Apr 17, 2024  
2020-2021 School of Graduate Studies Catalog 
    
2020-2021 School of Graduate Studies Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Graduate Courses


 
  
  • OCT 724 - Introduction to Human Occupation and the Theoretical Constructs of Practice

    3 Credit(s) This introductory course prepares the OT student for acquiring knowledge of the theoretical foundations that support decision-making for occupational therapists in a variety of complex environments. Discussion and analysis of the models, theories and frames of reference in OT practice will be included. In addition, students will learn about humans as occupational beings, the analysis of human occupation, occupational performance and the impact of the environment on occupational endeavors. The OT Practice Framework will be integrated into the course work. Limited to OCT Major.
  
  • OCT 726 - Therapeutic Occupations & Activities

    3 Credit(s) The use of occupation to promote interventions and functional performance is at the core of the occupational therapy profession. This course will explore the meaning and dynamics of occupation and activity from a personal perspective as well as from a treatment perspective. Students will explore the concept of occupation as it supports participation in life using models of practice as well as the OT Practice Framework. Students will expound upon the occupational therapy process while identifying and evaluating occupational performance areas, skills and patterns and view the interwoven relationship of this process to occupational context, client factors, and activity demands. Limited to OCT Major.
    Pre-requisites:  ,   
  
  • OCT 728 - Community Service Practicum

    2 Credit(s) Students will explore the connection of occupational therapy to community-based programming. A focus on health and wellness for clients to integrate their current knowledge and experience within the local community and to develop skills for working with clients and program stakeholders. This course will meet for two lecture hours per week. Limited to OCT Major.
    Pre-requisites:  OCT 726  
  
  • OCT 740 - Level I Fieldwork Seminar

    1 Credit(s) This fieldwork seminar will provide students with practical skills and knowledge for participation in and successful completion of all six fieldwork experiences, supported throughout the program. The course will focus on developing and integrating clinical skills and professional concepts needed for effective fieldwork participation, including review of professional behaviors, observation skills, ethics, and written and verbal communication that fosters competence for entry-level occupational therapy practice. One lecture hour per week. Limited to OCT major
  
  • OCT 771 - Graduate Research & Evidence-Based Practice

    4 Credit(s) OT practitioners will obtain a foundation for research including methodologies, data management, data analysis, outcomes research, IRB submission, and research ethics. Students will critically analyze peer reviewed literature to conduct in dept analyses and synthesize their knowledge. This course will also address the interrelationships between research, evidence-based practice and clinical treatment. Students will formulate a clinical question that will assist them in the development and design of their research thesis.
     
  
  • OCT 792 - Theoretical Principles of OT Practice

    3 Credit(s) This online course will explore current and previously studied theoretical approaches in the field. Students will discern the differences between approaches, frames of references, models of practice, conceptual foundations, grand theories, paradigms, body of knowledge, and multiple theoretical approaches utilized in occupational therapy. This course is designed to teach treatment approaches in today’s diverse practice settings. Limited to OCT post professional master’s students.
    Pre-requisite: OCT 771  
    Co-requisite: OCT 800  
  
  • OCT 793 - Leadership: Theory and Practice

    3 Credit(s) In this course students will develop advanced skills in leadership, management, education and scholarship in order to develop, expand, and evaluate innovative practice opportunities. To accomplish this goal, students must understand and synthesize information from diverse fields including leadership theory, health policy, sociopolitical systems, health and disability, and health policy. Students will integrate knowledge from current health, political and social trends to predict needs and opportunities for the future.
    Pre-requisites:  OCT 972  , OCT 800  
    Co-requisite: OCT 802  
  
  • OCT 798 - Research, Writing and Learning I

    3 Credit(s) This course will develop formal skills in critical inquiry and decision-making. Students will use literature and technology resources to determine interventions based in scientific evidence and best professional practice. Students will conduct literature searches and collect data to answer assessment, descriptive and intervention effectiveness questions. Assisted by faculty, students will formulate a research question, evaluate research articles, and establish an annotated bibliography for the final capstone project. Limited to OCT Major.
    Pre-requisite:    
  
  • OCT 800 - Research, Writing and Learning II

    3 Credit(s) Research II expands the foundation established in prior courses and prepares the occupational therapy student to be an active participant in Health Science Research. A comprehensive understanding of statistics in both application and theory will be addressed. Additional research designs will be examined in a number of areas that impact the present Health Care environment. At the completion of this course students will submit a proposal for their scholarly research project. Limited to OCT Major.
    Pre-requisites:   ,  ,  ,  , or OCT 412, OCT 413, OCT 611, OCT613, or   
     
  
  • OCT 801 - Research Seminar

    2 Credit(s) This seminar will be used to support occupational therapy students who are developing and implementing a research project in OCT 800  and OCT 802  . The seminar is designed to facilitate the development and execution of the occupational therapy capstone research project by providing support from participants and the research advisor. This seminar will provide the occupational therapy student with support specific to their research topic, design and methodology. Limited to OCT major. This course may be taken more than once for credit. This course will meet four times in person over the semester and include a hybrid online component.
  
  • OCT 802 - Research, Writing and Learning III

    3 Credit(s) Research III is the capstone course of the three research modules completing the foundation skills needed to be active participants and contributors to health science research. This course presents advanced topics related to research design and statistics. Students will complete individual research projects and present findings. Limited to OCT Major.
    Pre-requisites: OCT 712 , OCT 715 , OCT 800 , or  ,   
  
  • OCT 804 - Perceptual-Cognitive Disabilities

    3 Credit(s) This course examines occupational theory and treatment techniques associated with children and adults with cognitive-perceptual deficits. Deficits including dyspraxia, visuospatial and visuoconstructive disorders, sensory defensiveness, vestibular problems, and bilateral integration and sequencing problems will be discussed. Theories of brain function, hemispheric specialization, and cognitive-perceptual-motor treatment will be explored. Assessments and remediation strategies for constructional disabilities, sensory integration dysfunction, unilateral neglect and dyspraxia will be integrated. Limited to OCT Major.
    Pre-requisite:   
  
  • OCT 809 - Conditions and Healthcare Environments

    3 Credit(s) This course will focus on the complexities of health conditions commonly seen in occupational therapy practice across the lifespan. Students will explore epidemiology, etiology, signs and symptoms, pathophysiology, psychopathology, and disease course progression. The impact of these conditions on client motivation, body structures and function, occupational performance, and engagement in occupation are explored. Procedures and precautions ensuring safety for patients and caregivers will be reviewed. This course will provide students with an introduction to documentation regulations and associated practice settings in the healthcare industry and issues in reimbursement. Three lecture hours per week. Limited to OCT major.
  
  • OCT 811 - Assistive Technology

    3 Credit(s) This course will provide occupational therapy students an overview of adaptive and assistive technologies. It is designed to provide a basic understanding of various types of technologies, user populations, and environments. Additional topics will be integrated into this course including universal design, funding, legislative policy, and resources. Three lecture hours per week. Limited to OCT Major.
    Pre-requisites:  ,  ,   
  
  • OCT 822 - Civic Advancement and Administration I

    2 Credit(s) This course is designed to develop and enhance the student’s competence to function effectively within any system delivering occupational therapy services. Organization and administration theory will be applied to occupational therapy practice with an emphasis on external and internal influences affecting administrative functions, marketing, communications, supervision, quality assurance, and professional advocacy. Required as prerequisite for and bridge course to occupational therapy master’s degree program. Limited to OCT Major.
    Pre-requisites:     
  
  • OCT 823 - Occupational Therapy Policy and Practice

    2 Credit(s) This is a web-based course that will provide students with a foundation in understanding health care delivery systems and models, legislative and ethical issues and concerns, healthcare policies, and political systems. Corporate, legal and regulatory factors including liability, risk management, and regulation (state practice acts, regulatory and accrediting commissions) will be explored. Students will promote professional advocacy through participating in current state and national lobbying efforts affecting occupational therapy practice. Required as prerequisite for and bridge course to occupational therapy master’s degree program. Limited to OCT Major.
    Pre-requisites:  ,  ,  .
  
  • OCT 850 - Level II Fieldwork and Seminar A

    6 Credit(s) This fieldwork internship and seminar will provide students with practical skills and knowledge for participation in and successful completion of level II fieldwork. Students will complete a 480-hour internship within a chosen clinical setting in conjunction with a fieldwork seminar. Students will discuss and integrate clinical experiences with academic ideologies. Focus of study will include student assessment tools, facility requirements and expectations, and review of concepts pertaining to professionalism that foster competence for entry-level occupational therapy practice. Limited to OCT Majors.
    Pre-requisites: OCT 712 , OCT 715 , OCT 718 , OCT 720 , OCT 800  and OCT 802 .
  
  • OCT 900 - Civic Advancement and Administration II

    2 Credit(s) This course will continue to build upon the fundamental management tools learned in OCT 722 while further developing business administration, marketing and entrepreneurial skills. Students will incorporate their professionally enhanced experiences; develop critical thinking skills, and research interests to create a business plan for an occupational therapy private practice or consulting business. Students will learn the key elements of a business plan. They will also explore opportunities for occupational therapy consultants in emerging practice areas. Limited to OCT Major.
    Pre-requisite:  OCT 850  
  
  • OCT 910 - Trends and Innovative Practice Arenas

    3 Credit(s) This course will prepare students to understand models of service delivery and their effect on the practice of occupational therapy. The advancements in intervention technology in a variety of developing or existing areas of occupational therapy will be discussed and practiced in a laboratory setting. Specialty areas such as low vision and driver rehabilitation, complementary medicine, assistive technology, grant writing, ergonomics and school system inclusion models will be included. Limited to OCT Major.
    Pre-requisites:  OCT 850  OR   
  
  • OCT 912 - Special Topics in Occupational Therapy

    3 Credit(s) This is an optional course that provides comprehensive instruction on special topics in Occupational Therapy. This course is intended to augment intervention skills and competencies for practice within a variety of clinical and community settings. The course content is to be designed by the instructor(s). Topics will vary according to students’ interest and faculty expertise. Instruction may take the form of seminars, conferences, or institutes. This course may occur on the Salem State University campus or at an approved community location. Limited to OCT Majors.
  
  • OCT 915 - Thesis Seminar

    3 Credit(s) This is an optional seminar for the implementation of the student’s research project and involves the completion of data gathering, data analysis, and the preparation and defense of the thesis manuscript. Thesis committee meetings will be attended, and upon written completion of the research outcome, the student will defend the proposal. Signed approval from the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and thesis committee to conduct research from Salem State University or any facility external to Salem State University must be received. This course requires a substantial time commitment. Limited to OCT Majors.
    Pre-requisite: OCT 802 .
  
  • OCT 920 - Capstone Seminar in Professional Practice

    3 Credit(s) The importance of research and evidence-based practice, professional presentation skills, and the promotion of professional advocacy will be components emphasized in this course. Integration of student’s prior clinical experience and the skills attained throughout the curriculum will be reflected upon and discussed. Additionally, skills required to develop new areas of occupational therapy practice and maintain professional development will be highlighted. Limited to OCT Major.
    Pre-requisite:  OCT 850 
     
  
  • OCT 921 - Research Capstone Seminar

    1 Credit(s) This seminar provides students with direction and support for completing individual research capstone projects. Students will participate in discussions and presentations to ensure that progress with research is on-track and that research incorporates appropriate statistical analysis  of data, accurate clinical implications and indications for future research. Competency in professional skills will also be established. Students conference planning meetings and assignment of conference duties will be part of the seminar sessions to ensure the effective and successful execution of the annual OT Student Graduate Research Conference.
    Pre-requisite: OCT 920  
  
  • OCT 925 - Introduction to Interprofessional Practice in Health Care Systems

    3 Credit(s) This course is designed to introduce students to the principles and strategies of interprofessional practice in contemporary health care systems. The course curricula are designed to advance students’ competent practice in interprofessional health care delivery. The course is open to matriculated graduate students in nursing, occupational therapy, and social work as well as to non-matriculated students who hold a baccalaureate degree in one of these disciplines and whose undergraduate GPA is 3.0 or better.
  
  • OCT 960 - Level II Fieldwork and Seminar B

    6 Credit(s) This final level II fieldwork internship and seminar is designed to provide students with practical skills and knowledge for fieldwork and for entry-level practice. Students will complete their second internship (480 clinical hours) within a chosen clinical setting in conjunction with this seminar. Students will examine and discuss concepts learned throughout the curriculum with focus spent on preparation and review for the NBCOT examination, interviewing skills, professionalism, civic and professional responsibilities, advocacy and their role as future leaders. Limited to OCT Major.
    Pre-requisites: OCT 900  , OCT 910 , OCT 920 .  
  
  • OCT 972 - Theoretical Principles of OT Practice

    3 Credit(s) This online course will explore current and previously studied theoretical approaches in the field. Students will discern the differences between approaches, frames of references, models of practice, conceptual foundations, grand theories, paradigms, body of knowledge, and multiple theoretical approaches utilized in occupational therapy. This course is designed to teach students the evolution of OT theory and how theory is most effectively applied to client treatment approaches in today’s diverse practice settings. Limited to OCT post professional master’s students.                                                  
    Pre-requisite:  
    Co-requisite:   
  
  • OCT 973 - Leadership: Theory & Practice

    3 Credit(s) In this course students will develop advanced skills in leadership, management, education and scholarship in order to develop, expand, and evaluate innovative practice opportunities. To accomplish this goal, students must understand and synthesize information from diverse fields including leadership theory, health policy, sociopolitical systems, health and disability, and health policy. Students will integrate knowledge from current health, political and social trends to predict needs and opportunities for the future.
    Pre-requisites:   ,  ,  
    Co-requisite:   
  
  • OCT 974 - Advanced Administration & Management

    3 Credit(s) This interactive online course will explore personal management styles, communication skills, team building activities, and emphasize the principles of program evaluation. Students will incorporate their professionally enhanced experiences; develop critical thinking skills, and research interests to create a business plan for an occupational therapy private practice or consulting business. Students will learn the key elements of a business plan.
    Pre-requisites:  ,  ,  ,  
    Co-requisite:   
  
  • OCT 975 - Thesis Preparation & Presentation

    3 Credit(s) This course requires scholarly writing based on research previously conducted in courses   and   and carried out under the direction of the program advisor. The scholarly writing and professional oral presentation of the research must meet with the approval of the research advisory committee in order to complete all thesis requirements. In addition, students will work together to develop, coordinate and orchestrate the graduate research conference at the conclusion of the semester. Limited to OCT post professional majors.
    Pre-requisites:   ,  ,  ,  ,  ,  ,  ,   
  
  • OCT 980 - Practicum & Online Seminar

    3 Credit(s) This course provides an opportunity to examine and explore a specific area of practice that includes management or education. A 40 hour practicum experience with a mentor and weekly online seminar will include group discussions, problem analysis and in depth reflection that will allow student’s the ability to grow and develop though new experiences. A review of service learning and its integration into OT education will be emphasized in seminar. Limited to OCT post professional majors.
    Pre-requisites:  ,  ,  ,  ,   
  
  • ODS 702 - Computers in Public Organization

    3 Credit(s) This course provides an understanding of the basic functions of information processing in the public sector. The course focuses on the design, selection, evaluation, and use of computers and computer services in public policy studies. It also familiarizes the student with various computer applications using time shared networks and micro-computer applications.
  
  • ODS 710 - Quantitative Analysis

    3 Credit(s) This course focuses on the process of statistical inference whereby the analyst is able to infer or draw conclusions about the parameters of a data set on the basis of statistics derived from samples. Topics include: data organization, graphing and descriptive measures, estimation techniques, hypothesis testing and regression analysis; as applied to the decision making process in business.
     
  
  • ODS 800 - Operations Management

    3 Credit(s) The course deals with concepts and principles related to the conversion process: the inputs of materials, investment, and labor producing finished goods and services. Taught from a management point of view. Topics include product/process design, capacity planning, plant layout, production scheduling, quality control, demand forecasting, human engineering, job design and inventory management. Relationships to other major business functions are explored.
    Prerequisites: Matriculation into the MBA program; completion of all foundation courses or permission of Program Coordinator.
  
  • ODS 801 - Applied Operations Research I

    3 Credit(s) The course deals with the theory and application of management science, to include such topics as simple and complex decision theory, graphical and simplex linear programming, transportation and assignment algorithms, deterministic and stochastic inventory control models, and PERT/CPM network models. Emphasis is placed on problem definition, relevant cost determination, and solution generation, via examination, casework, and computer application.
    Pre-requisite: ODS 710  
  
  • ODS 812 - Service Sector Systems

    3 Credit(s) This course explores the application of operations management to the design and management of service delivery systems. The case method is employed to identify potential uses of factory derived techniques as well as to identify the key issues in evaluation and implementing alternative equipment and processes. Various frameworks for classifying service systems will also be introduced.
    Prerequisite: ODS 800 .
  
  • ODS 840 - Quality and Reliability Systems

    3 Credit(s) This course provides a practical overview of quality and reliability systems in the industrial and service sectors. Topics include concepts and history, acceptance sampling techniques, statistical tolerancing, process control charts, quality assurance, life testing, economics of quality, quality design, Asian quality methods, computer-generated simulation techniques, and the integration of quality and reliability programs and strategies.
    Pre-requisites: ODS 710  and ODS 800 .
  
  • ODS 850 - Management Information Systems II

    3 Credit(s) This course embraces two major topics. The first is an introduction to the database approach for design of integrated information applications. It covers data base design, data structures, data definition and manipulation languages, and data base implementation and evaluation. The second is advanced systems management. It covers personnel career planning and turnover, capacity planning, standards development, software conversion problems and disaster recovery.
  
  • PHL 703 - Personal and Social Ethics

    3 Credit(s) An inquiry into the major theories in Moral Philosophy. A sample of issues to be discussed is: Sexual Morality, Censorship, AIDS, Abortion and Fetal Research, Suicide and Euthanasia, The Death Penalty, Discrimination and Population Control, and Economic Injustice.
  
  • PHL 704 - Nonviolence: Theory and Practice

    3 Credit(s) This course will explore and analyze the concept of conflict resolution through nonviolence from various perspectives. Readings include works by the past practitioners of nonviolence- Mohandas K. Gandhi, Henry David Thoreau and Martin Luther King, Jr., as well as contemporary practitioners like Dalai Lama, Plowshares Eight and others.
  
  • PHL 705 - Professional Ethics & Sport Leadership

    3 Credit(s) An inquiry into ethical theories of leadership with special emphasis upon the ethics of sports leadership. There is a dual focus upon classical ethical theory and contemporary professional ethics. Challenges faced by leaders in sport will be addressed through an examination of styles of ethical leadership. Students will learn to construct, evaluate, and critically assess moral arguments through case study analysis of current ethical dilemmas in the field of sport.
  
  • PHL 875 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a member of the Philosophy Department.
  
  • PHL 876 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a member of the Philosophy Department.
  
  • PHS 701 - Physics and its Applications for Middle School Teachers

    3 Credit(s) This course includes topics that show how physics affects our lives. The first few topics use forces. The second set of topics include one type of energy or another and then the final topics are on light and sound. Throughout the course there are several topics that are closely related to engineering. Assignments and in class projects will help the student gain a deeper understanding of physics in our lives. News reports will be discussed in class. The students will prepare lesson plans that they will use in their classrooms. Thesis topics will be investigated.
    Pre-requisites: An Introductory Physics course or the equivalent and admittance into the MAT in Middle School General Science program or the permission of the Instructor.
  
  • POL 721 - Public Administration

    3 Credit(s) This course examines theoretical and practical aspects of public administration. Topics include the structure of government, functions of agencies, organizational theories and problems, decision-making, public employees, accountability and the budgetary process. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between public administration, politics and policy implementation.
  
  • POL 722 - Public Policy Theory and Analysis

    3 Credit(s) The course introduces students to a variety of theoretical approaches for analyzing the policy process and tools for evacuating policy alternatives. Through in-depth research in policy areas of interest to them, students will gain skills in policy analysis and familiarity with policy research resources, including laws, regulations, legislation,and public records of interest group activity. During the course, students will complete a policy analysis case study and a policy memo,
  
  • POL 760 - Global Policy Analysis

    3 Credit(s) This course provides the tools for identifying and defining global challenges and providing insightful analysis of policy solutions. With a focus on larger trends of globalized/interdependent economics and the associated delicate nature of security, from classic defense-oriented security to environmental and resource oriented security, this course uses policy stages, or the idea of a definite policy process as an underlying conceptual tool. Through this, this course seeks to outline how we can better identify global challenges and offer pragmatic and humane solutions.
  
  • POL 761 - Global Institutions and Policy

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the ever-changing structures, processes, and outcomes of global governance and policy. Keeping in mind the increasing interconnectedness of global society, it also endeavors to understand the global community as well as the overlapping networks of formal and informal international institutions and actors on the global stage. The underlying assumption of the course is that how we understand the role of these elements, and where they fit into particular issue spheres, is central to meeting the greatest challenges of the 21st century. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • POL 772 - Comparative Political Development

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the challenges of state and nation-building in developing countries and explores the complex relations between governance, socio-economic development, and political stability. Topics include political institutionalization, democracy, political transition, foreign aid, democracy promotion, state failure, corruption, patrimonialism, and civil conflicts. The ability of civil society and the international community in promoting regime change and good governance is also discussed. Three lecture hours per week.
  
  • POL 900 - Directed Study in Political Science

    3 Credit(s) An independent in-depth research and/or writing project supervised by a faculty member of the Political Science Department on a topic not covered by any POL graduate course. Three lecture hours per week. May be repeated once for a total of six credits, and two enrollments in the same semester is allowed.
  
  • POL 920 - Internship in Policy and Politics

    3 Credit(s) The purpose of POL 920 Internship in Policy and Politics is to help students obtain professional experience in the area of global policy through field involvement. Relevant placement sites include, nonprofit, international organizations, governmental offices, think tanks, and foundations engaged in international work. Students will work closely with a faculty advisor for the duration of their internship and will reflect on their experience in a comprehensive final report. Ten internship hours per week.
  
  • PSY 700 - Research Methods in Psychology

    3 Credit(s) This course introduces the student to procedures and techniques in conducting psychological research including statistical procedures used in describing and analyzing data. It enables the student to interpret research extracted from psychological journals.
    Pre-requisite: Statistics and Experimentation I or equivalent.
  
  • PSY 701 - Perspectives on Adulthood and Old Age

    3 Credit(s) The process of maturation from young adulthood to old age. Emphasis is on the relevance of physiological, psychological and social factors during this period of development.
  
  • PSY 705 - Human Development Across the Lifespan

    3 Credit(s) This course will examine physical, behavioral, cognitive, socio-emotional and moral development from conception until death. Examining a diverse set of cultures and subcultures, development will be understood in terms of major theoretical perspectives and of relevant research. Applications of developmental knowledge to understanding and working with typically and non-typically developing individuals will be included.
  
  • PSY 715 - Behavioral Principles of Learning

    3 Credit(s) This course provides a background for understanding the relationship between experimental and applied behavioral work, and deals with basic and selected topics in respondent and operant conditioning of human and animal behavior. Special emphasis is given to definitions, characteristics, principles, processes and concepts in experimental and applied behavior analysis. Also covered are ethical considerations in human and animal research, and the measurement, display, and interpretation of data.
  
  • PSY 720 - Theories of Personality

    3 Credit(s) This course provides the student with an in-depth analysis of historical and contemporary models of personality. Students are required to develop an eclectic system which they can use in understanding human behavior. Emphasis will be placed on systems which are dynamic, interactional, and developmental.
  
  • PSY 725 - Applied Behavior Analysis I

    3 Credit(s) This course deals with the application of basic behavior analytic methods, and introduces the student to intervention strategies in a variety of settings. Topics include behavioral measurement and interpretation of intervention data, ethical considerations, and translating experimental research into applied work.
  
  • PSY 726 - Applied Behavior Analysis II

    3 Credit(s) This course is a continuation of   Applied Behavior Analysis I, and introduces more complex intervention strategies for changing behavior in various settings. There will be an emphasis on ethical considerations, experimental evaluation of interventions, and functional assessment and selection of appropriate intervention strategies.
    Pre-requisite:   
  
  • PSY 727 - Exam Preparation in Behavior Analysis

    1.5 Credit(s) The content of the course will vary according to current BACB® examination tasks lists and incoming pre-test performance of students enrolled in the course. Students are expected to become familiar with their strengths and weaknesses in the content areas and to develop plans for self-study. Progress is evaluated based on pre- and post-tests. May be taken more than once, but only counts toward program credits once.
     
  
  • PSY 730N - Advanced Study of Abnormal Psychology

    3 Credit(s) Abnormal Psychology is designed to cover the various forms of abnormal behavior. The course will cover etiology, development and treatment of major psychological disorders. Students will be expected to develop an awareness and sensitivity to human reactions to frustration, stress and resultant symptom formation.
  
  • PSY 731 - Counseling Theory and Practice I

    3 Credit(s) This course includes the theory and practice of counseling. It examines the helping relationship, the historical development of counseling, the characteristics and concerns of counselors and the goals of counseling as well as the basic approaches toward counseling, diagnosis and referral procedures. Ethical and legal considerations are discussed.
  
  • PSY 732 - Counseling Theory and Practice II

    3 Credit(s) Each student is expected, through counseling-related required readings, lectures and discussion of various theories of counseling and psychotherapy, group and individual counseling presentations, counseling role playing sessions, critiqued video and audio taped counseling sessions, case studies involvement, to refine and to further develop his/her own counseling style.
    Pre-requisite: PSY 731  
  
  • PSY 733 - Principles of Psychological Testing

    3 Credit(s) This course is offered for both teachers and counselors. The aim of the course is to introduce the basic principles of psychological testing and to study, in depth, the most commonly used instruments for assessing intelligence, achievement, aptitude, interest, and personality.
    Pre-requisite: Measurement and Evaluation or equivalent.
  
  • PSY 734N - Community Counseling in a Multicultural and Diverse Society

    3 Credit(s) The focus is on non-traditional approaches to helping others. The course includes the development of skills in areas such as consultation, crisis intervention, and the assessment and development of community resources. It is recommended for students interested in employment in educational institutions, mental health facilities, human services agencies and rehabilitation settings.
  
  • PSY 735 - Philosophical Foundations of Psychology

    3 Credit(s) This course covers the historical underpinnings of, and current developments in, the systems of thought in psychology: Psychoanalytic, Behavioral, Humanistic, and Cognitive. In addition, current interdisciplinary developments are discussed as they relate to areas to produce biological and physiological emphases in psychology.
  
  • PSY 736N - Behavioral and Cognitive Behavioral Therapies

    3 Credit(s) This course will introduce students to the history, philosophy and conceptual model of cognitive behavioral therapy, and address the practice issues revolving around models of treatment, standards of care and the importance of empirically validated treatment. Students will learn basic intervention strategies, for example, relaxation training, cognitive restructuring, brief/graduated exposure therapy, and several others.
  
  • PSY 737 - Nature of Adolescence

    3 Credit(s) This course exposes the student to a variety of broad-based (e.g., Freud, Erikson, Piaget) and more narrowly defined theories concerning adolescent development. Empirical studies are covered in relation to these theories as well as to the further understanding of adolescence.
  
  • PSY 738 - Child Development and Public Policy

    3 Credit(s) This course covers both the interrelationship between agencies of socialization and the laws and policies of government, and the overall effects on child development and education. Topics include day care, early education intervention programs, family and child rights, and child health.
  
  • PSY 739 - Developmental Psychopathology

    3 Credit(s) This course stresses the abnormal-deviant, pathological, and maladaptive - influences on human development and compares various forms of intervention. Attention will be paid to theoretical approaches to psychopathology such as psychoanalytic, learning, and behavioral therapies. Specific types of interventions such as pharmacotherapies, nondirective play therapy, conjoint family therapy, and multimodal types are included.
  
  • PSY 740 - Differential Diagnosis

    3 Credit(s) This course presents the student with an understanding of the current classificatory system used in the field of clinical psychology. It is intended to develop competence in the diagnosis of personality disorders with a focus on the overlap of diagnostic categories.
    Pre-requisite: Either PSY 730N  or PSY 739 .
  
  • PSY 741 - Group Counseling

    3 Credit(s) This course assists counselors/educators to meet the needs of youth through group procedures. Basic principles, research, and types of organizational procedures for group activities are analyzed. Opportunities exist for class members to observe their own behavior and that of others through role playing, video taping, and group exercise.
  
  • PSY 743 - Contemporary Families

    3 Credit(s) Traditional definitions of the family may have restricted the practice of marriage/couples/family counseling. As is well known, the nuclear family is now in the minority. By exploring historical, biological and cross-cultural evidence on families, this course will “put the family into perspective.” The course will examine the many different forms that families can take, with a particular goal of exploring which aspects of families help the individuals in them to thrive.
  
  • PSY 744 - Interpersonal Relationships

    3 Credit(s) Using Erikson’s sixth stage (intimacy vs. isolation) as a theoretical framework, this course will present recent and extensive research about the various forms of interpersonal relationships likely to be encountered in marriage/couples or family counseling. Specialized topics, such as multicultural differences, historical changes, love and sexuality, social networks, and power, conflict and violence in interpersonal relationships, will be covered.
  
  • PSY 745 - Gender and Human Sexuality

    3 Credit(s) This course will address issues related to gender and human sexuality that are likely to be encountered in marriage/couples or family counseling. Development of and changes in sexual identity, gender identity and sexual orientation throughout the life span will be covered. Specialized topics will include sexual dysfunction, enhancing and limiting fertility, abortion and sexual coercion. Gender and sexual expression will be considered in multicultural as well as historic contexts.
  
  • PSY 757N - Marital/Couples and Family Counseling

    3 Credit(s) The course is designed for teachers, guidance counselors, nurses, marriage/couples and family therapists. The course will include an overview of family systems, communications dynamics and practical skills for coping with life situations in contemporary family systems. Theoretical approaches will be reinforced through case history procedures stressing child rearing practices.
  
  • PSY 758B - Marital/Couples and Family Psychotherapy

    3 Credit(s) The basic concept and techniques of family therapy are examined. The course focuses on problem identification assessment, stages of therapy and counseling strategies. Techniques of family therapy are presented which are practiced through role playing and case studies.
    Pre-requisite: PSY 757N  
  
  • PSY 777R - Legal and Ethical Issues in the Human Services Profession

    3 Credit(s) This course reviews legal and ethical issues regarding the practice of human services professionals. Specific topics related to the interaction of the law with mental health, marriage/couples, family and rehabilitation counseling are discussed.
  
  • PSY 780N - Industrial/Organizational Psychology

    3 Credit(s) This course presents an overview of the field, including the study of selection, placement, training and development, performance measurement and evaluation, job/task analysis, work satisfaction and motivation, supervision leadership and behavioral management, and job workplace design. The techniques used by the industrial psychologist are emphasized.
    Pre-requisites: General or Introductory Psychology and a course dealing with statistics or test and measurement.
  
  • PSY 781 - Personnel Selection and Placement

    3 Credit(s) This course studies the procedures used in recruiting, identifying, selecting and placing people in jobs where they have the best chance for success. The measurement and identification of job performance knowledge, skills and abilities are covered. Both theoretical and practical considerations are emphasized.
    Pre-requisitePSY 786  
  
  • PSY 782 - Work Motivation, Job Satisfaction and Task Design

    3 Credit(s) Work motivation and job satisfaction are stressed in relation to such practical issues as work behavior, absenteeism, and turnover. Techniques to measure motivation and satisfaction are presented and evaluated. Physical and task environment variables and their interaction with work motivation and satisfaction are emphasized.
  
  • PSY 783 - Training and Development in Organization

    3 Credit(s) This course covers the theory, principles, and practices in the field of training and development in organization. The Instructional Systems Development (ISD) approach is presented as a model for the logical sequence of steps in the development of training programs. Other topics include scientifically based training principles, task and person analysis, and legal issues.
  
  • PSY 784 - Measurement and Appraisal of Work Behavior

    3 Credit(s) The student is presented with: the various statistical and psychometric considerations in behavior measurement; job/task analysis techniques, the procedures for identifying and developing job performance criteria measures; and techniques to integrate these fundamental steps into a formal appraisal and review system.
  
  • PSY 785 - Research in Organizations

    3 Credit(s) This course focuses on the application of basic psychological research procedures and techniques to Industrial/Organizational Psychology. There will be specific consideration of research topics related to human resources, organizational development and program evaluation. Students will design and conduct research projects relevant to organizational goals.
    Pre-requisites: PSY 786  and   
  
  • PSY 786 - Statistics and Data Analysis For I/O Psychology

    3 Credit(s) This course presents statistics used by I/O psychologists including measures of central tendency and variability, sampling distributions, differences between means, univariate ANOVA, linear regression, correlation, and multiple regression. Students will become familiar with multivariate ANOVA, nonlinear regression, and correlation, path and factor analysis, meta-analysis, and causal modeling. Students will use a major statistical software package.
  
  • PSY 787 - Psychology of Organizational Development Consulting

    3 Credit(s) This course provides an overview of the psychologist’s role as a consultant in the organizational change process. Students will learn the history and theory of organizational consulting, what organizational psychologists do when consulting and how they do it. Specific topics will include organizational problem diagnosis, intervention planning, consulting strategies, change process implementation and intervention evaluation.
  
  • PSY 788 - Social Psychology

    3 Credit(s) This course examines how people think, act, and interact with each other in diverse social situations. Topics will include social cognition, attitude structure and change, prosocial behavior, aggression, prejudice and stereotyping, social influence, group processes and intergroup relations, social neuroscience, and cultural and evolutionary social psychology. The course will focus on both the empirical research and the theoretical frameworks of social psychology. Practical applications of social psychology will also be considered.
  
  • PSY 789 - Environmental Psychology

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the psychological connections between people and the built and natural environment. Topics will include environmental perception, cognition, and attitudes; natural and built environments; personal space, territoriality, place attachment, crowding, and density; climate and weather; sustainability; and environmental design. The course will focus on both historical as well as emerging trends in the field.
  
  • PSY 790 - Psychometrics

    3 Credit(s) This course will introduce students to psychometric theory, research, and methods that provide the basic skills necessary to construct, evaluate, and interpret psychological tests. Test applications will also be covered. Classical test theory views of reliability, item analysis, validity, and test development principles will be included. Moreover, modern approaches to test theory, including item response theory and generalizability theory, will be examined.
    Pre-requisite: PSY 786  
  
  • PSY 791 - Organizational Psychology

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the complicated systems of individual and group psychological processes in organizations. The impact of the organization on the individual and on groups of individuals is emphasized. The course investigates the relationship between organizational psychology theories and organizational development practices. Specific topics include theories of leadership in organizations, group processes, work motivation and job satisfaction. Particular emphasis will be placed on contemporary issues involving modern organizations.
  
  • PSY 817 - Experimental Analysis of Behavior

    3 Credit(s) Students will develop a practical understanding of the principles and procedures within the experimental analysis of behavior. Topics will include schedules of reinforcement, stimulus control, conditioned reinforcement, choice, and establishing/abolishing operations. Students will complete online or in-person labs, read relevant primary research articles, and prepare a final experimental project proposal that is developed in consultation with the instructor.
     
  
  • PSY 820 - Theory and Treatment of Substance Abuse Disorders

    3 Credit(s) This course introduces substance abuse theories, research, and treatment. Using a biopsychosocial perspective, students will learn the physiological and psychological effects of alcohol and other drugs, and the effects of substance abuse on individuals, families and communities. Current treatments considered effective for different populations will be discussed.
    Pre-requisites: PSY 731  and PSY 740 , or permission from the Instructor.
  
  • PSY 825 - Behavioral Assessment

    3 Credit(s) This course provides an in-depth examination of how to conduct functional behavioral assessments as a necessary and integral component of three interrelated processes in applied behavior analysis: problem identification, program design, and outcome evaluation. Case studies will be used throughout the course.
  
  • PSY 830 - Small N Research Design & Analysis

    3 Credit(s) This course provides an overview of the research methods particular to experimental and applied behavior analysis. Small N research designs are emphasized and compared with case studies and group designs. Special emphasis will be on the measurement of behavior, displaying behavioral data, and interpreting behavioral data. Additional topics will include ethical considerations in behavioral research and applications, as well as experimental evaluation of interventions.

     
  
  • PSY 840 - Legal, Ethical, and Professional Issues in Applied Behavioral Analysis

    3 Credit(s) This course deals with the legal, ethical and professional issues that arise in the career of a behavior analyst. Topics include appropriately identifying functional relations, selecting targets for change, deciding when to implement behavior change procedures, evaluating the outcomes and kinds of interventions, and considerations in working with human and non-human populations. All course topics will be considered with respect to laws, professional codes of ethics and cultural competencies that are relevant and specific to behavior analysts.
  
  • PSY 842 - Conceptual Issues in Behavior Analysis

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the conceptual underpinning of behaviorism, the philosophy underlying behavior analysis. The readings will focus on the writings of prominent behavior analysts as primary sources or will be organized around a specific theme in the field (e.g., private events, phylogeny and ontogeny, cultural design, verbal behavior, etc.). The topic will be announced in advance.
    Pre-requisites: At least one of   or  , or permission of the coordinator.
  
  • PSY 845 - Organizational Behavior and Supervision in Behavior Analysis

    3 Credit(s) This course examines major theories, research, and practice in the fields of Organizational Behavior Management (OBM), also called Performance Management (PM). By considering real world application to organizational situations, topics are covered from a behavior analytic viewpoint. Topics may include: motivation, work attitudes (e.g., job satisfaction, organizational commitment, etc). perception, decision-making, diversity, leadership, working in groups and teams, and individual differences. Particular emphasis will be on how to understand human behavior in the context of OBM and PM theories to meet goals of both the individual and organizations. In addition, at least 8 hours will be directly related to supervision of applied behavior analysts in ABA-related settings. Three lecture hours per week.
    Pre-requisites:  At least 21 credits completed in behavior analysis graduate courses, or permission of the coordinator.
  
  • PSY 875 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a faculty member of the Psychology Department.
  
  • PSY 876 - Directed Study

    3 Credit(s) An independent research project supervised by a faculty member of the Psychology Department.
  
  • PSY 877 - Psychopharmacology

    3 Credit(s) This course examines the use of psychopharmacological agents in the treatment of psychological disorders. The indications, usage, positive behavioral effects and adverse effects of psychoactive drugs will be explored. Particular emphasis will be placed on diagnostic, behavioral and epidemiological considerations of psychological disorders.
    Pre-requisite: PSY 740  preferred, or either PSY 730N  or PSY 739 .
  
  • PSY 878 - The Psychology of Small Group Leadership

    3 Credit(s) This course will focus on assisting professionals to develop small group leadership skills. The psychological principles of small group leadership will be analyzed and related research will be reviewed. Class members will lead, participate, and process small group simulations and role plays to develop a personal orientation to small group leadership that integrates psychological theory and experiential learning.
  
  • PSY 899 - Psychology Masters Thesis I

    3 Credit(s) In this course, the student develops a thesis proposal that requires a plan for empirical research on a significant psychological question related to the student’s program of study. The proposal is developed under the supervision of a faculty member and thesis committee.
    Pre-requisites: Final year of Masters program, minimum 3.5 GPA in courses or invitation by a faculty sponsor, and approval in writing by both the Faculty sponsor and the program coordinator. Required for students pursuing the thesis option.
 

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