Apr 17, 2024  
2020-2021 School of Graduate Studies Catalog 
    
2020-2021 School of Graduate Studies Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Graduate Courses


 
  
  • PSY 910 - Practicum in Applied Behavior Analysis

    3 Credit(s) Students are expected to develop ABA skills and knowledge in a 300 hour minimum practicum in a program-approved setting. Students are expected to develop ABA skills and knowledge in a 300 hour minimum practicum in a program approved setting. Students work or volunteer, and attend weekly group supervision meetings. Onsite experience may include observing and relating experiences with ABA methods, recording data or assisting with tasks on-site, and completion of a final paper related to the development of a topic for eventual master’s project. Students must submit weekly evidence of approved supervision hours to both supervisors. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisite:  Completion of PSY 715 , PSY 825 , three additional credits in relevant graduate-level coursework in the MS behavior analysis program, and permission of the Behavioral Analysis graduate program coordinator.

     

  
  • PSY 911 - Internship in Applied Behavioral Analysis I

    3 Credit(s) Students are expected to develop ABA skills and knowledge in a 300 hour minimum internship in a program-approved setting. Students work or volunteer, and attend weekly group supervision meetings. Experiences may include developing more independent tasks related to ABA methods, collaborating with assigned on-site employees and supervisors, accurate recording and analysis of data, and completing internship course assignments. A final paper addressing eventual master’s project protocol and methodology sections is required, and weekly evidence of approved supervision hours to both supervisors. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisite:  Completion of PSY 910  
  
  • PSY 912 - Internship in Applied Behavioral Analysis II

    3 Credit(s) Students are expected to develop ABA skills and knowledge in a 300 hour minimum internship in a program-approved setting. Students work or volunteer, and attend weekly group supervision meetings. Experiences may include developing more independent tasks related to ABA methods, collaborating with assigned on-site employees and supervisors, accurate recording and analysis of data, and completing internship course assignments. A final proposal paper is required for subsequent master’s project will be completed. Students must also submit weekly evidence of approved supervision hours to both supervisors. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisite:  Completion of PSY 911  .
  
  • PSY 925A - Counseling Practicum

    1.5 Credit(s) The Counseling Practicum provides for development of basic counseling skills via direct service interventions with clients in a clinical setting, approved by the Practicum/Internship Coordinator with concert with weekly class of PSY 925B . This course requires a minimum of 100 clock hours of supervised experiences to include a minimum of 40 hours of direct service work with clientele, 15 hours of individual supervision by an on-site clinical supervisor and 25 hours of group supervision from on-campus faculty supervisor.
    Restricted Admission. Permission of the M.S. Counseling Program Coordinator required.
    Pre-requisites:  PSY 731 , PSY 732 , PSY 734N , PSY 739 , PSY 740 ; and PSY 777R .
    Co-requisite: PSY 925B  
  
  • PSY 925B - Practicum Seminar

    2.5 Credit(s) This weekly Practicum Seminar will explore the theory and practice of counseling as it relates to students experiences in their clinical setting, in concert with PSY 925A . Students will reflect on their own developmental progress and process as professional counselors-in-training. Throughout this seminar, multidimensional program of integrate services. The general practice of counseling may include assessment, diagnosis and treatment, counseling and psychotherapy, of a nonmedical nature of mental and emotional disorders, psychoeducational techniques aimed at prevention of such disorders, and consultation to individuals, couples families, group, organizations, and communities.
    Restricted Admission. Permission of the M.S. Counseling Program Coordinator required.
    Pre-requisites: PSY 731 , PSY 732 , PSY 734N , PSY 739 , PSY 740 ; and PSY 777R  
    Co-requisite: PSY 925A  
  
  • PSY 930N - Practicum

    4 Credit(s) This full semester course will provide for the development of basic counseling skills by combining weekly class sessions with direct work with clients in a clinical setting. The course requires a minimum of 100 clock hours of supervised experiences to include a minimum of 40 hours of direct service work with clientele, 10 hours of individual supervision by an on-site supervisor and 15 hours of group supervision. Selected practicum sites must be approved in writing by the Program Coordinator, who at the student’s initiative, meets with the student several times during the semester preceding the practicum assignment.
  
  • PSY 931R - Internship

    4 Credit(s) This course will build upon the skills learned in the practicum and provide for the development of advanced counseling skills by combining in class academic work with direct work with clients in a clinical setting. The course requires weekly class sessions, a minimum of 600 clock hours of supervised experience to include a minimum of 240 hours of direct service with clientele, 15 hours of individual supervision by an on site supervisor and 30 hours of group supervision. Internship hours in excess of 600 must conform to 1 hour of individual supervision for every 16 hours of client contact.
    Pre-requisites: 42 semester hours of program courses including PSY 930N . Selected internship sites must be approved in writing by the Program Coordinator who, at the initiative of the student, meets with the student several times during the semester preceding the internship assignment.
  
  • PSY 940 - Internship in Industrial/Organizational Psychology

    3 Credit(s) Students in this course will apply skills from coursework during a 300-hour internship in a work setting, and will attend a weekly group meeting. The internship will focus on issues in Human Resources or Organizational Development. Students must meet with program coordinator at least one semester ahead to set up the internship. Permission from the Program Coordinator necessary for enrollment.
    Pre-requisites: PSY 785 ,  , MGT 780 , BUS 850  and at least one course in one of the specialty areas of Human Resources or Organizational Development.
  
  • PSY 945A - Counseling Internship I

    1.5 Credit(s) The Counseling Internship I provides for development of advanced counseling skills via direct service interventions with clients in a clinical setting, approved by the Practicum/Internship Coordinator in concert with weekly class  of PSY 945B . This course requires a minimum of 300 clock hours of supervised experiences to include a minimum of 120 hours of direct service work with clientele, 15 hours of individual supervision by an on-site clinical supervisor and 25 hours minimum of group supervision from on-campus faculty supervisor (minimal total or 40 hours of combined individual and group supervision).
    Restricted Admission. Permission of the M.S. Counseling Program Coordinator is required.
    Pre-requisites: PSY 925A  and PSY 925B 
    Co-requisite: PSY 945B  
  
  • PSY 945B - Internship I Seminar

    2.5 Credit(s) This weekly Internship I Seminar will explore the theory and practice of counseling as it relate to students’ experiences in their clinical setting, in concert with PSY 945A . This seminar represents second level of ongoing field-based counseling training completed after Practicum. Students will reflect on their own developmental progress and process as professional counselors-in-training. Throughout this seminar, students will discuss clinical experiences and integrate their formal counseling profession preparation into a multidimensional program or integral services. The general practice of counseling may include assessment, diagnosis and treatment, counseling and psychotherapy, of a nonmedical nature of mental and emotional disorders, psychoeducational techniques aimed at prevention of such disorders, and consultation to individuals, couples, families, groups, organizations, and communities.
    Restricted Admission. Permission of the M.S. Counseling Program Coordinator required.
    Pre-requisite:  PSY 925A  and PSY 925B 
    Co-requisite: PSY 945A  
  
  • PSY 946A - Counseling Internship II

    1.5 Credit(s) The Counseling Internship II provides for continued development of advanced counseling skills via direct service interventions with clients in a clinical setting approved by the Practicum/Internship Coordinator in concert with weekly class of PSY 946B . This course requires a minimum of 300 clock hours of supervised experiences to include a minimum of 120 hours of direct service work with clientele, 15 hours of individual supervision by an on-site clinical supervisor and 25 hours minimum of group supervision from on-campus faculty supervisor (minimal total of 40 hours of combined individual and group supervision.) Internship hours in excess of 600 must conform to one (1) hour of individual supervision for every 16 hours of client contact.
    Restricted Admission. Permission of the M.S. Counseling Program Coordinator is required.
    Pre-requisites: PSY 945A  and PSY 945B  
    Co-requisite: PSY 946B  
  
  • PSY 946B - Internship II Seminar

    2.5 Credit(s) This weekly Internship II Seminar will explore the theory and practice of counseling as it relates to students’ experiences in their clinical setting, in concert with PSY 946A . This seminar represents third level of ongoing field-based counseling training completed after Internship I Seminar. Students will reflect on their own developmental progress and process as professional counselor-in-training. Throughout this seminar, students will discuss clinical experience and integrate their formal counseling profession preparation into a multidimensional program of integral services. The general practice of counseling, may include assessment, diagnosis and treatment, counseling and psychotherapy, of a nonmedical nature of mental and emotional disorders, psychoeducational techniques aimed at prevention of such disorders, and consultation to individuals, couples, families, groups, organizations and communities.
    Restricted Admission. Permission of the M.S. Counseling Program Coordinator required.
    Pre-requisites: PSY 945A  and PSY 945B 
    Co-requisite: PSY 946A  
  
  • PSY 990 - Special Topics in Psychology

    3 Credit(s) These courses provide intensive instruction on special topics in Psychology. The specific content of the courses will be designed by the instructor(s). Instruction may take the form of seminars, conferences, or institutes; courses may occur at Salem State University or at a community location.
  
  • PSY 992 - Special Topics in Psychology

    3 Credit(s) These courses provide intensive instruction on special topics in Psychology. The specific content of the courses will be designed by the instructor(s). Instruction may take the form of seminars, conferences, or institutes; courses may occur at Salem State University or at a community location.
  
  • PSY 993 - Special Topics in Industrial Organizational Psychology

    3 Credit(s) This course provides intensive instruction on special topics in Industrial Organizational Psychology. The specific content of the course will be designed by the instructor(s). Instruction may take the form of lectures, seminars, conferences, or institutes. This course may be taken up to three times for credit, provided that the special topic is different each time, and this course may be taken for multiple credit within a term. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • PSY 997 - Special Topics in Behavior Analysis

    3 Credit(s) This course provides intensive instruction on special topics in Behavior Analysis. The specific content of the course will be designed by the instructor(s). Instruction may take the form of seminars, conferences, or institutes; and courses may occur at Salem State University or at a community location. This course may be taken up to three-times for credit, provided that the special topic is different each time, and this course may be taken for multiple credit within a term. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • PSY 999 - Psychology Masters Thesis II

    3 Credit(s) The thesis requires empirical research on a significant psychological question related to the student’s program of study. The thesis is carried out under the supervision of a faculty member and thesis committee.
    Pre-requisites: Final year of master’s program, minimum 3.5 GPA in courses or invitation by a faculty sponsor, and approval in writing by both the Faculty sponsor and the program coordinator. For MS in Behavior Analysis students, a passing grade in  .
  
  • SMS 701 - Visioning & Strategic Planning

    3 Credit(s) This class focuses on the theory and practice of strategic planning and strategic management in education, and public sector and non-profit agencies. Various approaches to strategic planning as well as specific techniques and tools for conducting environmental scans and issue identification and analyses, strategy development and implementation will be discussed.
  
  • SMS 705 - Exploration of Unique Lifelong Fitness and Sport Practices

    3 Credit(s) This course explores culturally unique fitness and sport practices. Participants are invited to experiment with given innovative methods and search for new techniques and systems of physical activity. Emphasis is placed on researching, experiencing, analyzing and comparing alternative methods of training and restoration not well known across the world, including guidelines for lifelong fitness and long term sport participation used in various countries. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • SMS 706 - Sport Development: Mass Participation and High Performance

    3 Credit(s) This course examines how US and international sport managers, coaches and policy makers connect physical education and recreation programs with competitive sport to offer everyone healthy paths to sport excellence. Discussed are ways to organize and finance partnerships between mass and elite sport as well as develop facilities, competitions, personnel and participants of all levels.
  
  • SMS 707 - Facility and Event Managment in Sport Industries

    3 Credit(s) This course provides an understanding of the facility and event management principles and practices as integrated parts of the business development and management process used by the sport, fitness and leisure organizations. Areas of focus include facility design, funding, financial impact, trends, risk management, crowd management, and event planning, staffing, and organization. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • SMS 708 - Financial Aspects of Sport Industries

    3 Credit(s) This course provides an overview of financial function as a key part of business strategy formulation, planning and implementation used by the sport, fitness and leisure organizations. Particular attention is given to economic theory and perspectives related to the sport industries; economic impact of events and venues; income sources; budgeting principles; and fiscal control. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • SMS 709 - Marketing and Public Relations in Sport Industries

    3 Credit(s) This course presents a conceptual framework for strategic management of various aspects of marketing and public relations within sport industries. Explored will be the processes of researching, analyzing and segmenting markets as well as developing, positioning, pricing, placing, and promoting sport products and services, particularly though sponsorships integrated with other forms of communication. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • SMS 710 - Strength & Conditioning Adaptations & Applications

    3 Credit(s) This course focuses on the development of appropriate strength and anaerobic conditioning programs for optimizing sport performance, individualized strength programs and the physiological responses of the body to those programs. The principles and guidelines for appropriate and safe testing techniques in professional settings will be addressed as well as how to design specific training programs.
  
  • SMS 711 - Advanced Exercise Physiology

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to build on knowledge of the acute and chronic effects of exercise on the human condition. The emphasis will be on the cardiovascular and metabolic effects of human movement under normal and stressful conditions. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • SMS 712 - Nutrition Metabolism for Physical Performance

    3 Credit(s) This course enables the graduate student to further his or her understanding of the dynamic relationship between nutrition and the human body. This course prepares the graduate student to engage in preventive and dietary management techniques as related to nutritional requirements and athletic and physical performance. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • SMS 713 - Advanced Analysis of Human Movement

    3 Credit(s) Advanced study of the mechanical, neuromuscular, and anatomical bases of human movement. Focus is on quantitative kinematic and kinetic analysis with an emphasis on the application to numerous sport activities, gait, jumping and occupational lifting activities.
  
  • SMS 720 - Special Topics in Adventure Education

    2-4 Credit(s) Through a partnership with Project Adventure, a leading provider of professional training in adventure education, students will participate in a multi-day workshop, develop an application project and complete other independent learning experiences to develop or enhance teaching, technical, and facilitation skills associated with adventure education. Repeatable for up to 12 credits.
  
  • SMS 730 - Fitness Concepts

    1 Credit(s) Through discussion and experiences, students will discuss and perform fitness tests and activities. The components of health related fitness are integrated throughout the course. Designing a personal fitness plan, creating fitness activities for the school aged children, and administering and participating in fitness tests are included in this course.
  
  • SMS 731 - Educational Gymnastics, Dance and Rhythmic Activities

    2 Credit(s) Students will explore Laban’s Movement Framework as the foundation for planning movement experiences for children. This course includes an introduction to movement experiences, educational dance, basic gymnastics, and rhythmic activities. In addition to participating in practice sessions, students will choreograph and lead movement sequences.
  
  • SMS 732 - Tactical Games Approach to Teaching in Physical Education

    3 Credit(s) This course is an introduction to tactical complexity of games (net, invasion, striking, fielding, and games.) Extending, refining, and application tasks will be introduced, using the four stages of skill development in games. Student will independently study the tactical games model. The application portion includes effective decision making during game play, participating in small-sided games in class, and practice teaching episodes.
  
  • SMS 780 - Methods of Teaching Elementary Physical Education

    3 Credit(s) This course is the first of two designed to provide students with the training to be a teacher of physical education at the elementary school level. It will offer a general study of the background and philosophies of teaching physical education, with a focus on methods and materials in the classroom, curricular issues and professional concerns, analysis of the teaching/learning processes, and a study of relevant national standards and the Massachusetts state standards for physical education. The course represents a continuation of students’ growth in attaining the Professional Standards for Teaching (PSTs), revisiting many of them at the practice level before demonstrating them in the practicum semester. Three lecture hours per week. Field placement and field-based assignments required.  
    Pre-requisite: Permission of the department chairperson and acceptance into licensure program.

     

  
  • SMS 781 - Methods of Teaching Secondary Physical Education

    3 Credit(s) This course is the second of two designed to provide students with the training to be a teacher of Secondary Physical Education at the middle or high school level. It will offer a general study of the background and philosophies of teaching Secondary Physical Education, with a focus on methods and materials in the classroom, curricular issues and professional concerns, analysis of the teaching/learning processes, and a study of relevant national standards and the Massachusetts state standards for Physical Education. The course represents a continuation of students’ growth in attaining the Professional Standards for Teaching (PST’s), revisiting many of them at the practice level before demonstrating them in the practicum semester. Three lecture hours per week. Field placement and field based assignments are required.
    Pre-requisite: Permission of the department chairperson and acceptance into licensure program.

     

     

  
  • SMS 801 - Current Issues in Physical Education

    3 Credit(s) This course provides an overview of areas of current concern to teachers and administrators involved in physical education. Issues addressed will include: philosophy of physical education, physical activity, gender, students with disabilities, ethical considerations, classroom management, student assessment, technology, curriculum trends, negligence and liability, the image of physical education.
     
  
  • SMS 802A - Leadership for Organizational Wellness

    3 Credit(s) A comprehensive analysis of organizations will focus on the leadership and advocacy of physical education in educational institutions and other sport and movement related settings. Topics such as educational leadership, cultural competence, public relations, evaluation of programs and staff, functions, roles, decision making and grant writing will be included and considered in the context of wellness concepts.
  
  • SMS 803 - Trends and Issues in Health

    3 Credit(s) This course provides an overview of areas of concern to teachers and administrators involved in the field of health/family and consumer science. Issues addressed will include: holistic health and disease prevention, stress management, physical fitness, nutrition and weight management, substance abuse, human sexuality, control/prevention of sexually transmitted infections, family violence and child abuse, environmental health, complimentary and alternative medicine, the use of technology.
  
  • SMS 804 - Legal Issues in Sport Movement Science

    3 Credit(s) Through lecture and discussions this course will familiarize the student with legal terminology, laws, regulations and current legal issues dealing with sport, physical education and leisure. The issues covered will include: legal liability, negligence, risk management, contracts, equipment, facilities and product liability, warning and waivers, Title IX and review of current court cases.
  
  • SMS 805 - Curriculum & Instructional Design in Health and Physical Education

    3 Credit(s) This course will examine how to design effective and meaningful curricula in health and physical education. More specifically, students will develop skills needed to design curricula that are personalized and responsive to the contemporary needs of today’s students. A study of current educational trends, curriculum issues, and curriculum models will be completed as the foundation of design. Goal analysis, selection of content, effective pedagogy, and evaluation procedures will also be highlighted.
  
  • SMS 806 - Mechanisms of Motor Skill Acquisition

    3 Credit(s) A study of theories and mechanisms involved in human movement. Focus is on analysis of principles and systems of gross motor control and learning.
  
  • SMS 807 - Assessment of Student Learning in Physical Education

    3 Credit(s) The focus of this course is on assessment of student learning and performance in physical education. Using established physical education assessments instruments and standards-based grading will be discussed and implemented. Additionally, this course includes the design, critique, and alignment of assessment instruments to the national physical education standards and grade level outcomes. This course meets for three lecture hours per week.
  
  • SMS 815 - Teaching Adapted Physical Education I

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to give students the opportunity to develop a foundation in disabilities and adaptations appropriate for physical education settings. Students will extend their knowledge of legislation and the Individual Education Plan (IEP). Course includes principles and practices of inclusion, the use of case studies and the impact of Mass Education Reform and trans-disciplinary teams will be covered. This course meets for three lecture hours per week.
  
  • SMS 816 - Teaching Adapted Physical Education II

    3 Credit(s) Through lecture, discussion, and application this course examines theory, principles, and methods of delivering appropriate and effective physical education programs to students with disabilities. This course includes the development of an adapted physical education manual incuding adaptive games and game modifications, adaptive techniques, behavior management techniques, skill deelopment, and curriculum variations. This course meets for three lecture hours per week. Prior to enrolling in this course, the following pre-requisite must be completed.
    Pre-requisite: SMS 815   
  
  • SMS 875 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a member of the Sport & Movement Science department. Fullfills the culminating experience requirement for the Leadership in Physical Education & Movement Studies degree program.
  
  • SMS 876 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a member of the Sport & Movement Science department. Fullfills the culminating experience requirement for the Leadership in Physical Education & Movement Studies degree program.
  
  • SMS 965 - Action Research in Physical Education

    3 Credit(s) A 200 hour supervised clinical capstone experience in an elementary or secondary physical education setting in which students will conduct independent action research on a substantive topic relative to curricular issues.
  
  • SMS 967A - Clinical Experience and Seminar in Elementary Physical Education

    6 Credit(s) A full-time 400 hour teaching experience with weekly seminar on topics related to effective teaching in Physical Education. Seminar topics include teacher-student and collegial relations; creating democratic classrooms; understanding peer-culture; critical thinking; expanding the curriculum canon; teaming and clustering; equitable teaching; and reaching special needs and bilingual students. Throughout the full-time clinical experience, students will be attending weekly problem-solving sessions with their mentor teachers and their clinical professors. Session topics will review and expand upon previous course work in the light of current experiences. New topics will be added to the agenda of the course as they arise from students’ and practitioners’ concerns. Sessions will be conducted as problem-solving seminars.
  
  • SMS 967B - Clinical Experience and Seminar in Secondary Physical Education

    6 Credit(s) A full-time 400 hour teaching experience with weekly seminar on topics related to effective teaching in Physical Education. Seminar topics include teacher-student and collegial relations; creating democratic classrooms; understanding peer-culture; critical thinking; expanding the curriculum canon; teaming and clustering; equitable teaching; and reaching special needs and bilingual students. Throughout the full-time clinical experience, students will be attending weekly problem-solving sessions with their mentor teachers and their clinical professors. Session topics will review and expand upon previous course work in the light of current experiences. New topics will be added to the agenda of the course as they arise from students’ and practitioners’ concerns. Sessions will be conducted as problem-solving seminars.
  
  • SOC 715 - Sociology of the American Family

    3 Credit(s) The course includes the analysis of the American family as a social institution and the implications of the kinship system; the intrasocietal comparisons, goals of society with the goals of family and as responsive to the social and cultural milieu in which it operates.
  
  • SOC 875 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a member of the Sociology/Political Science faculty.
  
  • SOC 876 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a member of the Sociology/Political Science faculty.
  
  • SPC 705 - Interpersonal Communication

    3 Credit(s) This course will engage students with ongoing scholarly dialogue about interpersonal communication at an advanced level. Approaching the nexus of theory, research, and praxis in interpersonal communication, students in this course will come to understand interpersonal communication from a variety of research and philosophical perspectives, and to engage in productive conversations about human interaction. Through dialogue, presentations, and projects, students will work toward a richer understanding of the complex field of interpersonal communication.
  
  • SPC 875 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a member of the Theatre and Speech Communication Faculty.
  
  • SPC 876 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a member of the Theatre and Speech Communication Faculty.
  
  • SPN 700 - Advanced Spanish Grammar and Textual Analysis

    3 Credit(s) An intensive review of Spanish grammar and orthographical patterns will be undertaken. Students analyze selections from texts by major Spanish and Latin American authors through oral discussions and presentations, and written assignments. This course cannot be used toward the MAT in Spanish degree.
  
  • SPN 705 - Seminar in Latin American and US Latino Literatures

    3 Credit(s) A study of Latin American and US Latino literatures through representative works by key literary figures from the pre-Colombian period to the present. Chosen texts exemplify the epistolary genre, the novel, the short story, drama, poetry, and the testimonio, and represent the most important literary movements and/or currents in the region. This writing intensive seminar attempts to place texts within a historical and theoretical perspective. Conducted in Spanish.
    Pre-requisite: Upper intermediate-level proficiency in Spanish.
  
  • SPN 706 - Seminar in Peninsular Spanish Literature

    3 Credit(s) A study of Peninsular Spanish literature as an interplay between artistic expression and underlying schemes of values. Each work is examined to reveal essential aspects of a value system (faith, reason, passion, society, art, etc.) and their effect on literary expression. The readings exemplify various genres (poetry, essay, novel, drama, short story) and are representative of major periods from the medieval to the contemporary. Conducted in Spanish.
    Pre-requisite: Upper intermediate-level proficiency in Spanish.
  
  • SPN 710 - Seminar in the Cultures of Spain

    3 Credit(s) This course will examine Spain’s multicultural society from the prehistoric era to the post-Franco years. Authentic literary, historical, artistic and anthropological documents and audio-visual materials will guide students towards an awareness of Spain’s past and present. The idea is to study recurrent themes in Spanish history and culture such as religion and class, regionalism, dictatorship and democracy, and the questioning and creation of a national identity. Conducted in Spanish.
    Pre-requisite: Upper intermediate-level proficiency in Spanish.
  
  • SPN 711 - Seminar in Latin American and US Latino Cultures

    3 Credit(s) Interdisciplinary and in-depth study of the socioeconomic, political and cultural formation we call Latin America including the US Latino communities. Using scholarly texts, interpretive essays, primary sources, and a variety of cultural artifacts (films, music, art objects, literary texts) we will explore the region’s common cultural heritage against its striking cultural contrasts and internal tensions. Conducted in Spanish.
    Pre-requisite: Upper intermediate-level proficiency in Spanish.
  
  • SPN 740 - Contemporary Spanish Women Authors

    3 Credit(s) This course will study Spanish Literature by women authors from the Civil War (1936-39) to the present. Selected works from the vast panorama of women writers of Spain will be analyzed. Though all genres will be included, special emphasis will be given to Prose Fiction because it is the genre that has received more attention from readers and scholars. The works will be approached within their literary context and their cultural context. The idea is to explore the space of female discourse in Spain’s social, historical and literary reality of the recent past. Conducted in Spanish.
    Pre-requisite: Upper intermediate level of Spanish.
  
  • SPN 745 - Spanish Literature: “Fin De Siglo”

    3 Credit(s) An intensive introduction to the “fin de siglo” literary movements of Spain’s late 19th and early 20th centuries with particular emphasis on “modernismo” and the “generacion del 98.” The sense of rupture and repetition, order and chaos present in Spain at the turn of the century will inform class readings. Special attention will be given to the definition of genre and the development of critical vocabulary and techniques.
    Pre-requisite: Intermediate knowledge of Spanish is required.
  
  • SPN 750 - Introduction to Spanish Linguistics and Sociolinguistics

    3 Credit(s) A linguistic and sociolinguistic introduction to Spanish for Spanish and bilingual teachers. The course examines several areas of the linguistic structure of Spanish, in particular the sound system and the vocabulary, as well as language variation in context and communication norms. The course reviews the history of the language and its different modern-day dialects and varieties. Finally, it looks at Spanish in its societal and political context, particularly as it applies to Hispanics in the US. In English and Spanish. Uses a newsgroup as online enhancement to classroom discussion.
    Pre-requisite: Immediate to advanced knowledge of Spanish is required.
  
  • SPN 751 - Methods, Techniques and Strategies for Teaching Spanish (P-6)

    3 Credit(s) The class will survey the history and theory of foreign language teaching at the elementary level. A thorough review of National Standards, the Massachusetts Frameworks and ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines will be conducted. Topics researched and practiced include teaching resources, curriculum development, unit planning, classroom management, testing and assessment, and the use of technology in teaching Spanish at the elementary level. The course includes a 45 hours pre-practicum experience at an area elementary school and is conducted in Spanish.
  
  • SPN 752 - Methods, Techniques and Strategies for Teaching Spanish (5-12)

    3 Credit(s) This course will explore methods and strategies of teaching Spanish at the secondary level. Topics examined include trends and issues related to the teaching of Spanish, innovations, teaching resources, curriculum development, unit and lesson planning, classroom practice and management, testing and assessment, and the role of technology in teaching. A thorough review of National Standards, the Massachusetts Frameworks and the ACTFL Proficiency Guidelines will be conducted. The course includes a 45 hours pre-practicum experience at an area middle or secondary school and is conducted in Spanish.
  
  • SPN 761 - Research in Teaching Spanish (Pre K-6)

    3 Credit(s) This course provides students with practical experience in the utilization of various resources to create, organize, and assess Spanish instruction at the Pre-K through sixth grade level. Students will develop an action research project. Designed for those students seeking professional licensure and the graduate degree, MAT in Spanish. Students must have completed the majority of professional level education courses in the program of studies.
    Pre-requisite: Students must have initial licensure in Spanish.
  
  • SPN 762 - Research in Teaching Spanish (5-12)

    3 Credit(s) This course provides students with practical experience in the utilization of various resources to create, organize, and assess Spanish instruction at the fifth through twelfth grade level. Students will develop an action research project. Designed for those students seeking professional licensure and the graduate degrees, MAT in Spanish. Students must have completed the majority of professional level education courses in the program of studies.
    Pre-requisite: Students must have initial licensure in Spanish.
  
  • SPN 816 - Hispano-American Literature I

    3 Credit(s) A systematic study of the important literary movements of Spanish America from its beginnings during colonial days to the end of the 19th century. Special attention is given to the influence of geography, time and place. Discussions, lectures, readings, examinations and term paper in Spanish.
  
  • SPN 900 - Graduate Research Monograph

    3 Credit(s) Students will identify a research topic and develop it under the guidance of the instructor. The topic will be related to the teaching of the Spanish language or to the teaching of some aspect of Spanish-language literature, linguistics or Hispanic cultures. Regular group meetings will provide the student with the guidance and resources to complete the research project, as well as the benefit of peer support. Students will present their research at the Graduate Research Symposium and/or another venue. Students must have completed all other courses in the MAT or M.Ed. in Spanish. The course is conducted and written in Spanish.
    Pre-requisite: Advanced Low ACTFL proficiency level.
  
  • SUD 880 - View from the Balcony: Perspectives on SUD

    3 Credit(s) This course provides an overview of social, cultural, economic, political, theoretical and clinical aspects of substance use disorders in the United States as a basis for additional coursework on clinical intervention approaches with a range of client populations. Three lecture hours per week. Students may apply individual course credit toward a Post-Baccalaureate Certificate and/or a CAGS in substance Use Disorders & Addiction.
    Pre-requisite: Master’s degree or permission of the program coordinator.
  
  • SUD 882 - Better than a Cure: Prevention of Substane Use Disorders and Addictions

    3 Credit(s) Substance misuse is associated with death, overdose, health problems, mental health issues, lost productivity and crime. This course will demonstrate how preventing substance misuse and substance use disorders can greatly reduce the burden of disease and related consequences for individuals, families and communities. Prevention science and clinical practice will intersect as students learn about and engage with prevention based theory, evidence, and intervention. Three lecture hours per week. Students may apply individual course credit toward a Post-Baccalaureate Certificate and/or CAGS in Substance Use Disorders & Addictions.
    Pre-requisite: Master’s degree or permission of the coordinator.
  
  • SUD 885 - You Can’t Fix What You Don’t Understand: The Intervention of Assessment of Substance Use Disorders and Addictions

    3 Credit(s) Clinical practitioners increasingly encounter individuals with unrecognized and untreated substance use disorders and other behavioral health problems. The foci of this course are on the early phase of treatment including intervention and assessment. Students will master evidence and practice based skills for engagement, biopsychosocial assessment, crisis management, acute stabilization and referral using level of care criteria. Three lecture hours per week. Students may apply individual course credit toward a Post-Baccalaureate Certificate and/or CAGS in Substance Use Disorders & Addictions.
    Pre-requisite: Master’s degree or permission of the coordinator.
  
  • SUD 887 - Can We Stop the Revolving Door? Acute Treatment of Substance Use Disorders & Addictions

    3 Credit(s) This course investigates acute care service delivery in the treatment of substance use disorders and addictions. Primarily focused on the experience of withdrawal and craving management, students learn how the therapeutic relationship can establish a holding environment for treatment to occur. Students will also learn how the therapeutic leverage clinical opportunities for recovery and mediate risks. The needs of families at this phase of treatment will also be carefully considered.Three lecture hours per week. Students may apply individual course credit toward a Post-Baccalaureate Certificate and/or CAGS in Substance Use Disorders & Addictions.
    Pre-requisite: Master’s degree or permission of the coordinator.
  
  • SUD 890 - What’s Next? Continuing Care of Substance Use Disorders & Addictions

    3 Credit(s) This course explores the Continuing Care phase of Substance Use Disorder (SUD) and addiction treatment that occurs soon after acute services, a phase that can often be prolonged and challenging for individuals and families. The course will investigate the immediate, next step services (e.g., housing, employment, relationships, legal, etc.) of continuing care for SUD and addictions. Three lecture hours per week. Students may apply individual course credit toward a Post-Baccalaureate Certificate and/or CAGS in Substance Use Disorders & Addictions.
    Pre-requisite:  Master’s degree or permission of the program coordinator.
  
  • SUD 892 - Marathon not a sprint: Long term recovery management of substane use disorders & addictions

    3 Credit(s) Addiction is a chronic brain disease with consequences that remain problematic years after discontinuation of use. Despite this, treatment has focused on acute interventions, generally aired out from the main health are system. This course will explore chronic care models of care that have been successful in treating other chronic conditions. Consideration will be given to the application of integrated and chronic care models to prevent relapse and improve outcomes. Three lecture hours per week. Students ma apply individual course credit toward a Post-Baccalaureate Certificate and/or a CAGS in Substance Use Disorders & Addictions.
    Pre-requisite: Master’s degree or permission of the program coordinator.
  
  • SUD 895 - What about Me? Client Centered Care for Substane Use Disorders and Addictions

    3 Credit(s) Utilizing a client centered framework this course will examine key issues that effect the treatment of people with substance use disorders and addictions. Students will examine client empowerment, professional values and ethics, stigma, client rights, professional boundaries, culturally-competent care, self care, behavior management and safety as these relate to the treatment of people with substance use disorders and addictions. Three lecture hours per week. Students may apply individual course credit toward a Post-Baccalaureate Certificate and/or CAGS in Substance Use Disorders & Addictions.
    Pre-requisite:  Master’s degree or permission of the program coordinator.
  
  • SWK 700 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment

    3 Credit(s) This Human Behavior and Social Environment (HBSE) course provides a theoretical and conceptual foundation for understanding the behavior and development of individuals, families, and small groups. The course aims to expand and deepen student’s knowledge of the complex interplay of biological, psychological, social, cultural, and environmental forces in the development and functioning of micro systems.
    Pre-requisite: Admission to MSW Program

    101682

  
  • SWK 703 - Historical and Contemporary Perspectives on Social Work and Social Welfare Policy

    3 Credit(s) This course will provide a basis for the student’s formulation and analysis of social welfare policy and services, with special emphasis on the differential impacts these policies and services have on vulnerable populations. This course will familiarize the student with key principles of social policy analysis and engage him or her in the processes involved in policy making, implementation, and evaluation. These skills will enable the student to become a knowledgeable critic and formulator of improved social welfare programs at the national level and within the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.
    Pre-requisite:  Admission to MSW program
  
  • SWK 704 - Assessment & Intervention with Individuals, Families & Groups I

    3 Credit(s) This course represents the first of two consecutive “foundation year” practice courses. The course is structured around the phases of the helping process which include: engagement, assessment, contracting, intervention, evaluation and termination. The course begins by delineating the central, unifying theoretical perspectives used to guide social work practice which includes generalist, strengths and ecological perspectives. The course also explores and integrates the values and ethics of the social work profession.
    Pre-requisite or Co-requisite: SWK 700  
  
  • SWK 705 - Assessment & Intervention with Individuals, Families, and Groups Part ll

    3 Credit(s) This practice course represents the second of two “foundation year” practice semesters. This semester has an emphasis on couple, family, and group systems. Knowledge and skills gained from the first of the two sequence course are transferable and integrated into course sessions. Utilizing a variety of theoretical approaches, students will be able to shape assessments and interventions that are client centered. The course concludes by addressing the process of becoming a professional social worker.
    Pre-requisite:   
  
  • SWK 706 - Community Practice and Social Change

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to build on generalist practice themes. It presents an examination and application of the role of the social worker engaged in social change through community organization and planning. The problem-solving model of social work practice is applied to the assessment and intervention challenges on the community level with particular attention to issues of diversity and the realization of client and citizen empowerment. Three lecture hours.
    Pre-requisite: Admission to MSW program
     
  
  • SWK 707 - Evidence-Based Social Work

    3 Credit(s) This course will enable students to engage in the process of evidence-based social work practice. Students will develop basic competencies in the critical consumption of social work-research and evaluation data. Using the professional social work literature, students will explore the nature of evidence-based practice debates in social work practice arenas. Students will how to find, examine and synthesize the professional literature including the interpretation of qualitative and quantitative research findings.
    Pre-requisite or Co-requisite: SWK 700  
  
  • SWK 714 - Introduction to Interprofessional Practice in Health Care Systems

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to introduce students to the principles and strategies of interprofessional practice in contemporary health care systems. The course curricula are designed to advance students’ competent practice in interprofessional health care delivery. The course is open to matriculated graduate students in nursing, occupational therapy, and social work as well as to non-matriculated students who hold a baccalaureate degree in one of these disciplines and whose undergraduate GPA is 3.0 or better.
  
  • SWK 715 - Human Diversity and Social Work Practice

    3 Credit(s) This course examines how diversity characterizes and shapes the human experience, contributes to identity formation, and the extent to which social structures and values may create systems which marginalize and oppress particular groups while enhancing other groups’ privilege and power. Diversity is examined through social construction and intersectionality frameworks that acknowledge the multiple dimensions of diversity related to age, class, color, culture, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation.
    Pre-requisite: Admission to the MSW program
  
  • SWK 717 - Forensic Social Work Advocacy and Case Management

    3 Credit(s) This course introduces the professional arena of forensic social work at the intersection of social work and the legal system in the United States. Students are exposed to innovative practice and advocacy solutions that address the psychosocial determinants of health, well-being and legal/justice involvement. Course participants will increase their knowledge, values, and specific skills for collaborative interdisciplinary work with forensic populations in diverse practice settings, including protective services, the courts, and corrections. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisite:  SWK 700  
  
  • SWK 718 - Social Work Ethics in Theory and Practice

    3 Credit(s) Faced with growing number of ethical challenges, social service agencies, hospitals, nursing homes are increasingly utilizing ethics consultants or establishing internal ethics committees-social workers should be prepared to act as leaders in these endeavors. This course will prepare students to make cogent moral arguments in support of public policies or agency decisions by familiarizing student with the philosophical, theoretical and practical foundations of ethical decision making in social work. Three lecture credit hours.
  
  • SWK 721 - Field Education I and Integrated Seminar I

    3 Credit(s) Foundation year graduate students will integrate theoretical constructs and information gained in the classroom with the experiential learning gained in the field setting. During the field seminar, students enhance their understanding of the generalist approach and develop their social work professional identity. Three credit hours.
    Pre-requisite or Co-requisite:  SWK 704  
  
  • SWK 722 - Field Education II and Integrated Seminar II

    3 Credit(s) Students focus on application and individual action required in their field setting. During the field seminar, students increase their ability to apply critical thinking skills in their analysis of field work. Students are expected to accept more responsibility for their individual learning. Three credit hours.
    Pre-requisite:    
  
  • SWK 724 - Social Work Practice with U.S. Latin@s over the Lifespan

    3 Credit(s) Graduate students will acquire knowledge and culturally sensitive skills for social work practice with the United States Latin@ population over the lifespan. Introduction to the historical, social, and psychological processes that effect Latin@ children, adolescents, adults, and older adults will be presented for discussion, analysis, ad the application of social work practice approaches. Students will apply content, processes, and skills that are integral to social services with Latin@s. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisite: SWK 700  or Instructor permission.
  
  • SWK 735 - Assessment of Psychosocial Pathology

    3 Credit(s) The Assessment of Psychosocial Pathology course focuses on the methods and criteria used in making differential decisions about mental health diagnoses, introducing students to the application of the DSM V. Students will also be introduced to a competency based model of assessment taking into account the social, biological, psychological and strengths of individuals. Ethical issues and limitations related to current diagnostic systems will be discussed. Three lecture hours.
    Pre-requisite or Co-requisite:  SWK 705  or SWK 796  
  
  • SWK 760 - Social Work Practice with Immigrant and Refugee Families: Issues, Challenges, and Resiliency

    3 Credit(s) This course will provide graduate students with knowledge and skills in working with immigrant and refugee individuals, families, groups, and communities in the United States in a variety of human service settings. This course includes an introduction to the historical, social, and psychological processes that impact upon immigrant and refugee children, individuals, and families. The impact of immigration and processes of socialization, acculturation, and assimilation on parenting and children will be explored.
    Pre-requisite:   or by instructor permission
  
  • SWK 796 - Seminar: Human Behavior and the Social Environment

    3 Credit(s) This HBSE/Practice Summer Seminar is designed specifically for Advanced Standing students in order to review and synthesize concepts, theories, and practice methods pertinent to a generalist social work perspective. This course is to be taken in sequence followed by SWK 797 . The seminars incorporate conceptual understanding and practice principles for social work practice with individuals, families, small groups, and communities. The goal is to prepare students for the MSW Program’s Advanced Generalist Concentration Curriculum.
    Pre-requisite: Admission to the MSW Advanced Standing Program
    Co-requisite: SWK 797  
  
  • SWK 797 - Seminar: Social Work Practice

    3 Credit(s) This HBSE/Practice Summer Seminar is designed specifically for Advanced Standing students in order to review and synthesize concepts, theories, and practice methods pertinent to a generalist social work perspective. This course is to be taken following SWK 796 . The seminars incorporate conceptual understanding and practice principles for social work practice with individuals, families, small groups, and communities. The goal is to prepare students for the MSW Program’s Advanced Generalist Concentration Curriculum.
    Pre-requisite or Co-requisite:  SWK 796  
  
  • SWK 798 - Advanced Standing Field Education I and Integrated Seminar I

    3 Credit(s) This course provides the Advanced Standing student an opportunity to integrate classroom learning with experiential component. Seminars meet for 3 hours during alternate weeks of the Summer Sessions. Concomitantly, students are in experienced field learning centers for 16 hours weekly under the supervision of experienced Field Instructors. Seminars provide additional integration of course work and practice experiences and enhance student’s knowledge and skill base through peer challenge, presentation, and sharing experiences.
    Pre-requisite or Co-requisite:   
  
  • SWK 799 - Advanced Standing Field Education II and Integrated Seminar II

    3 Credit(s) This course provides the Advanced Standing student an opportunity to integrate classroom learning with experiential component. Seminars meet for 3 hours during alternate weeks of the Summer Sessions. Concomitantly, students are in experienced field learning centers for 16 hours weekly under the supervision of experienced Field Instructors. Seminars provide additional integration of course work and practice experiences and enhance student’s knowledge and skill base through peer challenge, presentation, and sharing experiences.
    Pre-requisite: SWK 798  

     

  
  • SWK 802 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment: Health & Mental Health

    3 Credit(s) This course promotes a holistic orientation to the assessment and understanding of the complexity of bio-psychosocial human functioning in cultural contexts, and explores the diverse array of possible interventions. The course is designed to enable students to research and critically analyze the existing knowledge base in the health and mental health fields, and to apply their understanding to social work assessment and intervention.
    Pre-requisites: SWK 722  or SWK 797 .
  
  • SWK 804 - Human Behavior Theory in Child and Family Services

    3 Credit(s) Human Behavior Theory in Child and Family Services is designed to deepen and extend students’ knowledge of biological, psychological, relational, cultural, economic and social dynamics that influence individual and family development, and risk and resilience among children and families.
    Pre-requisites: SWK 722  or SWK 797  
  
  • SWK 808 - Human Behavior Theory: Older Adults and End-of-Life Care

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to familiarize students with the biological, social and psychological aspects of the aging process, life threatening illness, death, grief, and bereavement. It seeks to integrate knowledge from various phases of the field of gerontology and end-of-life care in order to create an understanding of the relationship between the internal and external forces experienced in the process of aging and end-of-life over the life cycle and across cultural contexts. 
    Pre-requisite: SWK 722  or SWK 797  
  
  • SWK 810 - Advanced Clinical Assessment and Intervention

    3 Credit(s) Students are expected to develop advanced practice skills for the disciplined use of various paradigms for direct clinical intervention with individuals and families. They are challenged to develop the capacity to appropriately choose and implement the major practice frameworks available to them as they address the needs of vulnerable groups. Students learn to empirically base their practice by evaluating their direct practice activities.
    Pre-requisite: SWK 722  or SWK 797  
  
  • SWK 818A - Integrated Practice and Theory for Adults and Families I

    3 Credit(s) Students will master various conceptual and practice frameworks informing ideas of health and wellness, including selected public health concepts such as the epidemiology, and social determinants of representative physical and mental health conditions. Students will develop and differentially apply advanced practice skills in assessment and intervention with individuals and families based on the conceptual models learned. Students will also learn to assess in an ongoing fashion the effectiveness of their direct practice and adjust interventions accordingly. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisite or Co-requisite: SWK 722  or SWK 797  
  
  • SWK 818B - Integrated Practice and Theory for Adults and Families II

    3 Credit(s) Concepts and skills introduced in SWK 818A  are deepened. Students will demonstrate increasing levels of critical thinking to the subject matter, resulting in an advanced, disciplined use of self, and of the various paradigms available for direct clinical interventions. How policy intersects with and shapes access and  treatment of health conditions is discussed. Students become familiar with inter-professional practice in various healthcare settings, and learn how to maximize working collaboratively in multidisciplinary teams. Three lecture hours per week.

    Pre-requisite: SWK 818A  

  
  • SWK 819A - Integrated Practice and Theory for Children and Families I

    3 Credit(s) This course is the first of a year-long course designed to prepare students for practice with children and families in community-based settings. The course incorporates curricula on child development with practice models for specific developmental periods. The course emphasizes the development and measurement of competencies required in integrated care settings where knowledge, skills, values, and cognitive as well as affective processes specific to addressing the transactional relationship between behavioral and physical health are critical.
    Pre-requisite or Co-requisite:  SWK 722  or SWK 797  
 

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