Feb 08, 2023  
2017-2018 School of Graduate Studies Catalog 
    
2017-2018 School of Graduate Studies Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Graduate Courses


 
  
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    ACC 720 - Financial Accounting for Managers

    3 Credit(s) Examines financial reporting as managerial communication about financial condition and performance to external users and as the basis for decision making by creditors and investors. Includes discussion of financial implication of reporting alternatives, the role of the external auditor, and risk management through internal controls.
  
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    ACC 800 - Accounting Analysis for Decision Making

    3 Credit(s) Identification and analysis of the accounting information that managers use to make decisions for the business and its functional areas. Four major topics are considered: managerial accounting concepts of cost behaviors and cost traceability using full cost and incremental cost models, approaches for structuring non-routine decisions, planning tools to motivate and coordinate employees, and the use of feedback to evaluate goal attainment.
    Pre-requisites: Matriculation into the MBA program; completion of all foundation courses or permission of Program Coordinator.
  
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    ACC 805 - Tax Factors in Business: A Decision Making Approach

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the effects of taxes on business decisions, focusing primarily on planning implications for sole proprietor ships, partnerships, and corporations. It also includes a general overview of tax laws regarding income, exclusions, deductions and credits.
    Prerequisites: BUS 802 
     
  
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    ACC 820 - Accounting for Governmental and Non-Profit Entities

    The objective of this course is to develop an understanding of GAAP and financial reporting standards for state and local governments and non-profit organizations. This course will include government accounting, budget preparation and control, fund accounting, debt and fixed asset accounting, financial and compliance reporting, and various other accounting, financial and compliance reporting, and various other accounting concepts applicable to governmental and non-profit accounting. Three lecture hour per week.
    Pre-requisites: Matriculation into the MSA program or permission of Program Coordinator.
  
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    ACC 830 - Advanced Accounting Systems

    3 Credit(s) This course provides an understanding of enterprise accounting systems structure and controls. Topics include current systems documentation techniques, industry internal control standards, internal control implementation, and IT auditing. Controls are demonstrated with a hands-on component that includes both transaction entry and the application controls within the software.
    Pre-requisites: Matriculation into the MBA program; completion of all foundation courses or permission of the Program Coordinator.
  
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    ACC 840 - Advanced Forensic Accounting

    3 Credit(s) This course applies forensic accounting principles, procedures and practices to financial statement fraud case analysis. Additionally, the course will focus on identifying red flags in fraudulent financial statements. The objective of this course is to allow students to identify financial statement fraud schemes. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisite:  Matriculation into the MSA program or permission of Program Coordinator.
  
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    ACC 850 - Corporate Financial Reporting

    3 Credit(s) This course provides an in depth analysis of financial reporting including advanced topics primarily related to investments, bonds, leases, pensions, income taxes, share based compensation, and the statement of cash flows. Emphasis is placed on both accounting concepts and applications. Financial reporting issues are examined from both preparer and user perspective. Students will develop a level of understanding sufficient to apply the concepts of accounting and be able to read and interpret material written at a professional level.
    Pre-requisites: Matriculation into the MBA program; completion of all foundation courses or permission of Program Coordinator;  
  
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    ACC 860 - Global Financial Reporting Issues

    3 Credit(s) This course provides an understanding of the international dimensions of accounting and financial reporting. Topics include foreign currency translation; financial reporting and changing prices; international financial reporting standards and analysis; financial risk management; international taxation issues and transfer pricing as well as other international financial reporting topics. Students will be able to prepare and analyze financial statements in the context of a complex global environment.
    Pre-requisites: Matriculation into the MBA program; completion of all foundation courses or permission of Program Coordinator.
  
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    ACC 870 - Advanced Auditing

    3 Credit(s) This course continues on from ACC 407 - Auditing Theory and Practice - or an equivalent course - by implementing the auditing principles, standards, procedures and practices learned in the first auditing course and applying them in case analysis. This class will use cases of past audit failures that will require students to spend considerable amount of time on researching auditing standards. Additional topics include the integrated audit of financial statements and internal controls; continuous auditing; other assurance services; auditing of computer-based systems; auditing software and computer auditing techniques used to evaluate accounting system controls and test accounting data integrity. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisites: Matriculation into the MSA program or permission of Program Coordinator.
  
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    ACC 890 - Financial Accounting Theory

    3 Credit(s) This course will develop student research skills that are necessary to identify a research question concerning U.S. or international accounting principles based upon a fact situation. The skills include the ability to find, analyze, and evaluate authoritative pronouncements and to effectively communicate the results of the research in clear, concise written and oral form. Problems and case studies will be utilized to examine controversial topics such as, but not limited to, asset impairment, accounting for intangibles, capitalization of software development costs, special purpose vehicles, lease accounting, income tax accounting, contingent liabilities, dept/equity hybrid securities, foreign currency translation, derivatives, pensions, and stock-based compensation. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisites:  Matriculation into the MSA program required or permission of Program Coordinator. Completion of all other MSA core courses recommended.
  
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    AGS 700 - Action Research Seminar

    6 Credit(s) This course, required of all CAGS candidates, will meet regularly over a two year period and include formal presentations, group discussions, and individual advising. Purposes include: (1) developing an understanding of the unique characteristics of action research; (2) assisting candidates in the identification of problems and design of action plans to be implemented within their own work settings; (3) monitoring the systematic acquiring, recording, and interpretation of data and evidence related to individual action plans. Information sources will include current educational research as well as relevant case studies from legal, medical and business-oriented professions.
    Pre-requisite: Acceptance into the Salem State University/Northeast Consortium CAGS Program.
  
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    AGS 705 - Diversity of Needs in Contemporary Classrooms

    3 Credit(s) This course will focus on issues of diversity and individual needs which affect curriculum and instruction, particularly as regulated by federal and state mandates. Scope of content includes multi-culturalism and exceptionality, and their impact on learning and behavior in school, home, business and community environments. Participants will gain knowledge of the characteristics of culturally diverse and special needs populations, and increase their understanding of causes underlying student’s attitudes, thoughts actions, and values. Addressed will be appropriate modifications of instruction, interaction and environment which enhance students’ personal, social and educational potential.
    Pre-requisite: Acceptance into the Salem State University/Northeast Consortium CAGS Program.
  
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    AGS 710 - Contemporary Thinking and Learning Theories

    3 Credit(s) This course will cover both the theoretical and practical aspects of teaching for thinking and for accommodating different learning styles, so that all students can realize their potential. Current theories of learning, intelligence, information processing, and creativity will be studied, as well as implications and applications of this research in school settings.
    Pre-requisite: Acceptance into the Salem State University/Northeast Consortium CAGS Program.
  
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    AGS 715 - Historical & Sociological Perspectives on Education

    3 Credit(s) This course will examine the social purposes of education and the role of the school in society in both historical and contemporary contexts. Topics will include traditional and current curriculum and policy responses to social needs, the school’s role in community education, the social responsibility of educators, and the function of schools in the economic order.
    Pre-requisite: Acceptance into the Salem State University/Northeast Consortium CAGS Program.
  
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    AGS 728 - Teacher Empowerment and Leadership

    3 Credit(s) This course is built around three major themes: (1) adult development; (2) the culture of educational organizations; and (3) teachers as leaders. The class will work through current readings, individual and group experiences, and their own reflection and writing to develop a greater sense of empowerment. Participants will develop the knowledge and skills to be articulate influences of educational practices at local, state and national levels.
    Pre-requisite: Acceptance into the Salem State University/Northeast Consortium CAGS Program.
  
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    AGS 730 - Learning to Lead

    3 Credit(s) This course introduces educators to the foundational theories and practices of adaptive leadership, with a particular focus on the ways in which teachers transition into formal and informal leadership roles. Emphasis will be placed on how to analyze a school’s needs through a leadership lens, how to build collaborative relationships across roles, and how to lead school change processes as part of a learning organization. Three lecture hours per week.

     

  
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    AGS 732A - Organizational & Fiscal Issues of Comprehensive School Management

    3 Credit(s) This course will focus on those organizational skills which influence the successful administration and management of a comprehensive school system. Particular emphasis will be given to Massachusetts General Law relevant to education, including the Education Reform Act of 1993; management of fiscal responsibilities and collaborative structures. Participants will examine these issues in a manner designed to develop understandings and skills needed to be an effective school administrator during these times of challenge and change.
  
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    AGS 734 - Leading Professional Learning

    3 Credit(s) Ongoing professional learning drives school improvement, transformation, and ultimately student learning. As informal and formal leaders, participants in this course will consider the research and tenets supporting effective professional learning: adult development theory, action space theory, and research-based professional learning mechanisms (e.g., coaching, cycles of inquiry, professional learning communities). Participants will use current research, simulations and class discussions to understand and design practical and effective professional learning experiences for colleagues Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    AGS 736 - Advanced Curriculum Design and Development

    3 Credit(s) This course examines alternative models of curriculum as expressions of various social and educational goals and provides experience in effective curriculum change. Students look critically at existing curricula and develop projects that respond to contemporary educational needs, new developments in knowledge and information, and new thinking about teaching and learning.
  
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    AGS 750 - Group Learning in Schools

    3 Credit(s) This course builds students’ understanding of the dynamics of small groups in schools. Students will examine the factors affecting the success or failure of small groups, gain experience in group work, and have the opportunity to develop practical and conceptual skills that will support group learning.
  
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    AGS 760 - Developmental Mentoring

    3 Credit(s) This course builds teacher leaders’/mentors’ skills as they work to create purposeful learning communities that sustain the professional learning of new educators. Purposeful learning communities support educators as they deepen their content knowledge, expand their pedagogical repertoire, strengthen their capacity to be reflective and develop the skills and habits necessary to collaboratively examine and improve their practice.
  
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    AGS 770 - Adult Learning in Schools

    3 Credit(s) This course builds an understanding of how adults learn and the conditions that support that learning. Using adult development theory and transformational learning theory, it builds in students the skills to create and sustain effective adult learning experiences in public schools.
  
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    AGS 800 - Facilitative Leadership

    3 Credit(s) This course builds participants’ ability to facilitate group meetings, design effective agendas, build consensus, make group decisions, and have difficult conversations. The course uses group theory and dynamics to help students learn the practical skills needed to build sustainable agreements and build professional communities that are reflective, collaborative, and built on shared norms and values. Three lecture hours per week.

     

  
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    AGS 825 - Leading School-Community Partnerships

    3 Credit(s) In order to facilitate lasting and meaningful change, aspiring school leaders need the tools and frameworks to support them in this work, which ultimately helps to improve organizational practice, capacity, and culture. In this course, aspiring school leaders will learn how to make strong connections within the school community, and among the school, local community, and community-based organizations. Partnering with families and local organizations is crucial to building organizational capacity in schools. In this course, students will learn tools and frameworks that can help them to forge meaningful, lasting school-community partnerships that benefit all levels of school organization and also support change processes. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    AGS 850 - Seminar in Educational Equity

    3 Credit(s) Participants in the course will consider the challenges, dilemmas and imperatives of ensuring the inclusion of multiple perspectives in all areas of the educational process. The course will help students build the skills and dispositions necessary to participate in and facilitate difficult conversations about equity in schools.
  
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    ART 702 - Crafts Workshop

    3 Credit(s) A workshop in 3-dimensional crafts. A variety of materials will be explored for their suitability to individual needs. Experiences will include clay, wood, metal and fabrics.
  
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    ART 703 - Teaching Photography in the Middle and High School

    3 Credit(s) This graduate studio course introduces students to the methods, practices and materials involved in teaching photography at the Middle and High School levels. Both chemical and digital processes will be demonstrated and explored. Darkroom work will include basic black and white printing processes, alternative processes including pinhole photography and hand coated emulsion; digital work will include the basic use of Adobe Photoshop to manipulate images. The use of both film and digital cameras will be explored. This course is an elective for MAT Art students and for continuing education students with permission of instructor. Four scheduled studio hours, plus five open studio hours per week.
    Pre-requisites: ART326 or equivalent. Permission of instructor and/or acceptance in MAT Art program.
  
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    ART 704 - Printmaking - Screenprinting

    3 Credit(s) An investigation of the theory, techniques and processes of screenprinting. The medium is explored as a viable means of artistic self expression. Four scheduled studio hours plus five open studio hours per week.
  
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    ART 706 - Art Printmaking-Monoprint

    3 Credit(s) An investigation of the theory, techniques and processes of monoprinting including stencil, collage, painted imagery, drypoint, and xerox transfer. The medium is explored as a viable means of artistic self expression. Four scheduled studio hours plus five open studio hours per week.
  
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    ART 708 - Research Methods in Contemporary Art Education

    3 Credit(s) This graduate level course utilizes both on-line and traditional classroom learning environments to introduce students to research in the field of Art Education. Students become familiar with the examination and analysis of both qualitative and quantitative forms of research paradigms. By exploring how various methodologies are used to interpret different types of data, students begin to formulate well-designed research projects.
    Prerequisite:
    Acceptance into Master of Arts in Teaching Art program.
  
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    ART 709 - Curriculum Frameworks and State Standards in Art Education Programs

    3 Credit(s) This graduate level course will examine the revised Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. Students will strengthen their skills of integration and assessment as they create in depth, innovative art lesson plans. Students will create well-crafted units of study based upon the Pre-K - 12 educational benchmarks set forth by the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks and the national Art education standards. Issues of review, state evaluations, and accreditation will be explored as students analyze a variety of contemporary curriculum models.
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Master of Arts in Teaching Art program.
  
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    ART 710 - Advanced Curriculum Development in Art Education

    3 Credit(s) This graduate level course focuses upon philosophical issues, historical structures, and content for developing art education curriculum in the secondary school and in a variety of contexts where art is taught.
    Prerequisite:
    Acceptance into the Master of Arts in Teaching Art program.
  
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    ART 712 - Advanced Color Photography

    3 Credit(s) This graduate level course builds upon students’ knowledge of the technical and aesthetic aspects of color photography. The theory of color, including color temperature and its effect on film filtration is studied. Students will gain knowledge of both film and digital media. Four scheduled studio hours plus five open studio hours per week.
    Prerequisites:
    Evidence of both basic and intermediate photographic course work completed, or satisfactory portfolio review.
  
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    ART 714 - Web Design in Studio Art

    3 Credit(s) To design and develop a website, including the layout, composition, and content. It will cover planning, implementing, updating and maintaining a professional Web site, file formats, an introduction to HTML, HTML editing software, and additional Web software. Four scheduled studio hours plus five open studio hours per week.
  
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    ART 717 - Painting

    3 Credit(s) A graduate level, studio course that will build upon students prior technical foundation. Through assignments and in-class projects, students will study the nature of raw artistic impulse while developing a mastery over various painting techniques and processes of critical thinking. This class will incorporate individual and group critiques and discussions. Four scheduled studio hours plus five open studio hours per week.
  
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    ART 719 - Relief-Printmaking Workshop

    3 Credit(s) An investigation of the relief process including wood and linoleum block printing, divided block printing, reduction and multiple block printing.
  
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    ART 721 - Drawing

    3 Credit(s) An opportunity for free creative response to a variety of drawing materials. Class work will stress development of perception, knowledge and self-expression through various approaches.
  
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    ART 730 - Workshop in Ceramics

    3 Credit(s) A workshop using clay as a material to provide learning experience in a three-dimensional medium. Basic exercises will include hand-building, wheel-throwing and sculpture. Students will be provided the opportunity to experiment with a variety of clay bodies and glaze formulations.
  
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    ART 732 - Topics in Contemporary Art

    3 Credit(s) An examination of the major trends in the visual arts and art criticism from 1950 to the present. Media discussed includes painting, sculpture, photography, architecture, and new genres. Art works will be studied in their cultural, social, and political contexts. Course requirements include frequent visits to Boston area galleries and museums at students’ expense.
  
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    ART 735 - Teaching Salem Cultural Resources

    3 Credit(s) This institute explores how teachers may use the museums, historic houses, and maritime material culture of Salem Massachusetts to instruct students in topics related to their discipline’s Massachusetts State Department of Education curriculum frameworks. Class lectures, readings, and discussions are augmented by a series of field trips, gallery talks, and walking tours. Teachers will develop a project that explores how specific content and performance goals may be taught with the significant visual and historical resources in the city.
  
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    ART 736 - The Arts in America From 1492-1900

    3 Credit(s) A study of American visual culture from the colonial period to 1900. Media examined include painting, sculpture, prints, photographs, architecture, and the decorative arts. Emphasis on the historical diversity of artistic practices derived from European, Native American, African American and Asian traditions. Frequent visits to museums and historic houses in Salem and Boston. Museum visits at students’ expense.
  
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    ART 746 - Advanced Portrait Photography

    3 Credit(s) This graduate course builds upon students’ previous knowledge and approaches to black and white and color photography. The course explores photography of the human form under both natural and artificial lighting, culminating in a thematic portfolio of finished work. Four scheduled studio hours plus five open studio hours per week.
    Prerequisite:
    Evidence of both basic and intermediate photographic course work completed, or satisfactory portfolio review.
  
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    ART 749 - Advanced Digital Photography

    3 Credit(s) This graduate level course builds upon students’ previous knowledge of the technical and aesthetic aspects of digital photography, including both the digital acquisition and manipulation of images, using both camera and computer. Four scheduled studio hours plus five open studio hours per week.
    Prerequisite: Evidence of both basic and intermediate photographic course work completed, or satisfactory portfolio review.
  
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    ART 750 - Cultural Diversity in Artistic Expression

    3 Credit(s) The Institute explores different outlooks and forms of communication reflected in art of diverse cultures. It relates the visual arts to music, dance, language and other creative expressions. Ideas presented are applied to educational activities, studio arts and art historical research; students elect projects in one of these areas. Particularly recommended for teachers.
  
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    ART 751 - Introduction to Teaching Visual Arts Pre-K-12 (Pre-Practicum)

    3 Credit(s) An introduction to the study of art education and the standards of the Massachusetts Department of Education Visual Arts Curriculum frameworks. Content includes the exploration of visual growth and art history in the Pre-K-12 curriculum. Current art education trends, cultural and ethnic influences, and working with children with special needs will be explored. Required of students enrolled in the Initial Licensure track of the MAT in Art.
    Prerequisite:
    Acceptance into the Initial licensure track of the Master of Arts in Teaching Art program or permission of instructor.

  
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    ART 752 - Visual Arts Teaching Grades Pre-K-8 Initial Licensure (Pre-Practicum)

    3 Credit(s) This pre-practicum course builds upon prior knowledge and experience provided in ART 751 . Students examine and develop visual arts lesson plans and interdisciplinary units of learning. Required of all students in the MAT in Art-Grades Pre-K-8 Initial track. Three hours per week plus a field component of 25 hours (for semester) is required, including classroom observation and some assisting in local schools.
    Prerequisite:
    Successful completion of ART 751 . Acceptance into the Grades Pre-K-8 Initial licensure track of the Master of Arts in Teaching Art program or permission of instructor. Reminder-All students must obtain a passing score on both parts of the Massachusetts Teachers’ Test before applying to a Practicum placement.

  
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    ART 753 - Middle and High School Visual Arts Teaching 5-12 Pre-Practicum

    3 Credit(s) An exploration of visual arts curriculum development utilizing instructional and assessment techniques. Students examine and develop units of learning directed towards grades 5-12 in the visual arts. A field component of 25 total hours of observations and some assisting in visual arts classroom in Massachusetts public schools are required. Required of student teaching candidates in the Initial track of the MAT in Art or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours per week plus completion of a total of 25 hours of field observations.
    Prerequisite: ART 751  and acceptance into the Initial track of the MAT in Art program or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 849 - Preparation for Art Education Thesis and Final Exhibition

    3 Credit(s) This course is a prerequisite for   and will prepare students to write a well documented thesis. Students will make an extensive review of recent literature in the field of art education to develop a research topic in depth. In preparaion for taking the study into the field, students will complete a summary of goals and purposes, and devise informed-consent documents. This course prepares students for the final exhibition of their artwork along with thematic and/or philosophical statements to accompany the artwork on display. Both traditional and electronic means of presentation will be taught.
    Prerequisites:  , and Permission of the Coordinator required
  
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    ART 850 - Art Education Thesis

    3 Credit(s) The Art Education Thesis is the final course in the MAT in Art Education. Under the supervision of the MAT in Art Faculty Program Coordinator, students use their knowledge of quantitative and qualitative research methods within the field of Arts Education, to develop and implement well-crafted arts-based research in their art education classrooms. The course culminates in a written thesis, supporting exhibition and documentation.
    Prerequisites:
      and successful completion of all required courses within the Master of Arts in Teaching Art program and permission of Program Coordinator. Initial license and previously completed Initial License Practicum clinical experience.
  
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    ART 875/876 - Directed Study

    Arranged Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a member of the Art Faculty.
  
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    BIO 700 - Research Methods in Teaching Science

    3 Credit(s) This course will enable the student to select and implement appropriate methodologies for conducting research in the teaching of science and to report the results of such research. It will also include methods of investigation and techniques for interpreting the appropriate professional literature. Three lecture/discussion hours per week and occasional field trips.
  
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    BIO 702 - Principles of Evolution

    3 Credit(s) Evolution is one of the most important and most widely misunderstood concepts in science. This is an online course to help students learn more about evolution deepening their understanding of evolutionary concepts.
    Prerequisites: BA or BS in a Natural Science and prior permission of the instructor.
  
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    BIO 705 - Topics in Aquaculture

    4 Credit(s) The course provides an overview of aquaculture with emphasis on applications in New England. Participants gain the skills needed to setup and operate a small, recirculating aquaculture system as a living laboratory in their classroom or to grow aquatic organisms for personal consumption or supplemental income.
    Prerequisites:
    Two upper level undergraduate courses in biology or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    BIO 706 - Estuarine Ecology

    4 Credit(s) This course provides an overview of estuarine environments, where freshwater meets saltwater. Interactions between the physical, chemical and biological components of an estuarine environment are explored and illustrated by field experiences. Participants gain a hands-on appreciation of the dynamic nature and ecological importance of estuarine environments. Emphasis is on methods for data collection and investigations appropriate for the classroom. This intensive 50-hour course may include field time outside of scheduled hours.
    Prerequisites:
    Two upper-level undergraduate courses in biology or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    BIO 714 - Topics in Molecular and Cell Biology: The Basis of Biotechnology

    3 Credit(s) Modern technology has greatly extended our ability to explore the biological and physical world. Specifically, the study of Cell and Molecular Biology has experienced unprecedented advances in recent years. Students will explore modern cell biology and examine its various applications through the growing field of Biotechnology, including gene therapy, genetic engineering, environmental remediation, agricultural enhancements and medical initiatives.
    Prerequisite:
    College-level Biology course or permission of the Instructor.
  
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    BIO 715 - Environmental and Conservation Biology

    3 Credit(s) Modern Biology often focuses on specific aspects of life, such as the components of the cell; sometimes investigators lose the “big picture” as to the structure and function of a complete system. Ecology involves the comprehensive study of entire ecosystems, incorporating chemical, physical and geologic parameters as part of biological processes. This course will review the basic principles of ecology as they define the world around us. Students will also study the impacts of humans on nature with special emphasis on current topics in conservation biology.
    Prerequisite:
    College-level Biology course or permission of the Instructor.
  
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    BIO 801N - Workshop in Field Biology

    3 Credit(s) A study of terrestrial and/or aquatic environments and the organisms inhabiting them at selected locations. The focus may include local habitats, other regions in the United States and selected foreign areas.
    Prerequisite:
    One year of College Biology.
  
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    BIO 875/876 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a member of the Biology Faculty.
  
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    BUS 700 - Graduate Business Institute

    3 Credit(s) Graduate Business Institute will offer lectures, discussions, media presentations and workshops with experts selected from academic, industry and government organizations. One or more business related topics of national and/or international importance will be selected by the instructor in consultation with other faculty, at least a semester prior to the course offering. These topic areas may not be usually found in the conventional classroom course. They will be carefully designed to facilitate the accomplishment of the objectives previously mentioned. It is anticipated that the proximity of the guest speakers and the opportunity for students to interact with their colleagues in a conference type setting will provide a meaningful experience to all. Students may take this course multiple times.
  
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    BUS 790 - Internship in Business

    3-12 Credit(s) An academic work program under the auspices of various business and non-profit organizations in areas directly related to the student’s interests in business administration. The student is also supervised by a faculty member who will maintain contact with the sponsoring organization and with the student during the internship.
  
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    BUS 802 - Legal and Ethical Environment

    3 Credit(s) A study of the legal and ethical framework within which the formal business organization must operate. Topics included are the law of contracts, sales, negotiable instruments, partnerships, corporations, bankruptcy, consumer protection, and agency. Emphasis will be placed on the rights and liabilities of all parties. Case study method will be used extensively.
    Prerequisites: Matriculation into the MBA program; completion of all foundation courses or permission of Program Coordinator.
  
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    BUS 840 - Managing in The Global Business Environment

    3 Credit(s) This course intensively scrutinizes the setting and scope of international business and the dimensions of multi-national enterprise. The student is expected to become skilled in the identifications of strategies and adaptations of functional activities in marketing, production and supply, finance and control, human resources, and government and public relations to deal with the differences to be encountered in exporting or making direct investments in foreign business environments.
    Prerequisites: Matriculation into the MBA program; completion of all foundation courses or permission of Program Coordinator, and BUS 802  
  
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    BUS 850 - Ethical Issues in Business

    3 Credit(s) This course explores the delicate balance between business profitability and ethical practice, particularly as it relates to governmental regulation, consumer welfare, employee relations and environmental concerns. Text material and selected case studies will be utilized to provide a vehicle for discussing and understanding the social responsibility of business as inseparable from its economic function.
  
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    BUS 860 - Entrepreneurship

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to examine the entrepreneurial process involved in new venture creation and start-ups. The approach is both conceptual and pragmatic. Students will understand entrepreneurship beyond the functional boundaries as an interdisciplinary, cross-functional activity. The course is ideal for individuals seeking to start their own businesses, and who wish to learn more about the analytic and creative processes involved in developing their ideas into a successful new venture. 
  
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    BUS 870 - Business Policy and Strategy

    3 Credit(s) Students must have successfully completed 36 credit hours prior to taking this course. Designed as a capstone course for students in the program, the course studies the strategies employed by corporations in planning, selecting and implementing objectives. Through analysis of various assigned cases, the student is expected to become skilled in the development and analysis of business strategy and policy, which requires familiarity with functional activities such as marketing, production, finance and human resource management.
    Prerequisites:
    Successful completion of 18 credit hours in the MBA program beyond the foundation courses, including BUS 802 , MGT 800 , MKT 805 , ACC 800 , and FIN 800 .

  
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    BUS 875/876 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a member of the Graduate Business Administration Faculty.
  
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    BUS 900 - Thesis

    6 Credit(s) Develop a research proposal based upon a critical review of research work performed by others, and identification of areas of knowledge gaps upon which to establish the main purpose of the investigation. Indicate importance and relative contribution that the research will make towards the body of knowledge. Establish research objectives, processes and methodology, information acquisition, techniques of data manipulation, assumptions and limitations, analysis and procedures, results, conclusions, and directions for further studies. Carry out research program, collect data and report on the results in a thesis to be presented orally and in writing.
  
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    CHE 701 - Chemistry and Its Applications for Middle School Teachers

    3 Credit(s) This course includes topics that illustrate how chemistry affects our lives and a description of the chemistry important in the topic. The topics may come from environmental science, energy, materials science, medicine and health. Along with participating in the projects, students will prepare lesson plans that they can use in their classrooms. Students will investigate possible topics for the thesis required for the MAT degree.
    Prerequisites:
    CHE 124 or the equivalent and admittance into the MAT in Middle School General Science program or the permission of the Instructor.
  
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    CHE 710 - Advanced Topics in Inorganic Chemistry

    3 Credit(s) This course involves a theoretical, chemical, and physical study of the following selected topics; electron configuration of atoms; the qualitative aspect of bonding in inorganic compounds and metal complexes, coordination chemistry, mechanism of inorganic reaction; period table; transition metal chemistry; and acid-base and non-aqueous chemistry.
    Prerequisites:
    Organic Chemistry and Inorganic Chemistry. Physical Chemistry is recommended but not required.
  
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    CHE 715 - Chemistry of the Elements

    3 Credit(s) This course involves a detailed study of the physical and chemical properties of selected elements and their compounds. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the study of those inorganic chemicals of commercial, environmental and ecological significance.
    Prerequisites:
    General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry and Physical Chemistry are recommended but not required.
  
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    CHE 725 - Topics in Organic and Biochemistry

    3 Credit(s) This course will involve a study of select areas of organic and biochemistry. The structure of biochemicals, their reactions and the mechanisms of those reactions will be related to reactions of simpler organic compounds. The mechanism of action of toxic and therapeutic organic and biochemical compounds will be related to the field of Green Chemistry. Curriculum ideas for incorporating materials into the classroom will be discussed. Review and research articles from literature will be used extensively. Not open to students who have received credit for CHE 720 or CHE 740.
    Prerequisites:
    Undergraduate Inorganic and Organic Chemistry.
  
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    CHE 733 - Physics in Chemistry

    3 Credit(s) This course will examine topics from thermodynamics, kinetics, and quantum chemistry. The topics will be selected from the current state frameworks for teaching high school chemistry and physics and focus on topics where the two disciplines overlap. In addition to studying various topics, demonstrations, laboratories, and lesson plans will be developed. Not open to students who have received credit for CHE 731.
    Prerequisites:
    Physics I & II, General Chemistry I & II, or equivalent
  
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    CHE 755 - Analytical Chemistry in the Middle/High School Laboratory (pre-practicum)

    4 Credit(s) This course will involve a study of quantitative and qualitative chemical analysis and the application of these techniques for the middle/high school laboratory. Laboratory techniques, safety, equipment, and reporting will be discussed. Students will be expected to develop and present laboratories based on specific learning standards. 25 pre-practicum hours. Lecture and laboratory. Not open to students who have received credit for CHE750.   
    Prerequisites:
    Two semesters of general chemistry and lab, or the equivalent 
  
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    CHE 900 - Seminar

    1 Credit(s) This course will require oral and written reports by the participants on current or recent chemical investigations that are published in the chemical literature. Required for the MAT in Chemistry.
    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the MAT Chemistry Program.

  
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    CHE 910 - Research

    3-9 Credit(s) A problem of an advanced nature requiring reading and chemical research in one of the following areas of Chemistry: Analytical, Biological, Inorganic, Organic or Physical. The candidate will select the area of interest, but a staff member of the Chemistry Department will supply the specific problem. A paper is required at the completion of the research. Admission to the course is open to students who have completed the chemistry core requirements in the MAT in Chemistry program and requires the approval of the faculty member under whose direction the research is to be done.
  
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    COM 700 - Introduction to Strategic Communications

    3 Credit(s) This course provides and overview of the best practices and approaches for developing strategic solutions in the context of the communications industry. Students will investigate how organizations develop effective campaigns using data analysis, social media, research, and planning.
  
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    COM 710 - Technology for Communications

    3 Credit(s) This course helps students understand how new technologies impact communications. The three tracks of journalism, advertising and public relations are used to provide context for understanding how and why these technologies are being applied in communications-related fields. Basic computer skills and Internet knowledge required.
  
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    COM 715 - Persuasion, Propaganda and Public Relations

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to introduce students to current theory, research and practice associated with persuasion, public relations and propaganda. A variety of concepts, theories, research and cases will be offered for examination, analysis and comparison.
  
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    COM 716 - Communications in The Global Village

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to prepare students to communicate effectively and ethically across cultural and group boundaries in a media environment defined by digital convergence and global reach. We will explore the history of and theoretical literature about global communications as well as discuss intergroup and intercultural dimensions that can create barriers to effective communication. This class will focus on applications of concepts to professional practice in communications.
  
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    CRH 700 - Introduction to Clinical Research

    3 Credit(s) This course provides an overview of clinical research including the regulatory and ethical framework, the design of clinical trials, and the activities needed for basic clinical studies from beginning to end. Participants will gain a basic understanding of the clinical research process and the class will prepare students for further studies in clinical research. Participants are expected to have studied a biological science at the college level, and have knowledge of basic college mathematics.
  
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    CRH 701 - Regulatory Affairs

    3 Credit(s) The course covers international guidelines, U.S., Canadian and European requirements and national laws. The course outlines the procedures for submitting a proposed study to the ethics committee/regulatory authority and their approval processes in selected countries. The course also focuses on essential documents in clinical research, such as the protocol and the patient informed consent.
  
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    CRH 702 - Drug Development

    3 Credit(s) The course describes the discovery and selection of compounds for human diseases and the paradigm shift from random search to a rational approach. The requirements of preclinical development, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, drug interactions, bioequivalence as well as the phases of clinical development from Phase I - IV will be discussed.
  
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    CRH 703 - Clinical Data Management

    3 Credit(s) The course covers key elements of data management process, like CRF design, data entry data validation and medical coding including exploration of the regulatory requirements. The course also provides an overview on different technologies used in clinical trials, and enables students to assess criteria for selection based on study requirements.
     

     

  
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    CRH 704 - Clinical Logistics

    3 Credit(s) Students will learn about the global supply chain, the planning, forecasting, organization and distribution of Investigational and Non Investigational Medicinal Products; study documents; medical, diagnostic and technical equipment; as well as and about efficiently managing logistics for laboratory samples and data, always in context of the regulatory framework in which the clinical trial is conducted.
  
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    CRH 705 - Clinical Monitoring/Site Management

    6 Credit(s) The course focuses on the practical work of a Clinical Research Associate (CRA) and will enable students to preform the key tasks essential for the work of a CRA. Furthermore, they will be familiarized with Quality Assurance aspects and GCP compliance regarding drug management and Safety Reporting requirements.
     
  
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    CRH 706 - Biostatistics for Clinical Trials

    3 Credit(s) The course covers key elements of biostatical concepts as applied in clinical research. While the course does not aim to train statisticians, students will be equipped with the ability to reflect clinical research from a statistics point of view and to communicate efficiently with biostatisticians.
  
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    CRH 707 - Conducting Clinical Trials

    3 Credit(s) This course enables students to get insight into the principles of Clinical Research and standard trial documentation procedures.
  
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    CRH 708 - Site Management

    3 Credit(s) This course focuses on the practical work of a Clinical Research Associate (CRA) and will enable students to perform the key tasks essential for the work of a CRA. Furthermore, they will be familiarized with Quality Assurance aspects and GCP compliance regarding drug management and Safety Reporting requirements.
  
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    CRJ 703 - Race, Class and Ethnicity and Criminal Justice

    3 Credit(s) This course examines racial, ethnic and socioeconomic factors and explores the possibility that the criminal justice system may be influenced by such factors. The course concentrates on comparative and historical analyses of the relationship between these factors and the criminal justice system and seeks to identify and critically analyze the work of scholars who have developed theories related to this issue.
  
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    CRJ 704 - Juvenile Delinquency and Justice

    3 Credit(s) This course will focus attention on the origin, evolution and current administration of the juvenile justice system. The major theories of delinquency will be introduced and assessed. In addition, special attention will be devoted to gang violence, drug dealing in schools, and the increasing problems associated with anti-social offenses committed by youths.
  
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    CRJ 705 - Women and Criminal Justice

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the role of women in the criminal justice system, as victims, offenders, inmates and professionals. This course analyzes: (1) variations and patterns in female criminality; (2) the rehabilitation of female offenders; (3) the context and meaning of female victimization; and (4) gender and criminal justice professions. In addition, special attention is devoted to criminal justice theories and their relevance to women.
  
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    CRJ 706 - White Collar Crime

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the nature, causes and costs of white collar and corporate crime. A study of corporate crime and criminals is pursued examining the similarities to and differences from other offenders. The major theoretical explanations of white collar and corporate crime are presented. Special attention is given to the impact of social, economic and political forces on the control of white collar and corporate crime.
  
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    CRJ 707 - Intimate Violence

    3 Credit(s) This course will examine violence among intimates, including partner abuse, marital rape, child abuse, child neglect and elder abuse. The major foci will be on domestic violence and child abuse. This course will highlight theories of intimate violence, such as intergenerational transmission and social exchange.
  
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    CRJ 708 - Victimology

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the role of victims in the criminal justice process. A study of the theories of victimization and the nature and extent of victimization is pursued. Special attention is devoted to the treatment of victims by the criminal justice system, the emergence of the victim rights movement and victim services.
  
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    CRJ 709 - Prisons and Jails

    3 Credit(s) A study of current policies and issues that affect modern confinement practices at the federal, state and local levels in the U.S. The emphasis is on rationale, classification, control, programs, treatment, supervision and outcomes. Analysis and examination of the effects of various confinement environments on federal and state prisoners are examined from sociological and psychological perspectives.
  
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    CRJ 710 - Community Corrections

    3 Credit(s) This course analyzes the movement with corrections to provide offenders with rehabilitative and reintegrative services outside of the traditional institutional settings. The historical, theoretical and philosophical rationale for the community-based approach will be critically examined, as well as a wide variety of functioning programs. Attention will also focus on how this movement has addressed special needs offenders, including juveniles, women, substance abusers and the mentally ill.
  
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    CRJ 711 - Police Policy and Practice

    3 Credit(s) Initially, this course will review the historical developments of police policy and police practice. It will examine the changes associated with policy and practice over the past several decades and will focus on how well those practices have serviced specific communities across the U.S. This evaluation will include ideological paradigm shifts between stated mandates versus actual experiences of various communities and specific groups.
  
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    CRJ 712 - Criminal Profiling of Violent Offenders

    3 Credit(s) This course will review the history of criminal profiling as well as the current strategies utilized in criminal profiling. Research on reliability, validity and ethical issues of profiling will be reviewed. There also will be an emphasis on application of currently utilized models in developing profiles through analysis of case studies. The course will extensively cover the three main areas of profiling: forensic analysis, victimology, and crime scene characteristics. Admininistration Concentration Elective.
  
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    CRJ 713 - Drugs and Crime

    3 Credit(s) This course reviews issues in alcohol misuse, licit and illicit drug use, and the criminal justice system. Topics range from contemporary drug issues, to the history of drug use as well as policy approaches. Students will assess the role of drugs in American society, the psychological and physiological effects of abuse, past and current drug control policies, and effective drug treatments. Administration and Criminology Concentration Elective.
  
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    CRJ 714 - Topics in Criminal Justice

    3 Credit(s) This course is an examination of specialized topics in Criminal Justice. The emphasis is on current issues and research and will include advanced readings and research. Topics may include: terrorism, comparative policing, gangs, sex offenders, globalization and crime, technology and crime, security administrations, homeland security and crime mapping. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 courses. Multiple enrollments in a given semester permitted. Three lecture hours per week. Elective
 

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