field experience. With a particular emphasis on effective strategies to collaborate with families as well as processes for collaborating effectively with colleagues, this seminar provides students seeking an initial license with a reflective complement to the full-time
    practicum Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisite: EDU 739  
    Co-requisite: EDU 961P  

     

  
  • EDU 961VA - Practicum in Elementary and Middle School Visual Arts Education

    3-6 Credit(s) This course is designed to help elementary and middle school visual arts initial licensure candidates build confidence in their skills and abilities to meet the challenges of being new visual arts teachers. Student teachers spend a minimum of 300 supervised hours observing, assisting and teaching with a licensed, mentor teacher of professional status in visual arts. This course will meet weekly as a group seminar.
    Pre-requisites: Satisfactory completion of all applicable MTEL tests and Program Coordinator approval.
  
  • EDU 961VA-PS - Practicum Seminar in Elementary and Middle School Visual Arts

    In this seminar participants will explore the theory and practice of art teaching as it relates to their experience in the elementary and /or middle school. Participants will reflect on their own progress and process, and discuss substantial issues as visual art teachers-in-training. Throughout this course students will document their professional learning and instructional materials and compile a teaching portfolio linked to the state licensure standards in Visual Art.
    Pre-requisite: Permission of the Coordinator and application to the student teaching practicum.
    Co-requisite: EDU 961VA  
  
  • EDU 962AR - Clinical Experience and Action Research in Early Childhood Education

    3 Credit(s) A 400 hour supervised field experience in an early childhood setting in which students will conduct two action research projects.
    Pre-requisite: Written permission of the Program Coordinator.
  
  • EDU 962VA - Practicum in Secondary Visual Arts Education

    3-6 Credit(s) This course is designed to help secondary visual arts initial licensure candidates build confidence in their skills and abilities to meet the challenges of being new visual arts teachers. Student teachers spend a minimum of 300 supervised hours observing, assisting and teaching with a licensed, mentor teacher of professional status in visual arts. This course will meet weekly as a group seminar.
    Pre-requisites: Satisfactory completion of all applicable MTEL tests and Program Coordinator approval
  
  • EDU 962VA-PS - Practicum Seminar in Middle and High School Visual Arts

    3 Credit(s) In this seminar participants will explore the theory and practice of art teaching as it relates to their experience in the middle and/high school. Participants will reflect on their own progress and process, and discuss substantial issues as visual art teachers-in-training. Throughout this course students will document their professional learning and instructional materials and compile a teaching portfolio linked to the state licensure standards in Visual Art.

    Prerequisite: Permission of the Coordinator and application to the student teaching practicum.
    Co-requisite: EDU 962VA
     

  
  • EDU 963R - Education Capstone: Action Research I

    3 Credit(s) This course is part one of the two-part capstone experience in the advanced M.Ed. programs. Teacher action research allows teachers to examine practice, develop new approaches and interventions, and to examine the results of these newly implemented ideas. In this course, students will explore the field of teacher research, gain a solid understanding of the relationship between teacher research and instructional improvement, and develop a proposal for a teacher research project.
  
  • EDU 965 - Clinical Experience Secondary

    6 Credit(s) A full semester (400 hours) of classroom teaching experiences with accompanying weekly seminar on topics related to effective secondary teaching. Seminar topics include school restructuring and current developments in curriculum and instruction, interdisciplinary planning and teaching, community resources, and models of inclusion.
    Pre-requisites: Provisional Certification and completion of professional course sequence.
  
  • EDU 966 - Internship in Instructional Technology

    3 Credit(s) A 15-week field experience with accompanying seminars. Time will be divided equally among each of three school settings. Students will observe and assist in each of these roles: (1) computer teacher, (2) instructional technology facilitator, and (3) technology coordinator.
    Pre-requisite: Completion of all course requirements in the M.Ed.: Professional Studies-Technology in Education program.
  
  • EDU 968A - School Counseling Practicum I

    3 Credit(s) The school counseling practicum is designed to provide students with a broad range of school counseling activities designed to meet School Guidance Counselor requirements for licensure in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In School Counseling Practicum I, students are required to serve 250 hours under the supervision of an appropriately licensed cooperating practitioner in a public school setting that is pre-approved by the program coordinator. Restricted Admission. Permission of the School Counseling Program Coordinator required.
    Co-requisite: EDU 969A  
  
  • EDU 968B - School Counseling Practicum II

    3 Credit(s) The school counseling practicum is designed to provide students with a broad range of school counseling activities designed to meet School Guidance Counselor requirements for licensure in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. In School Counseling Practicum II, students are required to serve 250 hours under the supervision of an appropriately licensed cooperating practitioner in a public school setting that is pre-approved by the program coordinator. Restricted Admission. Permission of the School Counseling Program Coordinator required.
    Co-requisite: EDU 969B  
  
  • EDU 969A - Practicum Seminar in School Counseling I

    3 Credit(s) In this semester participants will explore the theory and practice of school counseling as it relates to their experience in the field. Participants will reflect on their own progress and process and discuss outstanding issues as professional school counselors-in-training. Throughout this course students will integrate their formal preparation in school counseling into a multidimensional program of integral services.These include leadership, advocacy, counseling, consultation, collaboration, and assessment. Restricted admission. Permission of the School Counseling Program Coordinator required.
    Co-requisite: EDU 968A  
  
  • EDU 969B - Practicum Seminar in School Counseling II

    3 Credit(s) In this seminar participants will explore the theory and practice of school counseling as it relates to their experience in the field. Participants will reflect on their own progress and process and discuss outstanding issues as professional school counselors-in-training, Throughout this course students will integrate their formal preparation in school counseling into a multidimensional program of integral services. These include leadership, advocacy, counseling, consultation, collaboration, and assessment. Restricted admission. Permission of the School Counseling Program Coordinator required.
    Co-requisite: EDU 968B  
  
  • EDU 985A - Practicum in Student Affairs I

    3 Credit(s) Provides students with an opportunity to integrate theory and practice and become familiar with the role of professionals in higher education. Students complete 135 hours in a supervised internship within an approved higher education or student affairs department. In addition, students participate in a practicum seminar that meets 15 hours a semester to facilitate reflection on the field experience.
    Pre-requisites: EDU 719 , EDU 723  and EDU 773 .
  
  • EDU 985B - Practicum in Student Affairs II

    3 Credit(s) The purpose of the practicum is to place the student in a setting where he/she can become familiar with the role, mission, operation and activities associated with an area within Student Affairs. Includes four four-hour seminars and a 135 hour supervised practice field experience.
    Prerequisite: EDU 985A .
  
  • EDU 990E - Teaching Students with Exceptional Learning Needs

    3 Credit(s) All teachers teach all students; therefore all teachers must prepare to work with students with exceptional learning needs (ELN) This course will develop candidates’ understanding of the collaborative roles of professionals who work with families to support students with ELN. The focus of the class will be on how to develop an inclusive, welcoming classroom environment where all learners thrive through the use of differentiated instruction, universal design for learning, and the appropriate application of assistive and adaptive technologies. Topics include: IEPs, 504 plans, Response-to-Intervention, and gifted education emphasizing teaching methodologies and tools appropriate to inclusive, welcoming environments: universal design for learning, differentiation, and the use of adaptive and assistive technologies. Three lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments required.
  
  • EDU 990M - Enhancing Teacher Responses to Students’ Needs

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to provide educators with a structured approach to assess students’ needs and respond to their questions and disclosures. Strategies for referring appropriately for students’ needs will be examined. Sources of legal, community and support services will be explored. Special focus on communicating with parents will be included.
  
  • EDU 990PH - Practicum in Middle School Humanities

    3 Credit(s) A full semester of at least 300 hours in humanities middle school classroom(s). Practicum students are supported by cooperating teachers and college supervisors as they develop their professional knowledge and skills working with early adolescents. Restricted to candidates for the middle school humanities licensure program who have completed all required courses.
    Co-requisite: EDU 990SH  
  
  • EDU 990PM - Practicum in Middle School Math/Science

    3 Credit(s) A full semester of at least 300 hours in mathematics/science middle school classroom(s). Practicum students are supported by cooperating teachers and college supervisors as they develop their professional knowledge and skills working with early adolescents. Restricted to candidates in the middle school math/science licensure program who have completed all required courses.
    Co-requisite: EDU 990SM .
  
  • EDU 990SH - Practicum Seminar in Middle School Humanities

    3 Credit(s) This seminar, culminating the Middle School Humanities Initial Licensure program, provides support for the practicum experience. Activities include a review of professional standards, completion of program assessments and preparation of a portfolio.
    Prerequisites: Completion of coursework in the middle school humanities licensure program and approval of the Program Coordinator.
    Co-requisite: EDU 990PH .
  
  • EDU 990SM - Practicum Seminar in Middle School Math/Science

    3 Credit(s) This seminar, culminating the Middle School Math/Science Initial Licensure program, provides support for the practicum experience. Activities include a review of professional standards, completion of program assessments and preparation of a portfolio.
    Prerequisites: Completion of coursework in the middle school math/science licensure program and approval of the Program Coordinator.
    Co-requisite: EDU 990PM .
  
  • EDU 991K - Leadership for Excellence in Education

    3 Credit(s) This course emphasizes the role of shared leadership in centers and schools. It considers the role of formal leaders such as principals and directors, as well as the contribution of informal leaders including teachers, union officials and community members. Through the review of theory and research on leadership, the study of organizational culture and the principles necessary to support change, the course will help participants to understand how they may influence the direction and quality of the institutions where they work. Attention will be paid to the development of skills and habits which support effective leaders.
  
  • EDU 992A - Managing Dysfunctional Students in the Classroom

    3 Credit(s) Designed for regular classroom educators as well as special education personnel, this institute will review and investigate ecologies and techniques which will enable dysfunctional students to perform successfully and adapt productively in various educational settings. Participants will develop strategies for dealing with such students and their families within and beyond established educational settings.
  
  • EDU 992D - Differentiating Instruction for English Language Learners

    3 Credit(s) This course provides examination of the issues and approaches used in the education of diverse PK-12 English language learners (ELLs) with a variety of special needs. Students will learn the methods and approaches used to assess, evaluate, and determine eligibility for placement of ELLs in special education programs. Students will design curriculum that differentiates instruction for ELLs with special needs and discuss ways of communicating with their parents and advocating on their behalf.
    Pre-requisites:   or   and   or   
     
  
  • EDU 999AN - Creating-Brain Compatible Learning

    3 Credit(s) The course presents new research related to the brain and its applications to teaching and learning strategies. It examines learning styles and theories of multiple intelligences. Participants will design learning environments that best suit the diverse instructional needs of students with a better understanding of how they learn.
  
  • EDU 999C - Teaching Students to Write (Pre K-12)

    3 Credit(s) This course presents research-based and classroom-tested ways to teach writing effectively for diverse learner profiles. Topics include writing development, elements of composition for digital and print texts, awareness of task, audience, and purpose for various writing types, models of instruction, organizing writing workshops and writing conferences, writing process, assessment, writing in the content areas, the reading/writing connection, coaching other teachers around writing, and an emphasis on teacher as writer.

     

  
  • EDU 999CS - Consulting Services in Special Education

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed with a focus on the home, school and community influences. Issues and interactions are analyzed as especially related to family adjustment in the presence of a handicapped child. Family reactions and behavioral differences are also considered vis-a-vis services to children with various degrees of disability. Emphasis is given to guidance skills and knowledge needed by teachers and other professional workers in the field of Special Education.
  
  • EDU 999EM - Teaching Elementary & Middle School Math & Science

    3 Credit(s) Addresses curriculum in mathematics and science at elementary and middle levels based on national and state guidelines for standards of performance. Approach to instruction is constructivist, inquiry-based and cross-disciplinary, incorporating new technologies to enhance teaching and learning.
  
  • EDU 999ST - Introduction to Storytelling (Prek-8)

    3 Credit(s) This course will introduce students to the history of storytelling, the current revival of storytelling, and the art of becoming a storyteller. Emphasis will be placed on the acquisition of storytelling techniques to use with children in classrooms (PreK-8), nursery schools, day care centers, and libraries. A workshop format designed to help beginners gain confidence prior to sharing their stories with youngsters in group settings will be utilized.
  
  • EDU 999TT - Advanced Teaching Strategies in the Early Childhood and Elementary Curriculum

    3 Credit(s) This curriculum course will focus on practicing early childhood and elementary teachers developing their practice of teaching. Various advanced teaching strategies will be examined and practiced, as well as current national mandates on teaching. Participants will have hands-on experience in the exploration of various strategies. 
  
  • EEC 807 - Leadership and Supervision in Early Education and Care

    3 Credit(s) This course provides an overview of effective leadership and supervision in early education and care settings. Current and aspiring early education and care administrators will learn how to foster the professional development of new and veteran teachers; to form enduring and productive partnerships with families; and to recruit and orient substitutes and volunteers. Special emphasis will be placed on how to create a learning culture among the teaching staff. Includes a 15-hour field experience.
  
  • EEC 808 - Supporting Dual Language Learners and Their Families in Early Childhood

    3 Credit(s) Early educators will learn how to support dual language learners in early childhood settings. Through multiple activities, students will learn to effectively communicate with linguistically and culturally diverse families, support dual language development, assess children’s learning needs, and design developmentally appropriate instruction that promotes dual language and literacy development. Strategies for communicating and collaborating with limited or non-English speaking families and for supporting children’s home languages will also be addressed. Includes 15 hours of field-based assignments.
  
  • EEC 809 - Anti-bias Education: Perspectives, and Advocacy in Early Childhood Education

    3 Credit(s) This course explores historical and current trends and issues in early childhood education, multi-lingual education, early childhood special education, and culturally-responsive education with an emphasis on anti-bias education, an approach to early childhood education that focuses on respecting and embracing differences and acting against bias and unfairness. Students will also explore the historical role of social advocacy with a focus on how to develop their own advocacy skills. The importance of collaboration and consultation with other professionals and staff in early childhood education will also be explored. The course has been modified to provide an emphasis on anti-bias education-an essential approach in ECE that is not currently addressed in any of the courses in the major. Currently anti-bias education is included in some courses by some instructors. The change ensures that this important approach is addressed in the M.Ed. Advanced. 

     

     

     

  
  • EEC 810 - Early Intervention and Care

    3 Credit(s) Students learn how to work effectively with young children (birth to three) who are experiencing or are at-risk for developmental delays. Students will explore the history of and rationale for providing early intervention services and the impact that disability conditions have on children’s learning in all developmental domains. Appropriate instructional techniques and family engagement models will also be explored along with effective ways to collaborate with family, therapists, and other professions. Includes 15-hour field experience.
  
  • EEC 811 - Risk Factors that Affect Children and Families

    3 Credit(s) This course examines risk factors that affect development during childhood (Birth to 8) as well as effective interventions that can support children and families in the early years. Specifically, the impact of risk factors including socioeconomic status (SES), access (to qualify early education or health care), parental characteristics (e.g., education, stress, parenting style), and child characteristics (e.g., behavior, resiliency) on child development, as well as the interaction between and among these factors will be explored. This course will also address effective intervention strategies for fostering positive development among children considered at-risk. Includes a 15 hour field experience. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • EME 990PM - Practicum in Middle School Mathematics

    3 Credit(s) A full semester of at least 300 hours in a middle school mathematics classroom(s). Practicum students are supported by cooperating teachers and college supervisors as they develop their professional knowledge and skills working with early adolescents. Restricted to candidates in the MAT Middle School Mathematics Initial Licensure track who have completed all required courses.
    Co-requisite: EME 990SM  
  
  • EME 990SM - Practicum Seminar in Middle School Mathematics

    3 Credit(s) A weekly seminar to accompany the practicum experience that provides instruction in classroom management, teaching strategies, measurement, evaluation and other issues for student teachers working in a middle school mathematics classroom.
    Pre-requisites: Satisfactory completion of all licensure program requirements and Program Coordinator approval.
    Co-requisite: EME 990PM  
  
  • ENG 700 - Early American Literature

    3 Credit(s) A study of American literature in its social and political context, from its beginnings in New England and Virginia to about 1800. Particular emphasis upon the origins and development of fiction and the first American novels.
  
  • ENG 701 - American Romantic Movement

    3 Credit(s) A study of the literature of America from the early nineteenth century to the Civil War, with emphasis on the various manifestations of romanticism in the writings of the period.
  
  • ENG 704 - Contemporary American Fiction

    3 Credit(s) Contemporary American Fiction introduces students to the graduate-level study of significant works of fiction by still-active and recently active writers in the United States.
  
  • ENG 707 - Nineteenth Century American Novel

    3 Credit(s) A study of the development of the early American novel. Some of the writers to be considered are Brown, Cooper, Hawthorne, Stowe, Alcott, Jewett, and Melville.
  
  • ENG 708 - Native American Literature

    3 Credit(s) This course introduces students to Native American literature and to the historical, literary, and cultural influences shaping Native American literary production. Special attention may be given to such recurrent themes and artistic concerns in Native American literature as genocide, sovereignty, relocation, tribal identity, mythology, and orality.
  
  • ENG 709 - Literature of the American Dream

    3 Credit(s) Study of the crosscurrents of materialism and idealism in American literature, emphasizing attitudes toward the land, work, progress, and success. Works to be considered will be selected from the writings of American authors from the seventeenth through the twentieth century.
  
  • ENG 713 - Digital Humanities

    3 Credit(s) This course introduces students to the theories and practices of using digital tools and methodologies for humanities research. The course will cover a range of topics within the digital humanities, such as the role of technology in digital humanities, ongoing intellectual debates in the field, and applications of critical theory to new media technologies. Students will also gain hands-on experience working on digital scholarship.
  
  • ENG 714 - Modern American Jewish Novel

    3 Credit(s) Is Jewishness the key to the gentile heart, as one critic claims, or is there an “ancient and eternal rift between the Jewish ideal and the world at large”? We will address these and other questions about the literary intersection of Jewish and American culture in this chronological survey of American Jewish fiction.
  
  • ENG 715 - Topics in Digital Humanities

    3 Credit(s) This course offers an intensive examination of highly specialized topical areas in digital studies. May be repeated, with a different topic, for up to 6 credits with permission of the English MA graduate coordinator.
  
  • ENG 717 - African American Fiction

    3 Credit(s) The course will examine the work of African American novelists and short story writers from William Well Brown to the present, including such major figures as Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, and Toni Morrison. The course will place the writing in its historical setting and emphasize the development of the African American tradition in fiction.
  
  • ENG 719 - Contemporary American Autobiography

    3 Credit(s) This course examines American autobiography since 1945, with an emphasis on unusual presentations of selfhood. Among the authors studied are Richard Wright, Kim Chernin, Maxine Hong Kingston and Art Spiegelman. We will also survey recent autobiography criticism which questions the limits and possibilities of the genre.
  
  • ENG 722 - Methods of Teaching ESOL in Varied Contexts (Non-Licensure)

    3 Credit(s) This course provides an introduction to teaching English to speakers of other languages in varied contexts in the United States and abroad. Current methods and approaches will be explored and practiced. Topics include working with diverse populations, teaching language in context, developing lessons and curriculum for specific age groups and situations, aspects of literacy, and issues surrounding culture and identity. Field experience hours are required. This course is not required for those seeking licensure in K-12 schools.
  
  • ENG 725 - Introduction to Graduate Studies in Literature

    3 Credit(s) This course introduces students to thinking and writing about literature in the context of the discipline’s academic discourse. The course focuses on familiarizing students with debates and problems relevant to the field, researching secondary literature, and writing for a scholarly audience. Required of all MA, MAT, and MA/MAT students in their first semester in the program. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • ENG 726 - Studies in Theory

    3 Credit(s) This course offers an opportunity for students to study a specific area of theory. Possibilities might include the study of theoretical issues such as aesthetics, theoretical movements such as critical race studies, or theorists such as Michel Foucault. This course may be repeated for a max of nine credits where the topics are different. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • ENG 728 - TESOL Methods in PK-12 Schools

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to prepare English as a Second Language (ESL) licensure candidates to plan, implement, and manage standards-based ESL and Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) content instruction in PreK-12 schools. Students will apply their knowledge of evidence-based ESL practices and strategies to classrooms that serve English language learners (ELL’S) from diverse backgrounds across grade levels and program models. Emphasis will be placed on developing and integrating language skills within the context of thematic units aligned to the Massachusetts curriculum frameworks. Students will also learn to evaluate, adapt, and develop materials and assessments for English language learners. (ELLs) in PreK-12 contexts. Three lecture hours a week plus a pre-practicum field experience in a PreK-12 school.
    Pre-requisites:  ENG 770N  or EDS 770N  and ENG 792  or EDS 792  
  
  • ENG 735 - Seventeenth Century British Poetry

    3 Credit(s) A study of Ben Jonson and the neoclassical tradition, John Donne and the metaphysical tradition, the Spenserian writers and others. A close reading of selected poems, with an emphasis on the intellectual and philosophical movements of the era.
  
  • ENG 736N - Modern British Literature I

    3 Credit(s) A multi-genre approach to the literature of the British Isles in the first half of the twentieth century: fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction.
  
  • ENG 738 - Modern British Drama

    3 Credit(s) This course addresses the variety of British Drama from O’Casey and Shaw to Ayckbourn and Churchill. With emphasis especially on developments since the 1950s, readings will explore the social and political influences and the theatrical experiments that shape contemporary British Theater.
  
  • ENG 744 - English Language Arts Curriculum, Materials, and Methods (8-12)

    3 Credit(s) This course investigates the background and philosophies of teaching English Language Arts 8-12, focusing on methods and materials in the classroom. Topics include; curriculum development, unit and lesson planning, teaching resources, classroom practice and management, testing and assessment, the integration of the arts and humanities, and the role of technology in teaching English. A review of national and state standards, the Massachusetts Frameworks, and social, political and cultural issues of concern to the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) will be conducted. Includes a 25-hour pre-practicum field experience at an area middle or secondary school.
    Pre-requisites: EDG 705 , EDU 709 , EDU 814 , and permission of program coordinator.
  
  • ENG 745 - Introduction to Writing and Rhetoric

    3 Credit(s) This course introduces students to the discipline of writing and rhetoric, its formation, histories, theories, and methodologies. Students will study key concepts, theories, and practices as well as trace and explore historical and ongoing conversations in the discipline. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • ENG 748 - Literature For Young Adults

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to acquaint teachers and librarians with the latest in literature for the junior and senior high schooler. It explores the literary tastes of today’s young adults and suggests relevant material for inclusion in the literature program. Emphasis is placed on teaching techniques which will encourage young people of varying abilities to read widely and voluntarily.
  
  • ENG 751 - Masterpieces of Nineteenth Century English Literature

    3 Credit(s) Readings in the famous novels of the age: Austen, Brontes, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, Wilde, and others. Other genres also will be considered.
  
  • ENG 754 - Origins of the Novel: Eighteenth Century British Fiction

    3 Credit(s) This course focuses on selected eighteenth century works of fiction and their place in the historical development of the novel. We will consider them as important literary texts in their own rights that emerged from and contributed to literary, cultural and political currents. In addition, we will consider the way these works influenced later fiction.
  
  • ENG 755 - English Romanticism

    3 Credit(s) A study of the major English romantic poets. A close reading of important poems, with an emphasis on the intellectual and philosophical movements of the era.
  
  • ENG 757 - The Arthurian Legend

    3 Credit(s) A study of the Arthurian literary tradition, from the Middle Ages to the present including such works as Geoffrey of Monmouth’s Historia Regum Britanniae, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Malory’s Le Morte D’Arthur, Tennyson’s Idylls of the King, Twain’s A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court, and T.H. White’s The Once and Future King.
  
  • ENG 758 - Studies in Shakespeare

    3 Credit(s) A study of selected topics in the works of Shakespeare. More specific information on particular points of focus is provided in the brochure for the semester in which the course is offered.
  
  • ENG 761 - Shakespeare Teacher’s Institute with Actors’ Shakespeare Project

    3 Credit(s) The weeklong institute is for teachers and teachers-in-training and brings Shakespeare’s plays to life through performance techniques and scholarly research. The institute focuses on a single play and is co-led with faculty from Salem State and staff/actors from Actors’ Shakespeare Project. Students will do some acting, learn about curriculum development, and generate both teaching lesson plans/assessments and a short scholarly project. Online discussions after the institute and a reconvene meeting are also required. May be repeated for credit or taken only for professional development points. As establishing pre-institute communication is necessary, enrollment is by permission of coordinator.
  
  • ENG 764 - Twentieth-Century Japanese Fiction

    3 Credit(s) An introduction to modern Japan through its literature. Students will read a variety of twentieth century Japanese novels and short stories to discover Japanese literary forms, themes and techniques.
  
  • ENG 770N - Context and Culture in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

    3 Credit(s) This course provides a foundation for understanding the field of teaching English to speakers of other languages. Local, national, and international contexts are examined and used in investigating various historical and current approaches to teaching English learners. Topics include law and language policies, cultural identity, language diversity, and culturally responsive teaching to forge family and or community relations. Three lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required.

     

  
  • ENG 771 - Sociolinguistics

    3 Credit(s) This course investigates the relationship between language and human society. Students will evaluate current and classic sociolinguistic theory and research and will gather language data for an original research paper. Students will become familiar with a variety of topics applicable to this field including language variety; language and ethnicity; language, language choice; language and gender; and aspects of language and culture. The challenges inherent to societal issues related to language, literacy, and education will be covered in depth.
  
  • ENG 776 - Linguistics for Language Teachers

    3 Credit(s) This course will provide in-depth analysis of the components of language: syntax, phonetics, phonology, morphology, and semantics. Students will apply concepts to language teaching and learning. Field-based hours are required. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • ENG 778N - Assessment of English Learners

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the assessment of English Learners (ELs) for a variety of purposes including documenting the effects of instruction on student learning and using assessment to inform instruction. Students will design performance assessments and indicators for second language learners in English as a Second Language (ESL) and Sheltered English Immersion (SEI) classrooms. Students will also become familiar with placement and content-area tests that meet state requirements and will design original assessments focused on content and language development designed to measure academic achievement for linguistically diverse students. Three lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisites: EDS 770N  /ENG 770N  
  
  • ENG 780 - Psycholinguistics

    3 Credit(s) This course will consider topics such as the nature of language, language and the brain, first and second language acquisition and bilingualism.
    Prerequisite: ENG 776 .
  
  • ENG 782 - Origin and Development of the English Language

    3 Credit(s) This course will trace the origin of the English language, its linguistic and historical development, and the social and literary forces which shaped it until the present time.
  
  • ENG 787 - The Literature of Genocide

    3 Credit(s) This course examines a range of literary responses to genocide through such media as fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry, eye-witness testimony, human rights documents, and documentary and feature films. Readings are drawn from various world regions, and concentrate primarily on post-1945 texts which investigate common concerns of Genocide Studies such as ethics, gendericide, trauma, justice and retribution. The course may culminate in a research project in a chosen area. Three lecture hours.
    Prerequisite:  ENG 725  
  
  • ENG 790 - The Bible as Literature

    3 Credit(s) This course will offer in depth literary analysis of selected readings from the English Bible in translation. Readings will represent a range of literary genres.
  
  • ENG 792 - Introduction to TESOL Methods

    3 Credit(s) This course focuses on applying theories, principles, and evidence-based methods of second language acquisition to the development of materials, lessons, and curricula for teaching English to speakers of other languages. Students will cultivate skills in the design and delivery of contextualized lesson plans, develop expertise in the selection and evaluation of materials such as textbooks, computer-assisted materials, and realia, and demonstrate their understanding of critical issues in TESOL. Field-based assignments are required. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • ENG 794 - Studies in Literature of the World

    3 Credit(s) This course offers an opportunity for students to study texts drawn from World literatures. Possibilities might include study of a significant author or work in a global context, or examination of various genres or traditions in World Literature. This course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. Multiple enrollments in a term are allowed.
  
  • ENG 796 - Feminist Literary Criticism

    3 Credit(s) A study of the origins of feminist literary criticism and its relationship to other contemporary critical approaches. The course will examine mainly American and French critics and will include practice of the methodology to critique selected texts.
  
  • ENG 797 - Feminist Rhetorical Theory and Criticism

    3 Credit(s) This course will introduce students to theories and research methodologies that inform feminist scholarship in rhetoric. Students will have the opportunity to read work my major feminist scholars, develop their own commitments as writers and scholars, and research subject of interest. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • ENG 799 - English Study and Travel Seminar

    3 Credit(s) A study and travel course that incorporates a research trip to a location appropriate to the course. Topic varies. May be repeated up to two times for up to a total of six credits. Students will be responsible for travel costs. Three lecture hours.
  
  • ENG 808 - Public Relations Institute

    3 Credit(s) An intensive institute on the practical aspects of successful writing and design of publications. The workshops will involve desktop publishing. Designed for the educator, the professional, or the beginner.
  
  • ENG 812 - Poetry and Poetics

    3 Credit(s) This course explores important aspects of poetry analysis, including such topics as figurative language, symbol, sound, rhythm, and form. Readings include classic poems from the past, contemporary works, and critical commentary.
  
  • ENG 816 - Writing for Travel and Tourism

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to help students learn how to write articles suitable for publication in newspapers and magazines dealing with travel and tourism and to acquaint students with some classic works in the literature of travel.
  
  • ENG 817 - Contemporary Approaches to the Teaching of Composition

    3 Credit(s) This course will investigate the research and theories which inform current composition pedagogy. Students will practice adapting various theoretical perspectives to actual classroom situations.
 

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