Apr 17, 2024  
2020-2021 School of Graduate Studies Catalog 
    
2020-2021 School of Graduate Studies Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Graduate Courses


 
  
  • ENG 818 - Poetry Workshop

    3 Credit(s) A writing course for those who wish to concentrate exclusively on poetry. Participants will be expected to write a series of poems, to read widely in contemporary poetry and in poetic theory and to write critical reviews. This course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. Three lecture hours.

     

  
  • ENG 819 - Advanced Creative Writing

    3 Credit(s) Lecture and workshop methods are combined to represent the fine points of writing poetry and fiction. Readings in contemporary fiction and poetry.
  
  • ENG 820 - Workshop in Fiction and Narrative Forms

    3 Credit(s) A workshop course concentrating on the short stories, novels-in-progress, and nonfiction narratives of the participants. Workshop members read and critique one another’s work and discuss works by accomplished authors. Topics include how to publish. This course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits.

     

  
  • ENG 821 - Contemporary Approaches to Teaching Literature

    3 Credit(s) A specialized course for teachers of English but open to everyone. Investigating the research and theories which inform current literature pedagogy. Using historical and theoretical perspectives to develop their own pedagogical framework, students will consider their assumptions, experiences, and strategies for teaching literature, and decide how to adapt current models to their own classroom situations.
  
  • ENG 822A - Nonfiction Workshop

    3 Credit(s) A course in writing nonfiction, ranging from the personal to the objective, from brief journalistic pieces to literary essays. Classes will involve workshop discussions of students’ writing, attention to the details of style, and the study of lessons derived from professional writers. This course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. Three lecture hours.

     

  
  • ENG 823 - Studies in Grammar and Style

    3 Credit(s) A comprehensive foundation in the syntactical structures of English as a basis for an investigation of stylistics. Designed for educators, writers and editors, this course considers such questions as grammatical “correctness” from the perspectives of both sociolinguists and historians of English and extends to considerations of effectiveness, grace, emphasis, and suitability of styles for a range of both subject matter and audiences.
  
  • ENG 825 - Workshop in Memoir and Prose Forms

    3 Credit(s) A writing course for those who wish to concentrate on memoir and related prose forms, including fiction creative nonfiction, and hybrid texts. Workshop members will submit work in progress for in-class criticism and commentary. The coursework will include deriving lessons from exemplary published memoirs and nonfiction. Information on publishing will be given. This course may be repeated up to nine credits.

     

  
  • ENG 829 - Research in the Teaching of English

    3 Credit(s) An introduction to the history, techniques, methodologies, vocabulary, and theoretical assumptions of research and research findings in the teaching of English, specifically literature, composition, and areas of language arts. Students will read and interpret major research studies of others and conduct individual research projects.
  
  • ENG 830 - Digital Writing

    3 Credit(s) This course introduces students to an expanded definition of writing through the study and practice of digital writing. Students will engage with contemporary scholarship (e.g. rhetoric, semiotics, digital humanities) to understand theories and practices of digital writing. They also will consider how the digital world affords writers the genres, strategies, tools, and platforms for composing beyond text and print. For the hands-on experience needed to effectively create digital content, students will analyze and compose digital tasks, such as comics, videos, websites, podcasts, and blogs.
  
  • ENG 831AN - Topics in American Literature and Criticism

    3 Credit(s) An intensive examination of highly specialized topical areas in American literature and criticism. This course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. Three lecture hours.
  
  • ENG 832 - Topics in British Literature and Criticism

    3 Credit(s) This course offers an intensive examination of highly specialized topical areas in British Literature and Criticism. This course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. Three lecture hours.
  
  • ENG 833 - Topics in Writing

    3 Credit(s) This course offers students the opportunity to explore current, relevant subjects and issues in the field of writing. Among the topics that may be offered are Nature Writing, Playwriting, Screenwriting, Sports Writing, and Travel Writing. May be repeated for credit.
  
  • ENG 834 - Special Topics in Writing and Rhetoric

    3 Credit(s) This course offers students the opportunity to explore current scholarly conversations, questions, and issues in the discipline of writing and rhetoric. Topics that may be offered include Rhetoric and Social Action, Leadership in Writing Support Programs, Teaching Diverse Writers, and Visual Rhetoric. The course may be repeated with a different topic, for up to six credits.
  
  • ENG 835 - Mindful Writing: Theory and Practice

    3 Credit(s) This course explores mindfulness as writing theory and practice and examines the impact of present awareness on the writing process and rhetorical situation. It studies rhetorical factors of impermanence, audience, internal rhetoric, verbal emptiness, mindful invention, and the embodied and material conditions of writing. Present-moment awareness is applied to writing to reduce obstacles that come from mindlessness or future-or past-oriented approaches. Students practice mindful writing techniques fro us in the classroom and their writing. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • ENG 839 - Research in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

    3 Credit(s) This course examines current research methods in the field of ESL teaching and students will develop the ability to read and conduct classroom research. Quantitative and qualitative methods, such as ethnography, focus group, case study, and action research will be considered. Teacher research in the ESL classroom will be emphasized. Students will develop a detailed research proposal and conduct a pilot study designed to investigate language acquisition and language teaching.
    Pre-requisite:  /EDS 770N  
  
  • ENG 855 - Creative Writing Theory & Pedagogy

    3 Credit(s) This course introduces students to the major pedagogies in creative writing studies. Students will familiarize themselves with current debates in the field about creativity and the teaching of writing and study the history of creative writing instruction in the United States. Students will explore an array of creative writing pedagogies including but not limited to workshop, process, rhetorical, feminist, critical race, collaborative, Writing-Across-the-Curriculum, digital, holistic, and eco-pedagogy.
  
  • ENG 859 - Teaching Grammar to English Learners

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the theory and practice of grammar instruction in the second language context. Students will apply the study of grammatical forms and structures of English to teaching English in context. Students will develop original lesson plans that incorporate grammar instruction and technology into a standards-based framework. Three lecture hours per week. Field-based assignments are required.

     

  
  • ENG 860 - Sheltering Content for English Language Learners

    3 Credit(s) This course will prepare students with knowledge and skills to more effectively implement sheltered content instruction to English Language Learners. Students will develop strategies and approaches that help ELLs at varying stages of proficiency to acquire English language skills while meeting content-area standards. This course is designed to meet the requirements of the Sheltered English Immersion endorsement course as described by the MA Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. Topics include: second language acquisition, linguistic awareness, sheltered English immersion, the WIDA English language standards and assessment, differentiated instruction, and socio-cultural factors affecting language acquisition. Field-based assignments are required.
  
  • ENG 870 - Writing Center-Graduate Practicum

    3 Credit(s) Required of graduate assistants assigned to the Writing Center, but also open to other graduate students. The course offers training in composition theory, practice in the conference method of teaching writing, and participation in the operations of the Writing Center. Requirements include regular weekly tutoring in the Writing Center and a project on composition theory and practice.
    Pre-requisite: Permission of the Instructor.
  
  • ENG 871 - Workshop in Academic Writing

    3 Credit(s) This course will offer students working on academic writing projects an opportunity to develop, research, and complete them in the context of a supervised peer workshop. The course will review scholarly research and writing techniques, as well as provide intensive instructor and peer review of individual manuscripts.
    Prerequisites:   , 18 credits graduate course work.
  
  • ENG 875 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An independent reading, research, and/or writing project supervised by a member of the English graduate faculty. Can be repeated once for a maximum of six credits. Pre-approval by graduate coordinator and supervising faculty member required before a student enrolls in the course.
  
  • ENG 879 - Internship in Digital Humanities

    1-3 Credit(s) In this 1-3 credit internship, graduate students intern with a faculty member to gain practical experience applying digital humanities theory to practice. Through research, hands-on collaboration, and individual meetings, interns work with the faculty member on a digital humanities project to develop advanced research skills in digital scholarship, apply digital tools to humanities research, and expand project management skills
  
  • ENG 880 - Internship in College Pedagogy

    1-3 Credit(s) In this 1-3 credit internship, graduate students intern with a faculty member to gain practical experience and knowledge in college-level pedagogy. Through reading, research, individual meetings, classroom observation, interns work with the faculty member in syllabus design, research and preparation for lectures, activity design, and classroom management. May be repeated up to three times for up to a total of 3 credits.
    Pre-requisites: ENG 725  and permission of the instructor and the graduate coordinator.
  
  • ENG 895 - Topics in Irish Literature and Culture

    3 Credit(s) An intensive examination of specialized topical areas in Irish literature and culture. Three lecture hours per week. This course may be repeated for a maximum of six credits.
    Prerequisite:  ENG 725  
  
  • ENG 899 - Seminar in Literacy Studies

    3 Credit(s) This is an advanced literature course that follows a student-driven approach to course content and includes student presentations and a significant culminating project. Topics vary according to instructor. Required of all M.A. in English students with literature option.
    Pre-requisites: ENG 725  ; all seminar enrollees must have completed 15 credits in graduate studies toward an English M.A., M.A.T., or M.A./M.A.T. May be repeated once for credit
  
  • ENG 935 - Topics in European Narratives from Modernism to Present

    3 Credit(s) A study of innovative and experimental forms of modernism, postmodernism, and avant-garde literary and visual narratives produced in Europe since the late nineteenth century.This course may be repeated for a maximum of nine credits. Multiple enrollments in a term are allowed.

     

  
  • ENG 950 - Women in Literature and Film

    3 Credit(s) This course emphasizes gender, narrative, and genre in selected literary texts and films by incorporating the theories and methods of feminist scholars.
  
  • ENG 951 - Mystery, Suspense and Science Fiction

    3 Credit(s) Studies in various types of popular fiction, considering the aesthetic and cultural significance of major works directed to a general audience. Emphasis will be on key works of historical importance.
  
  • ENG 965 - MAT English to Speakers of Other Languages Thesis, Part One: Planning and Research

    3 Credit(s) The first half of a two-semester sequence designed for MAT ESOL candidates. Planned with the program coordinator and designated thesis adviser using guidelines and criteria and approved by the Graduate Dean, this course is devoted to proposing, planning, and gathering the data needed to write an original thesis that explores a relevant topic in the field.
    Pre-requisite: ENG 839 ; Permission of the graduate coordinator.
  
  • ENG 966 - MAT English to Speakers of Other Languages Thesis, Part Two: Writing

    3 Credit(s) The second half of a two-semester sequence designed for MAT in ESOL candidates. Planned with the program coordinator and thesis advisor and approved by the Graduate Dean, this course is devoted to applying theory and original research toward writing a substantial thesis that explores a relevant topic in the field.
    Pre-requisite: ENG 965 ; Permission of the graduate coordinator.
  
  • ENG 994 - Portfolio Capstone

    3 or 6 Credit(s) The Portfolio Capstone is a 1-2 semester-long project/course in which students in the M.A. or M.A./M.A.T. English Program with an option in Literature showcase the work that they have produced, engage in substantive revisions, and create two new papers: an introductory narrative and an independent paper. The student works closely with a faculty advisor.
    Pre-requisites: 24 Graduate English Credits,  , matriculation into the M.A. or M.A./M.A.T. English Program. This course is repeatable for a total of six credits.
  
  • ENG 996 - Manuscript Capstone in Writing

    3 or 6 Credit(s) The Manuscript Capstone in Writing is a 1-2 semester-long course in which students in the M.A. or M.A./M.A.T. English Program writing option complete an original work of significant length in a single genre. The student works closely with a faculty advisor.
    Pre-requisites: Matriculation into the M.A./M.A.T.program, 24 credits toward M.A. or M.A./M.A.T. in English degree,

      , approval of graduate coordinator. This course is repeatable for a total of six credits.

     

  
  • ENG 998 - Thesis Capstone

    3 or 6 Credit(s) The Thesis Capstone is a 1-2 semester-long course in which students in the M.A. or M.A./M.A.T. English Program with an option in Literature write a scholarly thesis. The student works closely with a faculty advisor.
    Pre-requisites: matriculation into the M.A. or M.A./M.A.T. program, cumulative G.P.A. of 3.75 or higher, 24 credits toward M.A. or M.A./M.A.T. English degree,  ,  , approval of graduate coordinator. Repeatable once for a total of six credits.
  
  • FIN 720 - Foundations of Finance

    3 Credit(s) This course introduces theory and application of concepts related to corporate financial management decisions. Topics include agency relationship, financial statement analysis, risk-return relationship, time value of money, asset valuation models, capital budgeting techniques, cost of capital, and financial ethics.
    Pre-requisite/Co-requisite: Financial Accounting for Managers (ACC 720 ).
  
  • FIN 751 - Fundamentals of Financial Planning and Insurance

    3 Credit(s) This course introduces students to the financial planning process with an overview of risk management and insurance, income tax planning, investment planning, retirement planning, employee benefits, and estate planning. Students will learn about time value of money, legal/ethical aspects of financial planning. The course also covers details of insurance planning.
  
  • FIN 753 - Retirement and Employee Benefits Planning

    3 Credit(s) This course covers the importance of retirement planning and provides students with knowledge of public plans (Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid etc.) and retirement plans including DB and DC plans and their regulatory provisions. Individual retirement plans like KEOGH, SRA, IRA etc. are also addressed as will other non-qualified DC plans. Other life changing events and their impact on retirement planning will also be discussed.
    Pre-requisite: FIN 751 .
  
  • FIN 757 - Income Tax Planning

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the Federal Income Tax Statutes as they relate to individuals, partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations, estates and trusts. The course examines how individuals can utilize their understanding of these tax statutes so as to minimize tax liabilities.
  
  • FIN 759 - Estate Planning

    3 Credit(s) This course explores the complex legal, tax, and financial issues in transfer of property, wills, trust, gifts, etc. The course introduces students to the areas of wills, probate, marital deductions, charitable contributions, charitable trusts and planning for incapacity. Special attention is given to the use of trusts, insurance, and taxation issues in estate planning, etc. The course provides the students with the basic tools necessary to advise clients in estate planning matters.
    Pre-requisite: FIN 751 .
  
  • FIN 780 - Investment Analysis and Portfolio Management

    3 Credit(s) This course examines key concepts and practices of investments. Included are topics in introduction of security markets; types of investment vehicles such as common and preferred stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and derivatives; investment environment; economy review; industry and security analysis; and portfolio concepts.
    Pre-requisite or Co-requisite:   or   or chairperson’s approval
  
  • FIN 785 - Case Studies in Financial Planning

    3 Credit(s) Students will integrate key financial planning concepts, including investment analysis, retirement and employee benefits planning, insurance and income tax planning and estate planning. The primary pedagogy is through case studies. Students will work individually or in teams to develop solutions to realistic situations described in cases and present their recommendations. Three lecture hours.
    Pre-requisites:   and successful completion of a minimum of four 700 level Finance courses including FIN 751 .
  
  • FIN 800 - Financial Decision Making and Value Creation

    3 Credit(s) This course focuses on the application of financial theories in corporate decision making, building upon and expanding concepts introduced in Foundations of Finance (FIN 720 ). Topics include valuation models with uncertainty, cash flow forecasting, modern portfolio theory, asset pricing models, capital structure, cost of capital, working capital management and introduction to option pricing models. Spreadsheet software and cases will be used.
    Pre-requisites: Matriculation into the MBA program; completion of all foundation courses or permission of Program Coordinator.
  
  • FIN 868 - Advanced Financial Analysis

    3 Credit(s) The course is intended to provide the student with an understanding of the relationship between financial statements produced in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and the informational content that they may or may not provide. The course will enable the student to come away with a better understanding of published financial statements and their usefulness to investors and creditors. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisites: FIN 720  or permission of the program coordinator.
  
  • FLT 700 - Intensive Reading in French

    3 Credit(s) An intensive one-semester course focused on developing proficiency in reading French. Students will learn the fundamentals of French grammar, will learn to recognize basic vocabulary words and cognates, and will develop strategies for reading comprehension. Students will not learn to write, to speak or to understand spoken French. This course is open to graduate students with limited or no prior study of French. Three credit hours.
  
  • FLT 701 - Intensive Reading in Spanish

    3 Credit(s) An intensive one-semester course focused on developing proficiency in reading Spanish. Students will learn the fundamentals of Spanish grammar, will learn to recognize basic vocabulary words and cognates, and will develop strategies for reading comprehension. Students will not be expected to write, to speak or to understand spoken Spanish. This course is open only to graduate students with limited or no prior study of Spanish. Three credit hours.
  
  • FRE 754 - Readings from French-Speaking Africa and the Caribbean

    3 Credit(s) This course will explore the literatures and cultures of French-speaking Africa and the Caribbean. Essays and literary readings serve as topics for class discussion and textual analysis, while providing insight into the Francophone experience in Africa and the Caribbean. Emphasis will be placed on the themes of colonization, oppression, racism, and identity. Conducted entirely in French.
    Prerequisite: Intermediate to advanced proficiency in written and spoken French.
  
  • FRE 762 - Quebec: Culture and Literature

    3 Credit(s) In this course, students will explore the culture and literature of French-speaking Québec. Through essays, literary readings, songs, works of art, and films, students will follow the development of this province of Canada from its origins as a French colony through the exodus of French-Canadians in the early 20th century and the “Révolution Tranquille” of the 1960’s, up to the present day. Conducted entirely in French.
    Pre-requisite: Intermediate to advanced fluency in written and spoken French.
  
  • GLS 750 - Advanced Survey

    3 Credit(s) This course acquaints the student with advanced methods of land survey as they relate to the geo-computing environment. Students learn by conducting field survey using both land and global positioning system.
  
  • GLS 760 - Geologic Hazards of North America

    3 Credit(s) Shake, rattle and roll could summarize the topics covered in this web-enhanced class of which the dynamic and dangerous Earth is the subject. Students learn about earthquakes, volcanic activity, tsunamis, landslides, floods and beach erosion through case studies, web-based homework completed on-line, in-class projects and assessments. Students will produce a web-page illustrating a geologically hazardous area.
    Pre-requisite: GLS100 or permission of the Instructor.
  
  • GLS 761 - Field Experiences in Earth Sciences

    3 Credit(s) The New England area is blessed with opportunities for experiential outdoor learning. We have rivers, beaches and glacial features near to hand, just waiting for exploration. This web-enhanced course takes advantage of our local geology through a combination of web activities, in-class projects and brief lectures. Students will participate on-line through pre-class exercises and in-class activities and assessments. As a group the class will develop a shared portfolio of lesson plans and useful field projects. Teams will give a virtual field trip to the class as a final project. Field Fee may be applied.
    Pre-requisite: GLS100 or permission of the instructor.
  
  • GLS 780 - Applied Environmental Geophysics

    4 Credit(s) This course examines the theory and practice of geophysical methods currently used to help solve environmental problems. Methods include seismic refraction and reflection, gravity, magnetic, electrical resistivity, electromagnetic, ground-penetrating radar, and radioactivity surveys (Radon). A research paper, case analysis, or individual field project, and a brief presentation are also required. Pre-requisites: GLS100 and PHS211 or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
  • GLS 875 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a member of the Geological Science faculty.
  
  • GLS 876 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a member of the Geological Science faculty.
  
  • GNE 701 - Assessment & Grading: Promoting Student Growth

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to enhance the K-12 educator’s knowledge of assessment and grading practices. The following themes will be investigated: formative assessment, summative assessment, learning targets and outcomes, methods of assessing, types of assessment protocols, grading practices, providing feedback and defining mastery. This course prepares teachers by providing them with the essential elements needed to translate assessment of learning to assessment for learning.
  
  • GNE 702 - Creating Educational Websites: Increasing Student Achievement with Professional Web Integration

    3 Credit(s) The purpose of an educator’s Web site is to teach, inform, and communicate. This course provides K-16 teachers with the knowledge and skills to expand classroom technology use by designing and publishing a professional educational Web site. Content will focus on the features of an effective educational Web site, and the use of Web development software tools to design, develop, enhance, and publish the site.
  
  • GNE 703 - Disciplinary Literacy: Meeting the Common Core Literacy Standards in History, Science and Technical Subjects

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to provide K-12 educators an understanding of the ELA Common Core Standards in the disciplines: History/Social Science, Science, and Technical (HST). Participants of this course will learn what the ELA HST standards are, what it means to be “literate” in each of the disciplines, and how to create such literacies. Most significantly, participants will learn teaching strategies to embrace the new HST ELA standards.
  
  • GNE 704 - The English Language Arts (ELA) Common Core: Understanding and Teaching the Big Shifts 6-12

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to provide an understanding of 6-12 Common Core State Standards, including the history of the standards, as well as the biggest shifts from current instructional practice. Most significantly, participants will learn teaching strategies to embrace the new ELA standards, with a particular focus on strengthening classroom practice in the biggest shift areas from old to new standards, and aligning to the tasks of the new assessments.
  
  • GNE 705 - The English Language Arts (ELA) Common Core: Understanding and Teaching the Big Shifts K-5

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to provide an understanding of K-5 Common Core State Standards, including the history of the standards, as well as the biggest shifts from current instructional practice. Most significantly, participants will learn teaching strategies to embrace the new ELA standards, with a particular focus on strengthening classroom practice in the biggest shift areas from old to new standards, and aligning to the tasks of the new assessments.
  
  • GNE 706 - Educating Students with Autism: Evidence-based Best Practice

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to provide K-8 educators, paraprofessionals and/or administrators with a widespread knowledge of Autism Spectrum Disorders. Participants will explore historical data and diagnosis statistics, characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorders and co-morbid diagnoses. Additionally, course content will focus on implementation of classroom strategies to meet the diverse learning needs of students on the Autism Spectrum. Participants will research, analyze and effectively select evidence based strategies appropriate for students with Autism.
  
  • GNE 708 - Monitoring Student Growth: Reading Assessment and Data Interpretation

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to enhance a participant’s knowledge of reading assessment and data interpretation grades K-12. Focus will be on scientifically based research and the cycle of decision making for classroom teachers. This course prepares teachers by providing them with the essential elements needed to interpret reading assessment and data to monitor student growth and guide instruction.
  
  • GNE 709 - Principles of Brain-Based Learning: Teaching 21st Century Minds

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to enhance a participant’s knowledge of brain research. The following themes will be explored: brain development, information processing, memory and retention, transferring learning, and critical thinking. Participants in this course will explore ways to design brain-friendly and effective lesson plans using the latest scientific findings and discoveries. This course prepares teachers by providing them with the essential elements needed to translate the biology of brain-based learning from theory into classroom practice.
  
  • GNE 710 - Planning for the Inclusive Classroom: Developing Successful Frameworks

    3 Credit(s) This course provides K-12 general, special, and paraprofessional educators with concepts and strategies to promote the successful social and academic integration of children with disabilities, and those students at-risk for school failure, in the general education classroom. Participants will explore the benefits of collaborating with colleagues to design and implement effective instruction. A brief history of special education and federal policies related to general education teachers and a student’s least restrictive environment will be reviewed.  
  
  • GNE 712 - Technology in the 21st Century Math Classroom: Supporting Common Core Standards and Increasing Student Achievement

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed for mathematics educators and district mathematics curriculum directors interested in integrating technology into mathematics instruction in order to maximize student achievement. Participants will examine and evaluate software packages and tools, Web resources, and other instructional materials used to integrate technology into mathematics instruction. Additionally, the management and assessment of online learning environments and the Flipped Class model will be discussed.
  
  • GNE 713 - Teaching and Reaching 21st Century Online Learners

    3 Credit(s) This course provides educators with the skills for effective online teaching. It will include types of online teaching, concepts and structures of effective lesson creation and online instruction, technologies and strategies that support student engagement and increased learning, how to create and facilitate online communities, meeting content standards within an online classroom, and implementing formative assessments as a means to enhance online instruction.
  
  • GNE 716 - Destination Differentiation: How to Meet the Needs of 21st Century Learners

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to explore the critical need to differentiate instruction for 21st century learners. The philosophy of differentiation will be examined in relationship to cultural needs, learning styles, intelligence theories, and thinking skills. The use of technology and the role of effective feedback will be addressed. Participants will be provided opportunities to engage in discussions and activities that refine their current differentiation strategies in an effort to meet the needs of all learners.
  
  • GNE 717 - Transformative Classroom Leadership

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to provide teachers with research-based, proactive practices, and habits of mind for transformative classroom leadership. The following attributes will be explored: clarity of purpose, self-responsibility, relationships among students, and an increasing level of function over time (based on Schindler’s model of Transformative Classroom Management). Participants will learn how to discern the underlying effective teacher-student interactions so they can recognize how to proactively prevent misbehaviors and intervene effectively when misbehaviors occur.
  
  • GNE 719 - TechQuests: Teaching and Learning with Web and Mobile Technologies

    3 Credit(s) This course will provide K-16 educators the opportunity to understand and use web and mobile technologies to positively impact teaching and learning. Cell phones, audio players, netbooks and tablets, virtual worlds, simulations, and video games will be critiqued, analyzed, and evaluated for classroom uses. The WebQuest learning model will be explored including advanced search strategies, website evaluation criteria, and security. Teachers will use these technologies to develop relevant learning experiences to reinforce skills across curricula.
  
  • GNE 726 - Sheltered English Immersion Teacher’s Endorsement Course

    3 Credit(s) The purpose of this course is to prepare the Commonwealth’s teachers with the knowledge and skills to effectively shelter their content instruction, so that our growing population of English language learners (ELLs) can access curriculum, achieve academic success, and contribute their multilingual and multicultural resources as participants and future leaders in the 21st century global economy.
  
  • GNE 800 - Stand-alone Sheltering Content for English Language Learners

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to equip mainstream classroom teachers, reading specialists, and guidance counselors with the knowledge and skills to teach English Language Learners effectively at varying levels of English proficiency. Teachers will develop strategies linking English Language proficiency benchmarks with the Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. Objectives include appropriate assessment, planning, and implementation of sheltered content instruction. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • GPH 701 - Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism

    3 Credit(s) An overview of the broad field of hospitality and tourism emphasizing the understanding of the various phenomena within these industries. Theoretical perspectives on the growth of hospitality and tourism will be covered along with the breath of the industries within this realm, and an assessment of the supply and demand. This course provides the student with an introductory understanding of the nature and scope of hospitality and tourism, host and guest behavior, and affiliated activities.
  
  • GPH 702 - Tourism Dimensions

    3 Credit(s) The prospects, character and problems associated with tourism will be explored using a case study approach focusing on a variety of countries and regions, both developed and developing. Specific topics will include the nature and significance of tourism; economic, environmental and social impacts of tourism; and costs and benefits of tourism to destination areas.
  
  • GPH 750 - Geographies of the Holocaust

    3 Credit(s) This course provides students with a geographical understanding of the Holocaust. Through lecture and class discussion, students will learn how mapping and geo-visualization expand our understanding of the history of the Holocaust. Theories from cultural and political geography will be used to study how the Nazi’s constructed a spatial network of death, including ghettos and concentration camps. Nazi spatial policies of ethnic cleansing and controlling mobility will be examined. Refugee narratives will be used to study resistance to Nazi spatial and genocidal policies. The course concludes with the study of museums and memorials to the Holocaust and the role of such places in current debates over genocide, refugees and human rights.
     
  
  • GPH 754 - Geography of Canada

    3 Credit(s) This course is a survey of Canada’s physical and cultural geography. The emphasis is upon its population, transportation networks and economic activities.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 754.
  
  • GPH 800 - Geographic Background Behind European Problems

    3 Credit(s) This course treats physical, economic and cultural patterns as a background for understanding current problems of this region. Covers extensively the geographic setting of the United Kingdom, France, Netherlands, Germany and Russia, stressing basic advantages and disadvantages each have for industrial and agricultural development.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 800.
  
  • GPH 802 - Problems in Economic Geography

    3 Credit(s) A geographic examination of the principal theories in the study of the location of economic activities. This course seeks to develop an understanding of the reasons for the location of economic activities and the techniques involved in the examination.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 802.
  
  • GPH 804 - Marketing Geography

    3 Credit(s) The focus of this course is on the location of market places where consumers meet to purchase a product. Topics will include the theoretical aspects of locating market places and the empirical investigations that follow. The two major types of market places to be considered are central business districts and planned shopping centers.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 804.
  
  • GPH 808 - Settlement Geography

    3 Credit(s) A view of the forms and patterns of settlement; the evolution of settlements through time to the present; their distribution will be preceded by an examination of theoretical settlement geography.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 808.
  
  • GPH 810 - Meteorology

    3 Credit(s) An investigation into the composition and dynamics of the atmosphere including tropical and extra tropical circulation systems. Exploration of weather forecasting techniques includes familiarization with instrumentation, data analysis and use of synoptic surface maps and upper air charts.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 810.
  
  • GPH 813 - Topics in Recreation Geography

    3 Credit(s) In this course a study of spatial patterns as they apply to site development, location, and market regions of recreational facilities is included. Special topics include outdoor recreation (parks, water activities, playgrounds, etc.) leisure communities, tourism, and spectator sports. The course will involve an application of method to a specific field problem.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 813.
  
  • GPH 815 - Urban Planning: Zoning, Subdivision and Preservation

    3 Credit(s) A course that treats three important growth control techniques as three separate courses within one. The course will involve work with current Massachusetts legislation and will involve field inspections of zoning implementation, subdivision inspection and problems associated with wetlands and historic preservation. This course will be of value to persons not acquainted with the specifics of these topics as local Planning Boards deal with them. The Town of Danvers will serve as a study area.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 815.
  
  • GPH 875 - Directed Study in Geography

    3 Credit(s) The student will participate in an independent study of a selected topic in systematic or regional geography with emphasis on intensive research and analysis.This course may be taken up to 2 times for credit, and for multiple credit/sections within a term, provided that the special topic is different each time.
    Pre-requisites: Permission of instructor and graduate coordinator.
  
  • GPH 876 - Thesis

    3 Credit(s) In this course, the student develops a thesis proposal that requires a plan for empirical research on a significant geographic or geospatial question related to the student’s program of study. The proposal is developed under the supervision of a faculty member and thesis committee. This should be selected by students intending to continue toward a doctoral degree. Oral defense of the thesis and area of thesis study is required. A master copy
    will be retained in Salem State University Library.
    Pre-requisites: Final year of Master’s program, minimum 3.5 GPA in courses or invitation by a faculty sponsor, and approval in writing by both the faculty sponsor and the program coordinator. Required for students pursuing the thesis option.
     
  
  • GPH 900 - Seminar in Geography

    3 Credit(s) The seminar will be conducted by the graduate faculty of the department to stress research techniques and source materials in the various fields of geography. Additional major consideration will be given to the historical development of geographic thought from the period of the Ancient Greeks to the present.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 900.
  
  • GPH 903 - Geographic Information Systems

    3 Credit(s) Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are powerful and relatively new forms of spatial information processing used by business, industry, and government. GIS is a unique data base management system which incorporates analytic geographic techniques to capture, manipulate, analyze, and display spatial data. This course deals with the design and use of GIS an analytic tool stressing proper scientific method to ensure viable results.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 903.
  
  • GPH 904 - Geographic Information Systems for Research and Analysis

    3 Credit(s) This course examines how GIS is used for research or analysis and provides students with an opportunity to improve GIS skills. Students review literature on major theories and methods of geographic inquiry, as well as case studies. Students develop a research question and plan, conduct GIS analysis, and communicate findings.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 904.
  
  • GPH 909 - Interpretation/Analysis of Remote Sensing Imagery

    3 Credit(s) The emphasis is on the study of remote sensing systems other than aerial photography. High altitude color-infrared photography - CIR, multi-spectral scanned imagery - MSS, side-looking airborne RADAR - SLAR, and thermal-infrared images - TIR, are investigated. The present and potential uses of these image products is studied with regard to academic and practical applications. Student mastery of the subject is exemplified by a series of detailed interpretive map overlays.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 909.
  
  • GPH 910 - Digital Analysis of Remotely Sensed Imagery

    3 Credit(s) Investigation of the fundamentals of digital image processing as applied to remotely sensed data. Study of the physics of light and the hardware systems used to record specific wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. Laboratory and field work related to the digital analysis of LANDSAT and SPOT imagery in a sequence of analytic procedures common to problem solving. Three lecture hours per week plus local field trips.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 910.
  
  • GPH 942 - Advanced Geographic Quantitative Methods

    3 Credit(s) This course explores the use of linear and non-linear spatial multi-variate techniques as they relate to Geographic Information Science.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 942.
  
  • GPH 945 - Geographic Information System Project Implementation

    3 Credit(s) This course prepares the student to develop, implement and maintain Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students are exposed to GIS analysis and design employing a structured method approach. Further, the student is shown how to identify, track and correct system errors throughout the GIS implementation process. Students gain “hands on” experience by developing a GIS prototype.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 945.
  
  • GPH 946 - Computer Assisted Cartographic Modeling

    3 Credit(s) This course presents concepts and applied uses of computer-assisted cartographic modeling. Topics include model development and implementation in applied environmental, demographic, and retail applications.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 946.
  
  • GPH 952 - Spatial Database Analysis and Design

    3 Credit(s) This course introduces the student to the methods and techniques currently used in spatial data base design and analysis. The student gains proficiency in the structured method approach to analysis and design as applied to spatial data management and integration to the geo-computing environment.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 952.
  
  • GPH 953 - Seminar in GIS Applications I

    3 Credit(s) This course presents various applications in the use of GIS in Environmental and Automated flapping and Facilities Management applications. Students are presented an opportunity to critically evaluate the applications and present solutions to implementation problems. This course may be taken up to 3 times for credit, and for multiple credit/sections within a term, provided that the special topic is different each time.
    Pre-requisites: GPH 903  or permission of instructor.
     
  
  • GPH 954 - Seminar in GIS Applications II

    3 Credit(s) This course presents various applications in the use of GIS in Marketing, Sales, Insurance, and Health Industries. Students are presented the opportunity to critically evaluate the applications and suggest solutions to implementation problems. This course may be taken up to 3 times for credit, and for multiple credit/sections within a term, provided that the special topic is different each time.
    Pre-requisites: GPH 903 or permission of instructor.
  
  • GPH 955 - GIS Practicum

    4 Credit(s) Students will participate in a GIS project currently under development in a public and/or private agency. Students will develop a final report and present findings in a public forum.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 955.
    Prerequisites: GPH 945 , GPH 950 , GPH 952 , GPH 953  or permission of instructor.
  
  • GPH 960 - Software Design and Programming in GIS

    3 Credit(s) This course is a graduate-level introduction to programming for GIS graduate students. The fundamental concepts of computer software design and programming will be introduced within the geoprocessing framework. Basic concepts of different programming paradigms will be presented with an emphasis on object-oriented paradigm. Students will develop skills in software design and programming techniques to explore, manipulate and model spatial data. Three lecture hours and extensive programming work outside of class.
    Prerequisites:  or approval of the instructor is required.
     
  
  • GPH 965 - Seminar in Geographic Information Systems

    4 Credit(s) To provide advanced study of specialized topics of importance to geographic information systems (GIS). Will include in-depth examination of scientific literature in an interactive seminar format concerning theoretical, applied and operational issues related to GIS and their development and applications. A substantial research paper on an approved topic is required for completion of the course. Course is required for students choosing the non-thesis option in the MS Geo-Information Science program and is recommended for students who intend to write a thesis.
    Not open to students who have received credit for GGR 965.
    Prerequisites: GPH 945  and at least 23 other graduate credits towards the MS Geo-Information Science degree.
  
  • GPH 994-997 - Special Programs in Geographic Education

    3 Credit(s) Special programs in Geographic education are those courses, summer institutes, and programs offered by geography faculty as the opportunity arises. Most often they serve the needs of students pursuing graduate degrees in education.
  
  • HRI 702 - Lodging Operations Management

    3 Credit(s) This course explores and analyzes the principles and practices of lodging management and related sales activities. The management of and interaction among various divisions of lodging operations are addressed, including general management, front office/housekeeping/engineering divisions, food and beverage operations, sales and marketing, accounting and finance. Focus of the course is on communication both within and among departments, divisions and most importantly, with the consumer.
  
  • HRI 704 - Food and Beverage Management

    3 Credit(s) This course provides the student with an overview of the food and beverage industry, and a close look at the functional and control elements which make up a food and beverage business. Peripheral elements will be explored such as legislation, nutrition, industry trends, safety and sanitation. Detailed and advanced examination of the elements within the “hospitality and service” industry will explore how they impact the profit and loss of the Food and Beverage industry.
  
  • HRI 720 - Hospitality Marketing and Sales

    3 Credit(s) This course applies marketing principles in hotel, restaurant and institutional management settings. Topics include:  the marketing philosophy, market research, market segmentation, and marketing mix strategies related to programming, distributing, pricing and promoting leisure services. Included in this is marketing and sales of a wide variety of businesses, and coordination of all hospitality departments and their roles in assuring success of the marketing effort.
  
  • HRI 750 - Meetings, Conferences and Convention Management

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the strategic and logistical considerations in managing the planning, development, marketing and implementation of the meetings, events, conferences, conventions, exhibitions, and trade show industries. Emphasis is placed on both the supply (product and service providers) and demand (meeting and event managers) elements. In addition, the course focuses on the unique operational and managerial functions of the multifaceted component of the tourism and hospitality industry.
 

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