May 26, 2024  
2020-2021 School of Graduate Studies Catalog 
    
2020-2021 School of Graduate Studies Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Graduate Courses


 
  
  • HRI 775 - Advanced Casino Theory and Practice

    3 Credit(s) This graduate level casino gaming course is an advanced introduction to the casino environment. Beginning with the history of gaming in America, the student will become aware of societal costs and benefits associated with casinos and understand possible negative gaming behaviors. Using theoretical underpinnings of gaming, students will learn rules and security procedures related to each major casino game; calculate house odds, win, and hold; and analyze standard accounting and back-office cash procedures.
  
  • HST 700 - Historiography

    3 Credit(s) The course includes an examination of the mechanics employed in the study, research, and writing of history. The philosophies, techniques, styles, emphases, and interpretations employed by prominent historians through the ages are studied. Lectures, discussions, oral reports, and written papers will be utilized.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 700.
    Pre-requisite:  Permission of the MA History Coordinator
  
  • HST 702 - Methods, Techniques, and Strategies in Teaching History

    3 Credit(s) Pedagogical principles, strategies, methods and techniques to improve classroom effectiveness for differing student populations. Includes pre-practicum, field based experience.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 702.
  
  • HST 703 - Oral and Video History

    3 Credit(s) An introduction to the methodology of oral and video history and its relationship to contemporary historical investigation. Students will develop technical mastery of oral and video history through classroom presentation and by conducting interviews with individuals who are knowledgeable about the topic under investigation. Interviews will be deposited in an appropriate historical archive. Students will review the practical, ethical, and legal uses of oral and video history as digital media. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • HST 704 - History Alive: Using Cultural Resources to Teach History

    3 Credit(s) This course provides teachers of history with practical experience in the utilization of the historical and cultural resource of the Boston metropolitan region. This course also equips educational specialists with knowledge and skills that will aid them in assisting teachers to use their institution’s resources most effectively.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 704.
  
  • HST 705 - Institute: Information Technology in History

    3 Credit(s) This institute develops concepts, skills and capabilities for using information technology in history. It examines the role of information technology in the research, writing, presenting and teaching of history and aims to develop specific competencies in Web site evaluation, basic data analysis, Web page evaluation/development and multimedia presentations.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 705.
  
  • HST 706 - Institute: Preserving the Past: Enrichment of the Social Studies Curriculum

    3 Credit(s) This five day institute is intended to introduce teachers to skills, knowledge, and resources which will help them to develop units and programs which will aid students in the development of a solid historical foundation while at the same time helping them to recognize that history is alive and has societal values. This institute will treat a different topic each year.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 706.
  
  • HST 707 - The Production of History

    3 Credit(s) This course examines how history and memory circulate through public life in modern societies, and how and why the past matters to individuals, groups and institutions. Among the topics we will examine are the relationship between scholarly historians and their publics, historical fiction, genealogy, collecting and memorabilia, debates over textbooks and school curricula, and practices of amateur history and reenactment.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 787.

     

     

  
  • HST 709 - Institute for the Study of Local History

    3 Credit(s) The Institute will provide teachers, historical society and museum staff members, librarians, volunteers and interested lay-persons with the instruction and practical knowledge which will allow them to approach their undertaking with a professional attitude. Participants will be expected to complete a research project.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 709.
  
  • HST 710 - Museum Studies

    3 Credit(s) Drawing upon the activities of many area museums, this course considers a number of aspects of museum development and management and is suitable for students with varied academic interests and work experiences. Among the matters examined are financial management, computerization, exhibit design and development, governance, collections, and organizational policies.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 788N.

     

     

  
  • HST 711 - Historic Archaeology

    3 Credit(s) Utilizing the rich resources of New England, this course introduces archaeological methodology, focusing on documents, artifacts, and other data from the period 1600 to 1850. Topics include material culture and architecture, and crafts and industries, as related to the colonial and early national periods.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 789N.

     

     

  
  • HST 712 - Archives and Records Management

    3 Credit(s) Through readings, lectures, and hands-on experience, the course will familiarize students with the scope of archival theory and current archival practices. Topics include: arrangement and description of archival collections, collection development, records management, reference and access, historical use of documents, and preservation of archival materials.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 793.

     

     

  
  • HST 713 - Introduction to the Public Life of History

    3 Credit(s) This course introduces the history, theory, and practice of pubic history. It examines the ideas and questions that shape and are shaped by public engagements with the past and the practical concerns that confront public historians and citizens as they explore, examine, interpret and utilize the past. There are no prerequisites.
  
  • HST 800 - Seminar in Early American History

    3 Credit(s) The course offers opportunities for intensive examination of highly specialized areas of historiographical importance in Early American history. May be repeated for credit with permission of the department chair.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 912.

     

     

  
  • HST 801 - The American Colonies to 1763

    3 Credit(s) The voyages of exploration and discovery; the establishment of European colonies in the Western Hemisphere; their subsequent political, economic, social and cultural development; and the colonial wars are considered.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 710.
  
  • HST 802 - The American Revolution, Critical Period and Federalist Era

    3 Credit(s) The place of the American colonies in the British imperial system, its effects on them, and their reaction to imperial policies is included. The causes, events, consequences, and various interpretations of the American Revolution are considered, as are the “Critical Period” under the Articles of Confederation, the adoption of the Constitution, and the Age of Federalism.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 711.
  
  • HST 803 - Material Culture of Early America

    3 Credit(s) Covers the identification, classification, and interpretation of the artifacts and decorative art of early America. Handcrafted and mass produced materials of both domestic and foreign manufacture will be considered. Focus is on the material culture of New England prior to 1860, and its interpretation by archaeologists, historians and museum professionals.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 790.

     

     

  
  • HST 804 - Architecture and Landscape of Early America

    3 Credit(s) A study of the built, cultivated, and natural environment from colonial settlement to the nineteenth century. The course also provides a detailed overview of historical preservation and cultural resource management. Emphasis is placed on how architecture and landscape have shaped the New England experience.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 791.

     

     

  
  • HST 809 - Topics in American History

    3 Credit(s) The course offers an examination of a specialized topic in American History. It emphasizes intensive analysis of primary sources as well investigation of readings that reflect fresh trends in research strategies or interpretive directions. The instructor will determine selection of the course topic. Three lecture hours per week. This course may be taken up to three times on different topics.
  
  • HST 811 - The Civil War

    3 Credit(s) This course covers the period from 1848 to 1865 and examines the many factors leading to disunion, the conduct of the war by both the U.S. and Confederate governments, the constitutional questions, the economic and social issues, public opinion and morale. Military affairs will receive only brief consideration. The impact of the war and its meaning will be assessed and the historiography of the period explored.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 713.
  
  • HST 812 - The Age of Change: the United States, Late 19th and Early 20th Centuries

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the changing American scene between the end of the Civil War and the onset of World War I. Topics such as Reconstruction, the rise of labor, demographic changes, Populism, and Progressivism will be considered in the light of the great alterations in socio-economic practices and ideas which occurred during the period.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 714.
  
  • HST 813 - Topics in U. S. Legal History

    3 Credit(s) This course examines in depth major substantive and procedural themes in the history of American law. Topics include Fundamental Rights; Economic Regulation and Freedom of Contract; Race, Gender and the Law; The Expansion of Tort Liability.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 722.
  
  • HST 815 - Puritanism and the Founding of New England

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the role of Puritanism in the early development of New England. It explores the origins of Puritan belief and practice and its adaptation in a New World environment, and examines topics such as interactions with Native Americans, the evolution of congregationalism, and political, economic, and cultural development.
  
  • HST 820 - U.S. Women’s History, 1776-Present: An Introduction

    3 Credit(s) Combining mini-lectures with intensive readings and discussion, this course surveys women’s historical experience in the United States from the American Revolution to the present. It is intended to introduce students to the methodology of women’s history, in addition to exploring the often hidden and forgotten dimensions of the American past. This course presents women’s history as an integral part of United States history and as a unique subject of historical investigation.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 812.

     

     

  
  • HST 825 - African American History to 1865

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the development and social construction of black America from its ancestral roots in West Africa to Reconstruction with emphasis on the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the growth of domestic slavery, racial formation, community development, and the juxtaposition of slavery and freedom in early United States history.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 756.

     

     

  
  • HST 826 - African American History from 1865 to the Present

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the development and social construction of black America since Reconstruction with emphasis on black social thought, political protest, and community development. Attention is given to the ways black Americans have been active historical agents in their creation and United States history.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 757.

     

     

  
  • HST 835 - Seminar: United States in the 20th Century

    3 Credit(s) Studies in depth in the significant political, economic, constitutional, and cultural changes in the United States since 1900. Individual research papers and reports are required.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 913.

     

     

  
  • HST 840 - Latinos in the United States

    3 Credit(s) History of the different Latino Populations in the United States, beginning with the Nineteenth century wars which brought large portions of Mexico under U.S. control, and tracing the major waves of migration from Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central America. Conditions in the sending countries, U.S. influence, and different immigrant groups’ experiences in the United States. A historical perspective on Latino life including identity, work, community, family, and political activism.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 725.
  
  • HST 850 - End of the Ancient World

    3 Credit(s) This course traces the break-up of the Roman Empire from the fourth to the sixth centuries A.D.; the barbaric invasions and the rise of Christianity.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 738.
  
  • HST 851 - War and Society in the Ancient Mediterranean

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the cultures of Ancient Greece and Rome from the perspective of warfare, examining not only how and why these societies made war but how their warfare shaped and was shaped by each society as a whole.
  
  • HST 852 - The World of Herodotos

    3 Credit(s) Through close and extensive work with Herodotos’ Histories, this course examines the growth of Greek democracy, the larger world in which Greek culture emerged, and the confrontation between the Greek city-states and the Persian empire.
  
  • HST 855 - Late Medieval and Renaissance History

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to familiarize the students with the major historical events of the period; to illustrate the major historical interpretations through assigned readings and lectures; to develop an awareness of the reasons behind the religious, cultural, political, and economic tensions of the day, with particular stress upon the development of humanism and individualism.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 741.
  
  • HST 856 - Early Modern England, 1485-1800

    3 Credit(s) This course surveys the civilization of early modern England by tracing the development of English structures, institutions, mentalities and events from the internal strife of the fifteenth-century Wars of the Roses to the external challenges of the eighteenth-century American and French Revolutions. A comparative approach will be utilized, encouraging students to place English developments in a European and global context.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 742.
  
  • HST 860 - Seminar: Expansion of Europe

    3 Credit(s) The European exploration, oceanic discovery, trade and settlement, 1450-present is included. Particular emphasis is placed upon the interrelationships of Europeans and the various peoples and civilizations contacted in extending the ideals of Europe to Asia, Africa and the Americas.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 940.

     

     

  
  • HST 861 - The European Enlightenment and Eighteenth-Century Culture

    3 Credit(s) This course will examine the social and cultural history of the eighteenth century giving special attention to the Enlightenment, the intellectual movement that has come to characterize the age. Attention will be given to contemporary and later critiques of this movement.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 810.

     

     

  
  • HST 862 - French Revolution and Napoleonic Empire

    3 Credit(s) This course will explore the French Revolution and Napoleonic Empire through the writing of selected major historians and primary source material. Examples of topics to be discussed include: the origins of the Revolution, the historical debates about the Revolution, the Great Terror, the Directory, the rise of Napoleon, and the French Revolution’s influence in Europe and the Atlantic World.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 811.

     

  
  • HST 870 - The Great War and European Culture

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the intellectual, cultural, and social impact of World War One on Europe. It explores the prewar roots and causes of the war, the multiple experiences of combatants and noncombatants during the war, and the social, literary, and cultural movements and ideas emerging from these wartime experiences.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 747.
  
  • HST 871 - Russia Since 1917

    3 Credit(s) The course examines the fall of Imperial Russia; the Provisional Government; the Bolshevik Revolution; the Lenin Regime; relations with Germany and the West; the Stalin Regime; the Five Year Plans; World War II; the Cold Wars; changing economic and political conditions; Krushchev; the Sino-Soviet split; the new Regime.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 748.
  
  • HST 876 - Europe Since 1914

    3 Credit(s) The course studies a continent at war and its political, economic, social, psychological, and cultural impact. Particular attention will be given to the critical inter-war years, 1919-1939.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 751.
  
  • HST 877 - Nazi Germany

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the Nazi era in Germany from 1933-1945. Particular emphasis will be on emergence of Nazism within postwar fascist movements, the political, social and cultural context for the rise and consolidation of Nazism in Germany, the social, cultural and racial ideologies of Nazism and its ultimate defeat in World War II.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 752N.

     

  
  • HST 879 - The Holocaust

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the Holocaust in the context of modern European history. It explores the roots of antisemitism in Europe, the racialism of Nazi ideology and the social, political, and cultural factors leading to the genocide of millions of Jews and other groups during World War II.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 797.

     

     

  
  • HST 880 - The Second World War in Europe

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the diplomatic, military, political, social and cultural dimensions of World War II in Europe. It analyzes the origins, events and outcomes of the war in Europe and explores how this central twentieth century event transformed European and world history.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 798.

     

     

  
  • HST 881 - The Balkans, 1204-1804: From Empire to Nations

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the history of Southeastern Europe from the fall of Constantinople to Western Crusaders in 1204. This marks the end of Byzantine imperial hegemony in the region, through the period of Ottoman conquest and rule, to the origins of national revival and liberation movements among the Balkan peoples at the start of the 19th century.

       

  
  • HST 899 - Select Topics in European History

    3 Credit(s) An examination of specialized topics of European history. The emphasis will be on historiographical debates or issues within the topic area and will include advanced historical readings and research. May be repeated for credit with the permission of the Department Chairperson.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 881.

     

     

  
  • HST 900 - Colonial Latin America

    3 Credit(s) Pre-Columbian societies and Spanish and Portuguese conquest and colonialism, social relations in the colonies, and the growth of nationalist movements leading to independence in the nineteenth century. The course focuses on Mexico, the Andean region, the Caribbean, and Brazil as examples of different patterns of slave society, mestizaje, religious syncretism, indigenous and peasant rebellion, and complex alliances leading to national independence and identity.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 730R.
  
  • HST 901 - Modern Latin America

    3 Credit(s) Political, economic and social development of Latin America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including problems of economic development, dependency, and poverty and inequality; different forms of social movements, rebellion and revolution; race, gender and ethnicity; U.S.-Latin America relations; and literary and intellectual movements including dependency theory, liberation theology, magical realism, and testimonial literature.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 731R.
  
  • HST 905 - Themes in the History of Pre-Colonial Africa

    3 Credit(s) This course examines controversial issues in the study of pre-colonial Africa. Themes could include Africa and Egypt, Bantu origins and migration, stateless and state societies, long-distance trade, Islam in Africa, slavery, and women in African societies. Three lecture hours per week.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 763.

     

     

  
  • HST 906 - Themes in the History of Colonial and Modern Africa: 1870-Present

    3 Credit(s) This course examines controversial issues in the study of colonial and modern Africa. Themes could include the partition of Africa, collaboration or resistance to European rule, ideologies of domination, settler colonies, exploitation or development, nationalism and decolonization. Three lecture hours per week.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 765.

     

     

  
  • HST 910 - Development of Japan

    3 Credit(s) The course deals with the history of Japan from the earliest times to the present. Japan’s origins as a unique Far Eastern society are discussed and her relationships with China, Russia, and the western powers are assessed.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 770.

     

     

  
  • HST 911 - Modern China 1800-1949

    3 Credit(s) The course focuses on China between the Opium War of 1840-1842 and the Communist triumph of 1949. It examines many of the key issues that greatly influenced modern Chinese history including Western imperialism, the Taiping and Boxer movements, the Republican Revolution, the Nationalist Revolution, the Sino-Japanese War, and the Victory of the Communist Party.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 771N.

     

     

  
  • HST 912 - Contemporary China 1949-Present

    3 Credit(s) The course examines the history of the People’s Republic. It covers Mao Zedong and the Cultural Revolution, Deng Xiaoping and his reform, as well as recent social, economic, and political transformations that led China into the twenty-first century. The course pays special attention to China and the world community.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 773N.

     

     

  
  • HST 913 - Topics in Chinese History

    3 Credit(s) The course studies different Chinese historical topics in different semesters. Pending on demands, study subjects may include topics such as Confucianism, the Silk Road, the Opium War, Chiang Kai-shek, Mao Zedong, the Cultural Revolution, Chinese women, and other ancient or modern issues. The course may be repeated for different topics for credit with chairperson’s permission. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 772N.


     

     

  
  • HST 951 - History of United States-East Asian Relations

    3 Credit(s) This course examines key issues in United States-East Asian relations, including American China trade, Perry and the open door of Japan, the Pacific War, and the post-Cold War economic exchanges. It seeks to understand the U.S. role and actions of East Asian countries. The course emphasizes Chinese and Japanese domestic influences upon their relations with the U.S.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 774.

     

     

  
  • HST 952 - The Cold War in Asia

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the Cold War in Asia, focusing on the interactions between East and Southeast Asia and the United States. It analyzes the Korean War, the Taiwan Strait crisis, the Vietnam War, the Sino-Soviet split, and the US-China rapprochement. Course readings include both original documents and recent interpretations.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 775.

     

     

  
  • HST 953 - Chinese Business and Economic History

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the history of Chinese business and economic development from antiquity to the present. It discusses Chinese business and economic theories as well as their political and social manifestations. The course links business and economic development with social and cultural progress in China.
  
  • HST 954 - Colonial India

    3 Credit(s) This course offers an introduction to the political, social, economic, and cultural dimensions of the history of India under British colonial rule. It also explores the relationship between colonialism and an emerging sense of nationalism in India during the nineteenth and twentieth century. Our goal will be to familiarize ourselves with the main events and themes of colonial history, as well as the historiographical debates in studying this period of India’s past.
  
  • HST 956 - The British Empire Since 1783

    3 Credit(s) This course is an introduction to the British Empire since 1783. It focuses on what historians have called the ‘Second British Empire,” a period after 1783 marked by unprecedented expansion and a transition from older empire of the Atlantic world to the new colonies in Asia and Africa. The course considers major themes and historical debates relevant to the empire’s expansion in Asia and Africa throughout the nineteenth century and its eventual dissolution in the twentieth century. No prerequisites. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • HST 989 - Topics in World History

    3 Credit(s) This course examines literature, themes, theories, concepts and methods of world history, including comparisons of societies and cultural regions, processes of cross-cultural interaction, the development of civilizations, and large-scale patterns that influence historical development on a transregional or global scale. Topics may include colonialism, world system theories, trade, migration, race and ethnicity, gender and disease. May be repeated for credit with permission of the Department Chairperson.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 880.

     

     

  
  • HST 990 - Internship

    3 Credit(s) Individual or group tutorial and supervised field experience in areas such as archival management, historical editing, archaeological preservation, museum exhibition, legal research in public and private repositories.
    Not open to students who have received credit for HIS795.

     

  
  • HST 991 - History Study and Travel Seminar

    3 Credit(s) A study and travel course that incorporates a research trip to a location appropriate to the course. Topic varies. May be repeated for credit with the permission of the department chair.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 796.

     

     

  
  • HST 992 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An individualized in-depth research under the personal direction of a departmental specialist in an area of choice will be conducted.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 875/876.

     

     

  
  • HST 993 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An individualized in-depth research under the personal direction of a departmental specialist in an area of choice will be conducted.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 875/876.

     

  
  • HST 994 - Directed Study in Portfolio

    2 Credit(s) The portfolio is a semester long project in which students in the M.A. History Program showcase the work that they have produced, engage in substantive revisions, and create a master narrative (15-20 pages) that explains the students’ historical, political, pedagogical, and philosophical trajectory. The student works closely with a faculty advisor and then has an oral defense with the advisor and two additional faculty members.
  
  • HST 995 - Research Seminar

    3 Credit(s) This seminar is designed to develop the student’s ability to conduct original research and write a formal historical paper, benefiting from both faculty and peer review of work in progress. Required for MA candidates in History.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 990.
    Pre-requisites: HST 700  and completion of 18 credit hours.
  
  • HST 999 - Thesis

    6 Credit(s) The content is the same as above, but with an opportunity for more extensive work in the field. This should be selected by students intending to continue toward a doctoral degree. Oral defense of the thesis and area of thesis study is required. A master copy will be retained in Salem State University Library.
    Not open to students who have received credits for HIS 999.

     

     

  
  • IDS 705 - Pedagogy of Scientific Methods and Inquiry

    3 Credit(s) The course presents the central themes of science; the history of science; the fundamental principles of scientific inquiry theory and experimentation; and the work of individuals who have shaped the tradition of scientific inquiry. Included are methods of conveying science content in ways to engage learners and demonstrate the principles of good teaching practice.
    Pre-requisite: Acceptance into the MAT in Middle School General Science program at Salem State University or permission of the Program Coordinator.
  
  • IDS 706 - Experiential Scientific Research

    3 Credit(s) Scientific inquiry is based on investigations using the Scientific Method, as an approach to problem solving. After consultation with their advisor and approval by the graduate committee, students will conduct a research project incorporating selective course materials acquired throughout the Middle School Initiative. Students will practice principles of experimental design and data analysis as they implement their projects. Students will present their research both in class and in Graduate Research Symposium using various media.
    Pre-requisite: Completion of all other coursework.
  
  • IDS 710 - Critical Thinking and Analytical Writing

    3 Credit(s) Develops high-level critical thinking through the preparation of extensive written work including a substantial research paper that demonstrates ability to reason complexly and recognize the relationships among ideas, to synthesize disparate information into a coherent whole, to order information and arguments according to importance, and to use relevant evidence from reputable sources, correct citation, and correct written English.
  
  • IDS 725 - Information Technology Fluency in Professional Practice

    3 Credit(s) This course develops key skills, concepts and capabilities in information technology fluency to enable students to solve problems and continuously adapt to the rapid changes transforming the professional workplace. Students will develop these skills, concepts and capabilities through completion of a series of theoretical and applied projects. Students also acquire knowledge and understanding of the legal, cultural, and social implications of information technology profusion. Familiarity with the Microsoft Office Suite of applications is expected for this course.
  
  • IDS 730 - Post-WWII Genocides

    3 Credit(s) This course will examine post-WWII genocides through an interdisciplinary perspective of the social sciences and state policy analysis. This course will review the literature related to the complex causes of state sponsored genocide and the policy choices made by the United Nations, the United States, and other individual states in response to genocide.
  
  • IDS 731 - Perspectives on Evil and the Holocaust

    3 Credit(s) Focusing on the Holocaust as a model of genocidal intent and a case study to help in understanding the psychology and philosophy of evil, the course will explore the mentality of those who designed and carried out the “final solution” as well as those complicit with them.
  
  • IDS 735 - Human Rights and International Law

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the developments and contemporary challenges concerning human rights and international law. A central focus will be on international agreements and organizations that have been created since the aftermath of World War II and the passage of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. Major topics include human rights principles, norms, advocacy, and enforcement mechanisms through domestic, regional and international institutions.
  
  • IDS 738 - Refugee and Asylum Law, Policies and Programs

    3 Credit(s)

    This course will examine the international refugee crisis. The course will cover the international and domestic laws and policies that pertain to refugee rights and state obligations, including the asylum system in the United States. We will explore the causes of the dramatic increase in refugee populations around the world, and we will assess the proposed reforms, humanitarian efforts, and preventive measures of the United Nations, NGOs, the United States, and other state actors.

  
  • IDS 740 - Genocide, War Crimes and International Law

    3 Credit(s) This course will examine the institutional means for holding individuals accountable for human rights atrocities under international criminal law. The course will cover the international conventions and treaties that form the basis of substantive war crimes law, as well as the international and domestic tribunals established to serve the interests of justice.
  
  • IDS 763 - Topics in American Studies

    3 Credit(s) An intensive interdisciplinary examination of a topic significant in the formation of American culture. Potential topics may be (but are not limited to) immigration, popular culture, religion or consumerism and may be centered in a particular historical era. Students will examine texts drawn from art, literature, history or other fields, and develop an extended research project in a chosen area.
  
  • ITL 706 - Seminar in Italian Literature

    3 Credit(s) This course features in-depth study of a particular topic in Italian literature, which may include the study of a particular genre, theme, or literary period. The course topic, selected by the professor, will emphasize the analysis of literary texts and may include a focus on stylistics, cultural themes and/or historical context. Conducted entirely in Italian. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisite: Intermediate to advanced fluency in written and spoken Italian.
  
  • ITL 707 - Topics in Italian Culture

    3 Credit(s) This course features in-depth study of a topic in Italian culture, which may include the study of a particular field, theme, or historica period. The course topic, selected by the professor, will emphasize the analysis of cultural material and may include a focus on cultural themes and/or historical context. Conducted entirely in Italian. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisite:  Intermediate to advanced fluency in written and spoken Italian, as demonstrated by completion of undergraduate coursework in Italian at the post-intermediate level (300-level or higher). teaching certification in Italian, or permission of the insturctor.
  
  • LBS 710 - Reference Materials and Research

    3 Credit(s) This course provides an in-depth examination of the characteristics, uses, and design of information system for reference sources, and appropriate technologies. This course provides a survey of topics in reference services, reference works, and research skills appropriate for elementary, middle and high school libraries. Students develop knowledge of concepts, current trends, and ideas relevant to reference work, research strategies, comparative critical skills, and ethical issues affecting library media specialists through weekly hands-on activities.
  
  • LBS 724 - Digital Resources K-12

    3 Credit(s) This course provides future library teachers with an exploration of curriculum-connected digital resources with a strong focus on community and government resources. It includes tools and apps for working with staff as well as students. Material covering the entire K-12 spectrum is included. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the critical evaluation of resources in light of school needs. Three lecture hours per week.

     

  
  • LBS 730 - Managing and Evaluating the School Library Program

    3 Credit(s) This course will examines in detail new and timely issues centered around the development, organization, management and evaluation of future-ready school libraries. Topics include the Learning Commons model, facility design, leadership, evaluation of school libraries at all levels, advocacy as well as coverage of daily management skills and duties. A 25-hour pre-practicum experience is a part of this course.
  
  • LBS 750 - Instructional and Curriculum Materials for a Media Literate Society

    3 Credit(s) This course focuses on selection, adaption, and production of instructional materials for teaching information and media literacy to K-12 library students. The course also examines collaboration with subject area teachers and federal and state laws governing access to and reproduction of materials. Additional topics include technological literacy and curriculum standards. This course incorporates a 25-hour field observation experience for the prospective library teacher. The observation experiences prepare the student for the upcoming practicum.
  
  • LBS 803 - K-12 Literature Survey

    3 Credit(s) This course will introduce students to literature appropriate for children and young adults grades K-12. Via author studies, book studies, genre studies, lectures, presentations, and discussions students will be exposed to a variety of literature, both fiction and nonfiction. The course is divided into two parts, the first half of the course we will examine literature appropriate for children in K-5th grade, and the second half will focus on literature appropriate for children in 6th-12th grade.
  
  • LBS 815 - Instructional Resource Selection and Curriculum Development K-12

    3 Credit(s) This course covers issues, policies and procedures for K-12 materials selection. Selection guidelines, censorship, budget ramifications and program design are the four major areas to be explored. Students will conduct their explorations through readings, collaborative projects, observations, case studies and development of exemplary materials. A 25 hour pre-practicum experience is a part of this course.
  
  • LBS 850 - Emerging Technologies for Libraries

    3 Credit(s) This course presents tools and strategies for managing today’s evolving school library and K-12 landscape. This course covers the organization of information resources including computer and internet-based methods of cataloging physical materials; tools and applications for using information resources and providing library services; and methods to support school personnel in improving student learning through technology. Special focus will be placed on adaptive and assistive technologies to ensure access for all students.
  
  • LBS 875 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a member of the Library Science Faculty.
  
  • LBS 876 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a member of the Library Science Faculty.
  
  • LBS 900N - Practicum Experience for the Library Teacher

    3 Credit(s) The Practicum experience consists of 300 hours of supervised experience split between two school library media centers at different levels (elementary, middle, high school). This practical experience allows the students to demonstrate their knowledge of the various professional competencies required of library media specialists.
  
  • LBS 900P - Practicum Experience for the Library Teacher

    1.5 - 3 Credit(s) A full semester of library classroom field experience (or half semester for students meeting requirements for a reduction, with required hours divided in half between two of three levels: elementary, middle and high school. Students work with a tenured practitioner with appropriate supervision and classroom visitations provided by the University. This course, along with LBS 900PS  , is designed for students seeking initial Licensure Library Teacher to be able to work in Massachusetts K-12 public schools.
    Pre-requisites: Satisfactory completion of all applicable MTEL tests, pre-practicum hours and Program Coordinator approval.
  
  • LBS 900PS - Practicum Seminar for the Library Teacher

    1.5 - 3 Credit(s) This seminar is taken in conjunction with LBS 900P  as part of the full semester (or half semester for students meeting requirements for a reduction) field experience working with a tenured practitioner in two library classrooms. The seminar provides pedagogical and content support to enhance the field experience. With LBS 900P these courses are designed for students seeking Initial Licensure Library Teacher to work n Massachusetts K-12 public schools.
    Prerequisites:  Satisfactory Completion of all applicable MTEL tests, pre-practicum hours and Program coordinator approval
  
  • MAT 701 - Vector and Tensor Analysis

    3 Credit(s) Suggested topics are: Definition of vectors and transformation equations, general Cartesian co-ordinates; vector and scalar products, geometry of space curves; introduction to differential forms and tensors.
  
  • MAT 702N - Research on Teaching Methods in Mathematics I

    3 Credit(s) This course will allow the student to find and study models of accomplished researchers on the teaching of Mathematics at the secondary level. The course will examine necessary concepts in research validity; data gathering; instrumentation selection and construction; validation and reliability determinations; sampling techniques; and, research designing. Further, the course will review the application of statistical models salient to designs utilized in conducting research which requires the testing of hypotheses that have been generated from problems in secondary Mathematics. Open only to MAT and M.Ed. candidates for degree credit.
    Pre-requisites: Completed course in statistics and completion of the Measurement and Evaluation standard.
  
  • MAT 704 - Linear Algebra

    3 Credit(s) Topics include modules, linear dependence, matrix algebra, linear transformations, determinants, eigenvalues, linear systems, inner products, classical groups, diagonalization, symmetric matrices, function spaces, and differential operators.
    Pre-requisites: 6 hours of calculus and 3 hours of linear algebra.
  
  • MAT 705 - Modern Plane Geometry

    3 Credit(s) Suggested topics are: axiomatic approach to plane geometry, parallel postulate, Euclidean and hyperbolic geometries; quadratic extensions and angle trisection; plane measure.
    Pre-requisite: Two semesters of calculus.
  
  • MAT 706 - Theory of Numbers

    3 Credit(s) Suggested topics are: properties of divisibility, linear congruences; quadratic congruences; prime numbers, continued fractions; number-theoretic functions; primitive roots and quadratic residues.
    Pre-requisite: Permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
  • MAT 707 - Mathematical Statistics

    3 Credit(s) A calculus-based study of probability and statistics. Topics include probability models, discrete and continuous random variables and their distributions, bivariate and multivariate distributions, sampling distributions, limit theorems, point and interval estimation, theory and applications of hypothesis testing, linear regression and correlation.
    Pre-requisite: 12 hours of calculus.
  
  • MAT 708 - Introduction to Cryptography

    3 Credit(s) An introduction to cryptography - the study of methods of sending messages in disguised form, including some recent applications of number theory and group theory to public key cryptography. Topics include elementary number theory, finite fields, group theory, cryptosystems, and public key cryptography.
    Pre-requisite: Mathematical maturity as demonstrated by any one of the following - at least 12 credits of undergraduate or graduate math courses, or a score of 700 or higher on the math SAT or GRE.
  
  • MAT 709 - Complex Variables

    3 Credit(s) Complex numbers, analytic functions, derivatives and integrals of complex functions, Cauchy integral theorem and formula, Taylor and Laurent series, residues, maximum principles, conformal mapping, families of analytic functions and analytic continuation.
    Pre-requisite: Real Analysis I or the equivalent.
  
  • MAT 710 - Foundations of Mathematics

    3 Credit(s) Suggested topics are: propositional and predicate calculi, consistency and completeness of axiom systems, Godel’s theorem, axiomatic set theory, cardinal and ordinal numbers.
  
  • MAT 711 - Real Analysis I

    3 Credit(s) Completeness, limits, continuity, convergence of sequences and series, derivatives, the Riemann integral, and theorems of Taylor, Bolzano-Weierstrass, and Heine-Borel together with applications.
    Pre-requisite: 12 hours of calculus or the equivalent.
  
  • MAT 712 - Topology I

    3 Credit(s) Topics in analytic, geometric and combinatorial topology, with an emphasis on specific examples. Concepts covered include continuity, separation, compactness, connectedness, matrix spaces and the fundamental group.
    Pre-requisite: MAT 711  or Equivalent
 

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