May 19, 2024  
2020-2021 School of Graduate Studies Catalog 
    
2020-2021 School of Graduate Studies Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Graduate Courses


 
  
  • CRJ 711 - Police Policy and Practice

    3 Credit(s) Initially, this course will review the historical developments of police policy and police practice. It will examine the changes associated with policy and practice over the past several decades and will focus on how well those practices have serviced specific communities across the U.S. This evaluation will include ideological paradigm shifts between stated mandates versus actual experiences of various communities and specific groups.
  
  • CRJ 712 - Criminal Profiling of Violent Offenders

    3 Credit(s) This course will review the history of criminal profiling as well as the current strategies utilized in criminal profiling. Research on reliability, validity and ethical issues of profiling will be reviewed. There also will be an emphasis on application of currently utilized models in developing profiles through analysis of case studies. The course will extensively cover the three main areas of profiling: forensic analysis, victimology, and crime scene characteristics. Admininistration Concentration Elective.
  
  • CRJ 713 - Drugs and Crime

    3 Credit(s) This course reviews issues in alcohol misuse, licit and illicit drug use, and the criminal justice system. Topics range from contemporary drug issues, to the history of drug use as well as policy approaches. Students will assess the role of drugs in American society, the psychological and physiological effects of abuse, past and current drug control policies, and effective drug treatments. Administration and Criminology Concentration Elective.
  
  • CRJ 714 - Topics in Criminal Justice

    3 Credit(s) This course is an examination of specialized topics in Criminal Justice. The emphasis is on current issues and research and will include advanced readings and research. Topics may include: terrorism, comparative policing, gangs, sex offenders, globalization and crime, technology and crime, security administrations, homeland security and crime mapping. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 courses. Multiple enrollments in a given semester permitted. Three lecture hours per week. Elective
  
  • CRJ 715 - Mental Illness and the Criminal Justice System

    3 Credit(s) This course explores the relationship of mental illness to crime and violence as well as the policies and programs concerning the treatment of individuals with mental illness in the criminal justice system. The course focuses on the nature, prevalence and consequences of mental illness among criminal offenders, the assessment of violence risk, the evolving concept of legal competence, the institutional and community-based treatments of mentally ill offenders. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • CRJ 716 - Hate Crimes

    3 Credit(s) This course will examine the causes and consequences of hate crimes, as well as the social contexts within which they occur. We will explore why some individuals become motivated to commit violent acts based on their prejudices and intergroup rivalries. We will also analyze how various actors and conditions in the social environment influence the incidence of hate crimes, including hate groups, the media and political leaders. Three lecture hours per week.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  
  • CRJ 718 - Gangs in America

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the history of gangs in the United States, myths and realities of gangs, the nature and extent of gangs, statistics and demographics on gangs, gang structures and process, national gang trends, gangs and social media, gang theories, and criminal activities of gangs, including the link between urban gangs and violence. Special attention is given to best practices in combatting gang problems, including gang prevention, intervention and suppression. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • CRJ 800A - Theories of Crime

    3 Credit(s) This course provides students with an understanding of the major theories of crime causation developed over the last three centuries. Special attention is devoted to issues related to the measurement of crime and what can be discerned from the available empirical data about the nature and extent of crime. In addition, explanations of various crime types such as violent and white-collar crime are highlighted and discussed.
  
  • CRJ 801 - Criminal Justice Process & Administration

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the processes involved in the administration of the criminal justice system, specifically policy, court and correctional agencies. Special attention will be focused on the external and internal factors that currently impact criminal justice administration and policy formulation.
  
  • CRJ 802 - Criminal Law & the Judicial System

    3 Credit(s) This course will include a discussion of criminal law, its historical development, function and purpose in American society. The essential elements of crime and principles of criminal liability will be studied. Various laws pertaining to offenses against persons, property, public order and the government will be reviewed. The course will also include discussion of the judicial system and its procedures. Judicial processing of criminal violators, and their due process rights, will be examined. Current legal and judicial issues will be selected and analyzed.
  
  • CRJ 810 - Advanced Research Methods in Criminal Justice

    3 Credit(s) This course will examine the logic and validity of research procedures in experimental, quasi-experimental, survey and field research. Students will develop critical abilities in analyzing social science research and will formulate research proposals using the techniques studied.
  
  • CRJ 812 - Criminal Justice Statistical Analysis

    3 Credit(s) This course introduces statistical concepts used for analyzing crime and evaluating crime policies. Students will survey statistical methods for establishing correlations, interpreting trends, conducting time series analysis, and prediction. The underlying concepts integral to these techniques are reviewed including probability and sampling distributions, hypothesis testing, effect size, and statistical power. An undergraduate course in statistics is required.
  
  • CRJ 813A - Directed Study: Criminal Justice Thesis Preparation I

    3 Credit(s) This is the first part of a two course sequence. It is a contribution of scholarship in one’s field of study, and may take a variety of approaches; an empirical study, a legal research project, a policy proposal, a needs assessment, or a theoretical analysis of specific issues related to crime and criminal justice. Students will work with a thesis committee.
    Prerequisites:  B+ in   and  . Permission of Graduate Coordinator
  
  • CRJ 813B - Directed Study: Criminal Justice Thesis Preparation II

    3 Credit(s) This course is the second part in the thesis preparation. Students will analyze their data and observations and write their thesis. This includes the student’s oral defense and satisfactory completion of necessary revisions.
    Prerequisites: CRJ 813A , Permission of Graduate Coordinator
  
  • CRJ 850 - Graduate Capstone

    3 Credit(s) This course offers students the opportunity to integrate knowledge gained in the classroom with real-world problems. This is a summative course for the Master’s Degree that builds upon the understanding and concepts of Criminal Justice and Criminology learned throughout the program. Students may be required to complete a major paper and presentation in this course. Community —based and agency —based participatory projects are encouraged. To the extent possible, the paper completed for this course has as a goal an active contribution to the field of Criminal Justice and/ or Criminology.
    Pre-requisites: completion of all other required courses and 27 credits total. 3 credit hours.
  
  • CRJ 875 - Directed Study

    1-6 Credits Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a faculty member of the department of Criminal Justice.
  
  • CRJ 876 - Directed Study

    1-6 Credits Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a faculty member of the department of Criminal Justice.
  
  • CSC 701 - Software Engineering

    3 Credit(s) This course is devoted to the theory and practice of software engineering. It will explore state-of-practice and cutting-edge techniques and tools related to the specification, design, management, implementation, maintenance and evolution of software systems. Topics include: design patterns; Model Driven Architecture (MDA); test-driven development; agile development; design and implementation for reusability and maintainability; secure coding; evolution of support tools and environments. An ongoing group project will be used to gain practical experience with current software engineering practices and a variety of IDEs and CASE tools. Extensive reading and reporting on advanced topics in software engineering discipline are required. Three lecture hours per week.

    Pre-requisite:  Matriculated in a computer science graduate program or permission of graduate program coordinator.

  
  • CSC 710 - Theory of Computation

    3 Credit(s) This course is dedicated to the analysis of important theoretical issues concerning programs, computers, problems, and computation. The course introduces the basic concepts underlying the theoretical study of computing and computers: formal languages, automata, Turing machines, computability, and computational complexity. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisite: Matriculated in a computer science program or permission of graduate program coordinator.
  
  • CSC 715 - Analysis of Algorithms

    3 Credit(s) This course presents a variety of general algorithms in the computing filed, examines the design and implementation techniques of useful and efficient algorithms, and analyzes algorithmic complexity. Topics include mathematical tools for algorithm analysis, numeric algorithms, tree structures, hashing techniques and recursion, analysis of searching and sorting algorithms, dynamic programming, graph representation and traversal algorithms, pattern matching, computation complexity, and computational geometry. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisite: Matriculated in a computer science graduate program or permission of graduate coordinator.
  
  • CSC 725 - Computer Graphics and Games

    3 Credit(s) This course covers principles and applications underlying computer graphics and computer games and presents key aspects of computer graphics including graphics pipeline, scene graphs, 2D/3D geometric objects and transformations, viewing, shading, and modeling. Topics related to computer game development include game engines, animation, and behavior and interaction. The course will also introduce techniques of collision detection, illumination, game design and implementation, and the application of graphics libraries and game engines and toolkits. Three lecture hours per week.

    Prerequisites: matriculated in a computer science graduate program or permission of graduate program coordinator.

  
  • CSC 740 - Artificial Intelligence

    3 Credit(s) This course discusses fundamental concepts of artificial intelligence. The course presents the core concepts of intelligent systems like problem solving, reasoning, decision-making, and learning. The course explores variety of artificial intelligence techniques, and their application and limitations. Major topics include: problem solving, heuristic search, knowledge representation, planning, expert systems, learning, neural networks, language processing. Three lecture hours per week.

    Prerequisites: CSC 715  and matriculated in a computer science graduate program, or permission of graduate program coordinator.

  
  • CSC 746 - Information Visualization

    3 Credit(s) This course presents theories and techniques behind information visualization and scientific visualization concerning the use of color, image representation, computer graphics, and scientific visualization. The course describes the principles of visual perception, information data types, and visual encoding of data representations, and then focuses on the study, design, and development of visualization techniques for the analysis, comprehension, explanation, and manipulation of large collections of datasets. The latest visualization toolkits will be applied to design and generate visual interpretation of large amounts of complex data. Three lecture hours per week.

    Pre-requisites: matriculated in a computer science graduate program or permission of graduate program coordinator.

  
  • CSC 755 - Computer Networks

    3 Credit(s) This course studies the fundamental principles in the design and implementation of computer communication networks, protocols, and applications. Topics to be covered include: layered network architectures, network applications, network programming interfaces, transport services, data link protocols, local area networks and network routing. Examples will be drawn primarily from the Internet TCP/IP protocol suite. Three lecture hours per week.

    Pre-requisites: CSC 795  and matriculated in a computer science graduate program, or permission of graduate program coordinator.

  
  • CSC 775 - Distributed and Cloud Computing

    3 Credit(s) This course introduces the design principles, system architectures and applications of parallel, distributed, and cloud computing systems, It aims to acquaint students with supercomputers, distributed and cloud computing systems for high-performance computing, research, e-commerce, social networking, and Internet applications. Topics include clustering, virtualization, cloud platform architecture, service-oriented architecture, cloud programming, security in distributed and cloud computing. Three lecture hours per week.

    Pre-requisite: CSC 795  and matriculated in a computer science graduate program, or permission of graduate program coordinator.

  
  • CSC 785 - Robotics

    3 Credit(s) This course presents the key aspects of autonomous systems including sensors, map-making, and path planning. The fundamentals of robotic manipulation will be presented, including coordinate transformations, manipulator kinematics, and motion. The course gives students hands-on-experience by working with various sensors and robotic kit. Knowledge of Linear Algebra is required before taking this course. Three lecture hours per week.

    Pre-requisites: matriculated in a computer science graduate program or permission of graduate program coordinator.

  
  • CSC 795 - Computer Systems

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the principles of computer systems and how these principles relate to the design of such systems. Both hardware and software concepts and the interdependence between them are studied. This course presents the functionalities, current design and implementation techniques of the operating system. The relationship between the operating system and computer architecture is discussed. Major topics include: processor architecture, processor implementation, computer memory, multithreading, multicore, and multiprocessor systems. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisite: Matriculated in a computer science graduate program or permission of graduate coordinator.
  
  • ECO 703 - Macroeconomics, Analysis and Policy

    3 Credit(s) Acquaints students with the general economic environment for business decision making. Topics include national accounts, government control, fiscal and monetary policy, income and employment theory, market structures, and economic systems.
  
  • ECO 710 - Economics for Managers

    3 Credit(s) This course applies microeconomic and macroeconomic analysis to business decision-making. Emphasis will be on current applications Microeconomic theories of supply, demand, market structure, production, pricing, and game theory will be applied to strategic decisions facing the individual units in the economy. Macroeconomic analysis will focus on GDP growth, inflation, unemployment, trade, monetary policy and fiscal policy in the context of the national and global economic environments within which industries and business operate.
  
  • ECO 713 - Economic Development

    3 Credit(s) The class covers theories of economic development dealing with economic growth and its causes, income inequality, poverty, population, urbanization, migration, education, health, and nutrition. The course explores agricultural transformation and rural development, and the impacts of development on the environment. Finally, the course links theories to development policy, evaluating the roles of markets and the state. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • ECO 715 - Managerial Economics and Policy

    3 Credit(s) This course develops skill in the systematic analysis of the microeconomic aspects of business decisions and in the development of quantitative data of the firm. It deals with an in-depth analysis of the market, the theory of consumer behavior, oligopoly, monopoly, perfect competition, optimal production, costs, profit maximization, corporate pricing and technology. The emphasis is on application of these topics to actual business problems in a competitive enterprise economy.
  
  • ECO 725 - Economics of Health Care

    3 Credit(s) This course is a survey of the organization of health care, the problems associated with various delivery systems, the utilization and availability of health care personnel, the growth and pressures exerted by third party payers and the study of the effects of government participation in the financing and delivery of health care.
    Pre-requisite: ECO 710  or ECO 715 .
  
  • ECO 751 - Topics in Economics for Teachers

    3 Credit(s) This institute will use an economic perspective and basic economic theories to study the people and places in the Commonwealth. This course will demonstrate how the study of institutions such as museums and public organizations, literature, and a basic knowledge of economic terms can create continuity in the history/social science curriculum. Technology enhanced teaching methods will be used to foster economic literacy and stimulate interest in the economics strand as assessed on the MTEL for Economics. VES and Blackboard will be used for communication and research. This class can be repeated as the topics and grade level will vary with each offering.
  
  • EDA 901 - Programmatic Assessment for Initial Education Licensure I

    0 Credit(s) The first in a series of performance-based program assessments, this course represents a required assessment for all Education initial licensure candidates. Students will describe the teaching moves and learning observed in an assigned video; drawing knowledge from coursework experienced prior to this assessment. The assessment allows students to demonstrate their ability to engage with course content and to apply that knowledge. Approximately 3 hours. Assessment results are factored into the gateway review process for program progression. No repeats. Special Grading.
    Pre-requisites:  Education Core courses appropriate to license. This course is a pre-requisite to registering for any Methods coursework.
  
  • EDA 902 - Programmatic Assessment for Initial Education Licensure II

    0 Credit(s) The second in a series of performance-based program assessments, this course represents a required assessment for all Education initial licensure candidates. Students will describe the teaching moves and learning observed in an assigned video; drawing knowledge from coursework experienced prior to this assessment. The assessment allows students to demonstrate their ability to engage with course content and to apply that knowledge. Approximately 10 hours. Assessment results are factored into the gateway review process for program progression. No repeats. Special Grading.
    Pre-requisite: Completion of EDA 901  and concurrent enrollment in both Methods I or equivalent and EDA 903 .
  
  • EDA 903 - Programmatic Assessment for Initial Education Licensure III

    0 Credit(s) As the third in a series of performance-based program assessments, this course represents a required assessment for all Education initial licensure candidates. Students will present a description of their own teaching to a faculty panel. Candidates focus on thorough and careful description of practice with accompanying artifacts. Approximately 10 hours. Assessment results are factored into the gateway review process for program progression. No repeats. Special Grading.
    Pre-requisite: Completion of EDA 901  and concurrent enrollment in both Methods 1 or equivalent and EDA 902 .
  
  • EDA 904 - Programmatic Assessment for Initial Education Licensure IV

    0 Credit(s) The fourth in a series of performance-based program assessments, this course represents a required assessment for all Education initial licensure candidates. Students will review a family-based case study; then analyze the interaction and create a follow up plan. The assessment allows students to demonstrate their ability to engage with course content and to apply that knowledge. Approximately 10 hours. Assessment results are factored into the gateway review process for program progression. No repeats. Special Grading.
    Pre-requisites: Completion of EDA 902  and  EDA 903  and concurrent enrollment in both Methods II or equivalent and EDA 905  .
  
  • EDA 905 - Programmatic Assessment for Initial Education Licensure V

    0 Credit(s) As the fifth in a series of performance-based program assessments, this course represents a required assessment for all Education initial licensure candidates. Students will present a description of their own teaching to a faculty panel. Candidates focus on thorough and careful analysis of practice with accompanying artifacts. Approximately 10 hours. Assessment results are factored into the gateway review process for program progression. No repeats. Special Grading.
    Pre-requisites: Completion of EDA 902  and EDA 903  and concurrent enrollment in both Methods II or equivalent and EDA 904  .
  
  • EDC 705 - Assessment and Instructional Practice

    1.5 Credit(s) In this course, candidates are introduced to the core concepts of formative and summative assessment. Through an exploration of a variety of assessments, candidates gain an understanding of how formative and summative assessment support their instructional practice and student outcomes. Candidates will create assessments and ascertain when and why certain assessments are appropriate. Candidates will develop approaches to communicating based on assessment data with colleagues and families. Field-based assignments required.
    1.5 lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisites: EDC406 Literacy Development II, Admission to the combined undergraduate/graduate licensure program
  
  • EDC 710 - Fundamentals of Lesson Planning

    1.5 Credit(s) This course provides students with a foundation in the skill of writing lesson plans. Anchored in the Backwards Design approach to lesson planning, this course will guide students towards an in-depth understanding of the various components of lesson plans. Students will also gain familiarity and facility with the state and national standards that are relevant to their intended discipline or grade range and will utilize standards to guide the development of lessons. 1.5 lecture hours per week.
    Co-requisite: EDC 716A  and EDC 715  
  
  • EDC 715 - Elementary Pre-Practicum Seminar I

    .5 Credit(s) This course, which takes place during the first semester of the M.Ed. in Elementary Education, brings students together as a cohort, provides an opportunity for students to discuss and integrate their initial fieldwork, and provides an introduction to the work of the profession.
    Co-requisite: EDC 716A  
  
  • EDC 716 - Elementary Full time Pre-Practicum

    1.5 - 3 Credit(s) This field placement component accompanies the four elementary methods courses in the M.Ed. in Elementary Education. This course provides intensive experience and guidance in the field as students learn and practice instruction across all four core content areas of the elementary curriculum. Students will be in the field full time across the semester.
    Pre-requisite:  EDC 715 , by permission only.

     

  
  • EDC 716A - Elementary Pre-Practicum I

    .5 Credit(s) This field placement component accompanies the initial coursework that students in the M.Ed. in Elementary Education complete during their first semester in the program. This fieldwork serves as an introduction to the profession and provides an ongoing “text” for exploring the career of an elementary educator.
    Co-requisite: EDC 715  and EDC 795A  
  
  • EDC 720 - Literacy Methods in the Early Primary Grades

    3 Credit(s) This course emphasizes responsive and developmentally appropriate instructional strategies for teaching literacy in the early primary grades while creating a safe and collaborative learning environment that motivates children to take academic risks, challenge themselves and claim ownership of their learning. In this course, teacher candidates develop and teach small and whole group lessons and apply evidence-based strategies in support of literacy and language development, as well as state standards. The role of literacy assessment in differentiating instruction is emphasized, along with the importance of setting clear and high expectations, collaboration and communication with families, valuing diversity, and understanding social-emotional aspects of learning. Field-based assignments are required. To be taken concurrently with pre-practicum fieldwork seminar. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisite:  EDC 406: Literacy Development II. Admission to the combined undergraduate/graduate licensure program

     

  
  • EDC 721 - Social Studies and Creative Arts in the Early Primary Grades

    3 Credit(s) This course consists of the exploration of the Arts and Social Studies as they impact learning experiences in the early primary grades. Visual and performing arts will be emphasized in a learning environment that helps children become more aware of their geographic and social surroundings, promoting play that leads to genuine learning, particularly related to civic understanding and identiy. Three lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisite: EDC 406 Literacy Development II
    Co-requisite:  EDC 733  
       
  
  • EDC 722 - Mathematics Methods in the Early Primary Grades

    3 Credit(s) This course offers pre-service early childhood teachers opportunities to design and implement productive mathematical experiences based on national and state standards and designed to get all children actively involved in doing developmentally appropriate mathematics via learning that facilitates discovery and problem solving. Students will assess students’ knowledge, skills and strategies to continually support the variety of needs of all learners. Three lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required
    Pre-requisite: EDC 406 Literacy Development II
    Co-requisite: EDC 734  
  
  • EDC 723 - Science Methods in the Early Primary Grades

    3 Credit(s) This course is a hands-on, inquiry-based approach to teaching science. Topics will include physical, earth, and life sciences, as well as health and engineering. Students will examine how to approach these subjects in a developmentally appropriate manner in order to achieve instructional objectives in grades pre-K-2. Emphasis will be on learning how students construct an understanding of science concepts and how to design lessons, and integrated units. Field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisite: EDC 406 Literacy Development II.
    Co-requisite: EDC 734  
  
  • EDC 733 - Fieldwork Seminar III: Creating Effective Learning Environments in the Early Primary Grades

    1.5 Credit(s) This field seminar, taken in conjunction with field-based methods courses on how to teach content in the early primary grades, focuses on how to create warm, nurturing, intellectually challenging, and educationally effective learning environments for young children. Topics include how to talk to children, how to help children learn to self-regulate, and child-guidance strategies. This seminar will also provide a forum for students in this cohort-based program to process their own instructional practice, carried out in their field placements, and to build connections within their program cohort. 1.5 lecture hours per week. Includes field-based assignments.
    Pre-requisite: EDC 406 Literacy Development II
  
  • EDC 734 - Fieldwork Seminar IV: Creating Effective Learning Environments in the Early Primary Grades

    1.5 Credit(s) This pre-practicum seminar, taken in conjunction with field-based methods courses on how to teach content in the early primary grades, focuses on how to create warm, nurturing, intellectually challenging, and educationally effective learning environments for young children. Topics include how to use play to advance children’s learning, how to use effective questioning techniques, and methods of assessment. This seminar will also provide a forum for students in this cohort-based program to process what they are seeing in their field placements, Includes required weekly fieldwork of two mornings per week.
    Pre-requisite: EDC 406, Literacy Development II

     

  
  • EDC 736 - Early Childhood Pre-Practicum

    1.5 Credit(s) This 75 hour field placement component is taken within the first of the three early childhood methods courses in the M.E.d in Early Childhood Education. This course provides experience and guidance in
    the field as students learn developmentally-appropriate practice across the early childhood curriculum. Students will be in the field for five hours per week across the semester, or the equivalent.
    Pre-requisite: Completion of introductory courses
    Co-requisite: This course should be taken with the first practice-level course
  
  • EDC 740 - Literacy Methods in the Elementary Grades

    3 Credit(s) This course emphasizes responsive and developmentally appropriate instruction for teaching literacy in culturally and linguistically diverse early childhood and elementary settings. Candidates design and implement instruction for small and large groups by applying assessment data and evidence-based strategies in support of reading and writing development and include state standards. The role of assessment in  differentiating instruction is emphasized. Candidates evaluate digital and print instructional materials and integrate literacy into other disciplines. Three lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisite:  EDC 406 Literacy Development II. Admission to the combined undergraduate/graduate licensure program.
  
  • EDC 741 - Social Studies Methods in Elementary Grades

    3 Credit(s) This course promotes best practices of various inquiry-based, developmentally-appropriate, hands-on teaching strategies in the social studies that shape effective lesson planning, implementation, and assessment for elementary grade students of varied abilities. The goal of social studies education is to facilitate active citizenship by increasing procedural and informational knowledge and critical thinking about the national and state standards for social studies content and skills. This course is geared toward increasing teacher candidates’ awareness and knowledge of what social studies education is, and how best to teach the subject area by examining the intricate history of relationships between individuals and the local, national and global communities in which they reside. New technologies and advancements in teaching will be introduced and examined. Three lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisite: EDC 406 Literacy Development II.
    Co-requisite: EDC 753 , Admission to the combined undergraduate/graduate licensure program
  
  • EDC 742 - Mathematics in Elementary Grades

    3 Credit(s) This course offers pre-service teachers opportunities to plan and implement productive mathematical experiences so that all children will  be able to position themselves as knowers and doers of mathematics. Through analyzing and evaluating current curriculum and materials, and using a  variety of assessment techniques, pre-service teachers will gain experiences designing lessons based on national and state standards, that accommodate the various needs of all learners. The course will focus on problem soling approaches that will help children develop deep conceptual understanding and proedural fluency. Three lecture hours per week. Field based assigments are required.
    Pre-requisite: EDC 406 Literacy Development II or EDU 725  

     
  
  • EDC 743 - Science Methods in Elementary Grades

    3 Credit(s) A hands-on approach to science with presentations and experiences in teaching physical, earth, health, engineering, and life sciences appropriate for setting and achieving instructional objectives in grades 1-6. Emphasis will be on learning how students construct understanding of science concepts and how to design lessons and learning experiences to actively involve students in inquiry and hands-on discovery. Three lecture hours per week plus field experiences. Field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisites: EDC 406 Literacy Development II.
    Co-requisite EDC 754  
  
  • EDC 753 - Fieldwork Seminar III: Classroom Management in the Elementary Grades

    1.5 Credit(s) This course is the first semester of a two-part senior year field seminar, which complements the elementary methods courses. Through this intentional learning community seminar, students will engage in conversations relevant to their growing skills as elementary educators. The backdrop to the seminar will be the pre-practicum field experience, including engagement in elementary classrooms, with a focus on developing and implementing strategies for classroom management and community building in the elementary classroom. This seminar provides a forum for students in this cohort-based program to process what they are seeing in their field placements. This seminar also supports students in developing the skills necessary to be successful in the profession.
    Pre-requisites: EDC 452 Fieldwork Seminar II: Critical Issues and Effective Practices in the Elementary Grades.
  
  • EDC 754 - Fieldwork Seminar IV: Classroom Management in the Elementary Grades

    1.5 Credit(s) This course is the second semester of a two-part senior year field seminar, which complements the elementary methods courses. Through this intentional learning community seminar, students will engage in conversations relevant to their growing skills as elementary educators. The backdrop to the seminar will be the pre-practicum field experience, including engagement in elementary classrooms, with a focus on developing and implementing strategies for classroom management and community building in the elementary classroom. This seminar provides a forum for students in this cohort-based program to process what they are seeing in their field placements. This seminar also supports students in developing the skills necessary to be successful in the profession.
    Pre-requisites: EDC 753  
  
  • EDC 760 - Adolescent Literacy in the Disciplines

    3 Credit(s) Why do adolescents struggle when reading and writing content-area texts? How do secondary teachers match students with texts, and which strategies are used to support student learning of complex information from content-area texts? To address these questions, aspiring teachers in this course will do the following: assess a range of adolescents’ reading and writing strengths and area of need, including the specific needs of English learners and student from underrepresented populations; analyze a variety of texts and match those texts to particular students and specific instructional goals; select and teach academic vocabulary; plan and pilot reading and writing instruction that promotes culturally responsive disciplinary literacy and content-area learning. Course participants will end the course by creating and adapting literacy strategies that they will collaboratively pilot with colleagues in class and with secondary students in local schools to better support secondary discipline-specific literacy instruction for a wide variety of learners and classroom contexts. Three lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisites: EDC 115 Exploring Education; Admission to the combined undergraduate/graduate licensure program.
  
  • EDC 762 - Technology Methods

    1.5 Credit(s) This course is designed to provide candidates in the teacher licensure program with experience using and teaching with educational technology while they are taking the Methods I pre-practicum course. Through hands on experience with computer hardware, software, and web-based tools, candidates will gain knowledge, confidence, and experience in using technology to facilitate teaching and learning appropriate for the needs of diverse learners and across varied subject areas. This course covers topics including best practices in classroom technology and instructional design, lesson planning with technology, and ethical concerns. One and a half lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisite: acceptance into the licensure program.
    Co-requisite: Program-specific Methods I course
  
  • EDC 763 - Classroom Management and Community Building

    1.5 Credit(s) In this course, pre-practicum field experiences will serve as the foundation to examine a wide array of philosophies, programs, and strategies that facilitate a caring, inclusive, respectful classroom where learners and the adults who care for them, feel safe and empowered. The course will create an environment that models communities of practice. Teacher candidates will also explore various social emotional programs for diverse schools, as well as approaches to family engagement. One and a half lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisite: Acceptance into the licensure program.
    Co-requisite: Program-specific Methods II course
  
  • EDC 770 - Methods of Teaching English I

    3 Credit(s) This course is the first of two designed to provide students with the training to be a teacher of English at the middle or high school level. It will offer a general study of the background and philosophies of teaching English, with a focus on methods and materials in the classroom, curricular issues and professional concerns, analysis of the teaching/learning processes, and a study of relevant national standards and the Massachusetts state standards for English. The course represents a continuation of students’ growth in attaining the Professional Standards for Teaching (PSTs), revisiting many of them at the practice level before demonstrating them in the practicum semester. Three lecture hours per week. Field placement and field-based assignments required.
    Pre-requisites: Permission of the department chairperson and acceptance into the licensure program.
  
  • EDC 771 - Methods of Teaching English II

    3 Credit(s) This course is the second of two designed to provide students with the training to be a teacher of English at the middle or high school level. It will offer a general study of the background and philosophies of teaching English, with a focus on methods and materials in the classroom, curriculum issues and professional concerns, analysis of the teaching/learning processes, and a study of relevant national standards and the Massachusetts state standards of English. The course represents a continuation of students’ growth in attaining the Professional Standards fpr Teaching (PST’s),revisiting many of them at the practice level before demonstrating them in the practicum semester. Three lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisites: Permission of the department chairperson and acceptance into the licensure program. EDC 770  
     
  
  • EDC 772 - Methods of Teaching History and the Social Sciences I

    3 Credit(s) This course is the first of two designed to provide students with the training to be a teacher of History and Social Studies at middle or high school level. It will offer a general study of the background and philosophies of teaching History and Social Studies, with a focus on methods and materials in the classroom, curricular issues and professional concerns, analysis of the teaching/learning processes, and a study of relevant national standards and the Massachusetts state standards for History and Social Studies. The course represents a continuation of student’s growth in attaining the Professional Standards of Teaching (PSTs), revisiting many of them at the practice level before demonstrating them in the practicum semester. Three lecture hours per week. Field placement and field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisites: Permission of the department chairperson and acceptance into licensure program.
     
  
  • EDC 773 - Methods of Teaching History and the Social Sciences II

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to provide students with the training to be a teaching historian by continuing and extending the conversations and learning begun in EDC 772  . It will offer a general study of the background and philosophies of teaching History, with a focus on methods and materials in the classroom, curriculum issues and professional concerns, analysis of the teaching/learning processes, reinforcement of national standards and the Massachusetts Common Core, and an introduction to the appropriate professional organization requirements. Three lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisites: Permission of the department chairperson and acceptance into the licensure program.
    Co-requisite: EDC 763  
  
  • EDC 774 - Methods of Teaching Mathematics I

    3 Credit(s) This course is the first of two designed to provide students with the training to be a teacher of Mathematics at the middle or high school level. It will offer a general study of the background and philosophies of teaching Mathematics, with a focus on methods and materials in the classroom, curricular issues and professional concerns, analysis of the teaching/learning processes, and a study of relevant national standards and the Massachusetts state standards for Mathematics. The course represents a continuation of students’ growth in attaining the Professional Standards for Teaching (PSTs), revisiting many of them at the practice level before demonstrating them in the practicum semester. Three lecture hours per week. Field placement and field-based assignments required.
    Pre-requisites: Permission of the department chairperson and acceptance into licensure program.
  
  • EDC 775 - Methods of Teaching Mathematics II

    3 Credit(s) This course is the second of two designed to provide students with the training to be a teacher of Mathematics at the middle or high school level. It will offer a general study of the background and philosophies of teaching Mathematics, with a focus on methods and materials in the classroom, curricular issues and professional concerns, analysis of the teaching/learning processes, and a study of relevant national standards and the Massachusetts state standards for Mathematics. The course represents a continuation of students’ growth in attaining the Professional Standards for Teaching (PSTs), revisiting many of them at the practice level before demonstrating them in the practicum semester. Three lecture hours per week. Field placement and field-based assignments required.
    Pre-requisites: Permission of the department chairperson and acceptance into licensure program. EDC 774  
  
  • EDC 776 - Methods of Teaching Art I

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to provide students with the training to be a teacher of Visual Arts for grades PK-12. It will offer a general study of the background and philosophies of teaching Visual Arts, with a focus on methods and materials in the classroom, curriculum issues and professional concerns, analysis of the teaching/learning processes, reinforcement of state standards, and an introduction to the appropriate professional organization requirements. Three lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisites: Permission of the department chairperson and acceptance into the licensure program.
    Co-requisite: EDC 762  
  
  • EDC 777 - Methods of Teaching Art II

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to provide students with the training to be a teacher of Visual Arts for grades PK-12 by continuing and extending the conversations and learning begun in EDC 776  . It will offer a general study of the background and philosophies of teaching Visual Arts, with a focus on methods and materials in the classroom, curriculum issues and professional concerns, analysis of the teaching/learning processes, reinforcement of state standards, and an introduction to the appropriate professional organization requirements. Three lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisites: Permission of the department chairperson and acceptance into the licensure program.
    Co-requisite: EDC 763  
  
  • EDC 778 - Methods of Teaching Secondary Science I

    3 Credit(s) This course is the first of two designed to provide students with the training to be a teacher of Secondary Science at the middle or high school level. It will offer a general study of the background and philosophies of teaching Secondary Science, with a focus on methods and materials in the classroom, curricular issues and professional concerns, analysis of the teaching/learning processes, and a study of relevant national standards and the Massachusetts state standards for Secondary Science. The course represents a continuation of students’ growth in attaining the Professional Standards for Teaching  a (PSTs), revisiting many of them at the practice level before demonstrating them in the practicum semester. Three lecture hours per week. Field placement and field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisite: Permission of the department chairperson and acceptance into licensure program
  
  • EDC 779 - Methods of Teaching Secondary Science II

    3 Credit(s) This course is the second of two designed to provide students with the training to be a teacher of Secondary Science at the middle or high school level. It will offer a general study of the background and philosophies of teaching Secondary Science, with a focus on methods and materials in the classroom, curricular issues and professional concerns, analysis of the teaching/learning processes, and a study of relevant national standards and the Massachusetts state standards for Secondary Science. The course represents a continuation of students’ growth in attaining the Professional Standards for Teaching (PSTs), revisiting many of them at the practice level before demonstrating them in the practicum semester. Three lecture hours per week. Field placement and field-based assignments are required.
    Prerequisites: EDC 778 , Permission of the department chairperson and acceptance into licensure program.
  
  • EDC 780 - Methods of Teaching Elementary Physical Education

    3 Credit(s) This course is the first of two designed to provide students with the training to be a teacher of physical education at the elementary school level. It will offer a general study of the background and philosophies of teaching physical education, with a focus on methods and materials in the classroom, curricular issues and professional concerns, analysis of the teaching/learning processes, and a study of relevant national standards and the Massachusetts state standards for physical education. The course represents a continuation of students’ growth in attaining the Professional Standards for Teaching (PSTs), revisiting many of them at the practice level before demonstrating them in the practicum semester. Three lecture hours per week. Field placement and field-based assignments required.
  
  • EDC 781 - Methods of Teaching Secondary Physical Education

    3 Credit(s) This course is the second of two designed to provide students with the training to be a teacher of Secondary Physical Education at the middle or high school level. It will offer a general study of the background and philosophies of teaching Secondary Physical Education, with a focus on methods and materials in the classroom, curricular issues and professional concerns, analysis of the teaching/learning
    processes, and a study of relevant national standards and the Massachusetts state standards for Physical Education. The course represents a continuation of students’ growth in attaining the Professional Standards for Teaching (PSTs), revisiting many of them at the practice level before demonstrating there in the practicum semester. Three lecture hours per week.  Field placement and field based assignments are
    required.
    Pre-requisite: Permission of the department chair person and acceptance into licensure program.
  
  • EDC 782 - Methods of Teaching Spanish I

    3 Credit(s) The class will survey the history and theory of foreign language teaching at the elementary level. A thorough review of National Standards, the Massachusetts Frameworks and ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines will be conducted. Topics researched and practiced include teaching resources, curriculum development, unit planning, classroom management, testing and assessment, and the use of technology in teaching Spanish at the elementary level. The course includes a 45 hours pre-practicum experience at an area elementary school and is conducted in
    Spanish. The course represents a continuation of students’ growth in attaining the Professional Standards for Teaching (PSTs), revisiting many of them at the practice level before demonstrating them in the practicum semester. Three lecture hours per week. Field placement and field-based assignments required.
    Pre-requisites: Permission of the department chairperson and acceptance into licensure program.
  
  • EDC 783 - Methods of Teaching Spanish II

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to provide students with the training to be a Spanish teacher. To accomplish this, it will survey a general study of the background and philosophies of teaching Spanish, focus on methods and materials in the classroom, investigate curriculum issues and professional concerns, analyze the teaching/learning processes, reinforce National Standards and the Massachusetts Framework, and introduce the appropriate professional organization requirements. Three lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisite:  Permission of the department chairperson.
    Co-requisites: EDC 763  
  
  • EDC 784 - Methods of Teaching Theatre I (PK-5)

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to provide students with the training to be a teacher of Theatre in grades PK-5. The course offers a general study of the background and philosophies of teaching dramatic arts in elementary and early childhood classrooms. Students will explore methods and materials, investigate curriculum issues and professional concerns, and analyze the teaching/learning processes, The course also reinforces National Association of Schools of Theatre standards and the Massachusetts Arts Frameworks and introduces the appropriate professional organization requirements. Examination of theatre programs in local schools will be part of the course. Drama across the curriculum and drama for ELLs and students with special needs will be addressed. Three lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisites: Permission of the department chairperson and acceptance into the licensure program.
    Co-requisite: EDC 762  
  
  • EDC 785 - Methods of Teaching Theatre II (Secondary)

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to provide students with the training to be a teacher of Theatre at the secondary level. The course offers a general study of the background and philosophies of teaching dramatic arts in middle and high school classrooms. Students will explore methods and materials, investigate curriculum issues and professional concerns, and analyze the teaching/learning processes, The course also reinforces National Association of Schools of Theatre standards and the Massachusetts Arts Frameworks. Examination of and participation in theatre programs in local schools will be part of the course. Drama across the curriculum and drama for ELLs and students with special needs will be addressed. Three lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisites: Permission of the department chairperson and acceptance into the licensure program.
    Co-requisite: EDC 763  
  
  • EDC 795A - Universal Design for Learning Foundations

    1 Credit(s)
    All teachers teach all students; therefore all teachers must prepare to work with students with exceptional learning needs (ELN). This course will develop candidates’ understanding of the collaborative roles of professionals who work with families to support students with ELN. It is designed to provide an overview of Response to Intervention (RTI) and eligibility for special education, and a general education teacher’s responsibilities in these processes.
    Co-requisite: EDC 716A  
  
  • EDC 795B - Universal Design for Learning Methods

    1 Credit(s) This UDL Methods course will develop candidates’ understanding and creation of an inclusive, welcoming classroom environment where all learners thrive through the use of differentiated instruction, and universal designs for learning. Topics include: meeting diverse learning needs, utilizing Universal Designs for Learning to set goals, design lessons and assessments, and differentiation. This is the second of a three part series of courses.
    Pre-requisite:  EDC 795A  
    Co-requisite: EDC 716  
  
  • EDC 795C - Universal Design for Learning Practice

    1 Credit(s) This UDL Practice course is designed to provide opportunities for students to put UDL principles and strategies into practice as part of their field work semester. This course will address how to create and enact lesson plans that reflect the standards and goals of lessons using UDL supports and strategies. Students will learn how to include assistive technology into their plans to support a wide range of learners. This is the third of a three part series of courses. Field work required.
    Pre-requisiteEDC 795B  
  
  • EDC 796 - Classroom Management Seminar for Elementary School and Early Childhood Settings

    1.5 Credit(s) This seminar prepares candidates to plan and enact classroom management strategies that support effective teaching and learning in the elementary classroom. Candidates will explore the many factors to consider in the domain of classroom management, with a special emphasis on positive behavior supports. An overview of learning and developmental theories will establish a basis for understanding the goals of behavior modification. This seminar will provide an avenue for students to actively process their management experiences in the field and to provide feedback in order to revise their practice. 1.5 lecture hours per week.

     

  
  • EDC 804 - School-Based Internship

    3 Credit(s) Building on the student teaching experience, this course provides candidates with an opportunity to gain continued experience in school-based settings, as they synthesize and apply their knowledge in the real-world context of a school. In collaboration with school staff and with the approval of the course instructor, candidates will design an internship will advance both the work of the school and their own professional development and reflect on their professional development and contributions to student learning. A weekly seminar will assist candidates with internship design, identification of resources, implementation, and shared reflection on the experience, as well as professional development for their job searches. Three lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisites: Student teaching practicum.

     

  
  • EDC 805 - The Professional Lives of Teachers: Connecting Policy, Research, and Practice through Collaborative Inquiry

    3 Credit(s)

    This course introduces participants to some of the local, state and federal educational policies and reforms that shape schools and classrooms today and to their role as student advocates. It invites participants to collaboratively explore policy, research and practice connections related to school-based challenges. Participants will become active consumers of educational research and policy documents and consider how they can act as advocates on behalf of their students both within the walls of the school and beyond with particular attention to creating environments in which students’ diverse backgrounds, strengths and challenges are respected. Participants will build an understanding that teachers share responsibility for the performance of all students within a school and how to take action on behalf of students. They will explore ways in which they can work collaboratively with colleagues and draw upon outside resources in order  to act as change agents within schools or larger educational contexts through the use or careful critique of policy and research. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisites: Matriculation in a graduate Education program at Salem State University

  
  • EDC 810 - Technology Methods in the Early Primary and Elementary Grades

    1.5 Credit(s) This course is designed to provide early childhood and elementary students with an introduction to common educational technology while they are in their full practicum. Through hands-on experience with computer hardware, software, and web-based tools, participants will gain experience-based knowledge and confidence in using technology to facilitate learning appropriate for the needs of diverse learners and across varied subject areas in early primary and elementary grades. This course covers topics including best practices in classroom technology and instructional design, age appropriate lesson planning with technology, and ethical concerns. One and a half lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisite: EDS 860  
  
  • EDC 815 - Legal and Ethical Issues for Early Childhood and Elementary Educators

    1.5 Credit(s) While working to meet the unique needs of students in our classrooms, teachers often encounter dilemmas that highlight the legal and ethical decisions that one must make as a professional working with young people. This course will introduce prospective early childhood and elementary teachers to their legal responsibilities regarding children’s well-being and begin to engage them in conversations about challenging ethical issues that they might encounter in their practice. For example, students will consider when and how to involve external services in advocating on behalf of a child’s rights and well-being or how to negotiate with colleagues who hold different viewpoints. Field-based assignments required.
    Pre-requisite: EDS 860  
  
  • EDC 829 - PreKindergarten/Kindergarten Practicum

    1.5 Credit(s) This is a half-semester supervised practicum experience in a pre-kindergarten or kindergarten classroom. In this course, teacher candidates provide high quality and coherent instruction, design and administer authentic and meaningful student assessments, analyze student performance and growth data, use this data to improve instruction, provide their students with constructive feedback on an on-going basis, and continuously refine learning objectives. Candidates support the learning and growth of all students through instructional practices that establish high expectations, create a safe and effective classroom environment, and demonstrate cultural proficiency. Full-day, 200 hour, half-semester field placement in a pre-kindergarten or kindergarten setting is required.
    Pre-requisites: EDU 822 , EDU 739 , EDU 823  , EDU 736  
    Co-requisites: EDC 834S  
  
  • EDC 830 - Practicum I in Early Childhood Education

    3 Credit(s) This is a semester-long supervised practicum experience in an early primary grade. In this course, teacher candidates provide high quality and coherent instruction, design and administer authentic and meaningful student assessments, analyze student performance and growth data, use this data to improve instruction, provide their students with constructive feedback on an on-going basis, and continuously refine learning objectives. Candidates support the learning and growth of all students through instructional practices that establish high expectations, create a safe and effective classroom environment, and demonstrate cultural proficiency. Full-day, full-semester field placement is required.
    Pre-requisites: EDC 720  
    Co-requisites: EDC 835  
  
  • EDC 831 - Practicum II in Early Childhood Education

    3 Credit(s) This is the field placement component portion of a semester-long student teaching experience in an early primary grade. This course provides intensive guidance in planning, implementing, and assessing learning experiences for children in the early primary grades. Full-day, full semester field placement is required.
    Pre-requisite: EDC 830  
    Co-requisite: EDC 836  
  
  • EDC 832 - Half-Practicum in Early Childhood Education

    1.5 Credit(s) This is the field placement component portion of a half-semester-long student teaching experience in an early primary grade. This course provides intensive guidance in planning, implementing, and assessing learning experiences for children in the early primary grades. Full-day, half-semester field placement is required.
    Pre-requisite: EDC 830  
    Co-requisite: EDC 837  
  
  • EDC 834 - First/Second Grade Practicum

    1.5 Credit(s) This is a half-semester supervised practicum experience in a first or second grade classroom. In this course, teacher candidates provide high quality and coherent instruction, design and administer authentic and meaningful student assessments, analyze student performance and growth data, use this data to improve instruction, provide their students with constructive feedback on an on-going basis, and continuously refine learning objectives. Candidates support the learning and growth of all students through instructional practices that establish high expectations, create a safe and effective classroom environment, and demonstrate cultural proficiency. Full-day, 200 hour, half-semester field placement in a first or second grade setting is required.
    Pre-requisites: EDU 822 , EDU 739 , EDU 823 , EDC 736  
    Co-requisite: EDC 834S  
  
  • EDC 834S - Practicum Seminar in Early Childhood Education

    1.5- 3 Credit(s) This seminar is taken in conjunction with EDC 834 . First/Second Grade Practicum. The seminar provides pedagogical and content support to enhance the field experience(s). With a particular emphasis on effective strategies to collaborate with families as well as processes for collaborating effectively with colleagues, this seminar provides students seeking an initial license with a reflective complement to the full-time practicum. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisites:  EDU 822 , EDU 739 , EDU 823 , EDC 736  
    Co-requisite: EDC 834  

     

  
  • EDC 835 - Practicum Seminar I in Early Childhood Education

    3 Credit(s) This full semester seminar is taken in conjunction with the early childhood practicum.  The seminar provides pedagogical and content support to enhance the field experience. With a particular emphasis o effective strategies to collaborate with families as well as processes for collaborating effectively with colleagues, this seminar provides students seeking an initial license with a reflective complement to the full-time practicum.
    Pre-requisite: EDC 720  
    Co-requisite: EDC 850  

     

  
  • EDC 836 - Practicum Seminar II in Early Childhood Education

    3 Credit(s) This full semester seminar is taken in conjunction with the Practicum in Early Childhood Education practicum. The seminar provides pedagogical and content support to enhance the student teaching field experience. Along with the practicum, this course is designed exclusively for those students seeking Initial Licensure in Early Childhood Education. Full-day, full-semester field placement is required.
    Pre-requisite: EDC 830  
    Co-requisite: EDC 831  
  
  • EDC 837 - Half-Practicum Seminar in Early Childhood Education

    1.5 Credit(s) This half semester seminar is taken in conjunction with the Half-Practicum in Early Childhood Education practicum. The seminar provides pedagogical and content support to enhance the student teaching field experience. Along with the practicum, this course is designed exclusively for those students seeking Initial Licensure in Early Childhood Education. Full-day, full-semester field placement is required.
    Pre-requisite:  EDC 830  
    Co-requisite:  EDC 832  
  
  • EDC 850 - Practicum I in Elementary Education

    3 Credit(s) This is a semester-long supervised practicum experience in an elementary grade. In this course, teacher candidates provide high quality and coherent instruction, design and administer authentic and meaningful student assessments, analyze student performance and growth data, use this data to improve instruction, provide their students with constructive feedback on an on-going basis, and continuously refine learning objectives. Candidates support the learning and growth of all students through instructional practices that establish high expectations, create a safe and effective classroom environment, and demonstrate cultural proficiency. Full-day, full-semester field placement is required.
    Pre-requisite: EDC 740  
    Co-requisite: EDC 855  
  
  • EDC 851 - Practicum II in Elementary Education

    3 Credit(s) This is the field placement component portion of a semester-long student teaching experience in an elementary school. This course provides intensive guidance in planning, implementing, and assessing learning experiences for children in the elementary grades. Full-day, full-semester field placement is required.
    Pre-requisite: EDC 851  
    Co-requisite: EDC 856  
  
  • EDC 852 - Half-Practicum in Elementary Education

    1.5 Credit(s) This is the field placement component portion of a half-semester-long student teaching experience in an elementary school. This course provides intensive guidance in planning, implementing, and assessing learning experiences for children in the elementary grades. Full-day, half-semester field placement is required.
    Pre-requisite: EDC 850  
    Co-requisite: EDC 857  
  
  • EDC 855 - Practicum Seminar I in Elementary Education

    3 Credit(s) This full semester seminar is taken in conjunction with the elementary practicum. The seminar provides pedagogical and content support to enhance the field experience. With a particular emphasis on effective strategies to collaborate with families as well as processes for collaborating effectively with colleagues, this seminar provides students seeking an initial license with a reflective complement to the full-time practicum.
    Pre-requisite: EDC 740  
    Co-requisite: EDC 850  
  
  • EDC 856 - Practicum Seminar II in Elementary Education

    3 Credit(s) This second full semester seminar is taken in conjunction with Practicum II. The semester will continue to focus on strengthening the teacher candidate’s role in the classroom and provide students opportunities to develop fields of expertise in a school organization. Under the advisement of the classroom teacher, the supervisor and the seminar leader, the student will develop further areas of expertise in elementary education. The seminar provides pedagogical and content support to enhance the field experience. With the practicum, this course is designed exclusively for those students seeking Initial Licensure in Elementary Education. Full-day, full-semester field placement is required.
    Pre-requisite: EDC 850  
    Co-requisite: EDC 851  

     
  
  • EDC 857 - Half-Practicum Seminar in Elementary Education

    1.5 Credit(s) This half-semester seminar is taken in conjunction with EDC 852  Elementary Half-Practicum. The seminar provides pedagogical and content support to enhance the field experience. Along with the practicum, this course is designed exclusively for those students seeking Initial Licensure in Elementary Education. Full-day, half semester field placement is required.
    Pre-requisite: EDC 850  
    Co-requisite: EDC 852  
  
  • EDC 880P - Student Teaching Practicum in English (8-12)

    3 Credit(s) This is a semester-long supervised practicum experience. In this course, teacher candidates provide high quality and coherent instruction, design and administer authentic and meaningful student assessments, analyze student performance and growth data, use this data to improve instruction, provide their students with constructive feedback on an on-going basis, and continuously refine learning objectives. Candidates support the learning and growth of all students through instructional practices that establish high expectations, create a safe and effective classroom environment, and demonstrate cultural proficiency. Full-day, full-semester practicum placement is required.
    Pre-requisites: EDC 770 , EDC 771 , satisfactory completion of all MTEL tests and program coordinator approval.
    Co-requisite: EDC 880PS  
  
  • EDC 880PS - Practicum Seminar in Teaching English

    3 Credit(s) This full semester seminar is taken in conjunction with the student teaching practicum. The seminar provides pedagogical and content support to enhance the field experience. With a particular emphasis on effective strategies to collaborate with families as well as processes for collaborating effectively with colleagues, this seminar provides students seeking an initial license with a reflective complement to the full-time practicum.
    Pre-requisite:  EDC 771  
    Co-requisite: EDC 880P  
 

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