Oct 19, 2021  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

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History

  
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    HST 300 Introduction to Museum Work

    3 Credit(s)
    Using regional museums, this course focuses on relevant topics intended to introduce the student to the place of museums in society and education. Various facets of museum operation will be highlighted. Attention will be given to career opportunities existing in museum work. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS375.
  
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    HST 301 Introduction to Archeology

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    An introduction to the theory, methods, and goals of archaeology in the Old and New Worlds. Topics include the history of the discipline, excavation and the interpretation of archaeological remains, the uses of documents, dating techniques, and the examination of several Old and New World cultures. Three lecture hours per week. Offered annually. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS376.
  
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    HST 305 Topics in Public History

    3 Credit(s) 3
    This course features intensive examination of a specialized topic in public history.  It emphasizes readings that reflect fresh trends in research strategies or interpretive directions.  The professor will determine selection of the course topic.  There may be field trips associated with this course.  Three lecture hours per week.  This course can be repeated for credit.
  
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    HST 306 United States Cultural and Social History

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Examines the nation’s cultural and social development. The interaction of settlers with old world background, the influence of the frontier, the emphasis on education, varying religious inheritance, the impact of industrialization, and the advances made in the arts, crafts and sciences will be studied in terms of their contribution to the uniqueness of American culture. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS313.
  
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    HST 307 American Colonial History

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Stresses the development of the 13 English colonies to 1776. Topics will include the French settlements in Canada; the colonial wars; the Spanish settlements in the South; and the independence movement in the English colonies. The New England colonies will receive particular emphasis. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS314.
  
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    HST 309 Depression & World War in U.S. History

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    A survey of American economic, social, intellectual, diplomatic, military, and political developments during the period from 1900 to 1945. Topics include Progressiveness, world war, Jim Crow racism, women’s suffrage, labor and industrialization, the stock market, the Great Depression, and the New Deal.  Elective for Peace Studies Minor. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS317A.
  
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    HST 310 Development of the American Constitution

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    A case study analysis of the history of American constitutional law. The course encompasses significant events and court cases from the American Revolution to the present. Special attention is given to the role of the U.S. Supreme Court and to significant developments in Massachusetts constitutional history. Three lecture hours per week. Fulfills Massachusetts’s teacher certification American Government requirement. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS319.
  
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    HST 311 Historical Heritage of the North Shore

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    An historical investigation of Massachusetts’ North Shore during the most critical periods of national history. Particular interest is focused on the unique experiences of the various towns and cities. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS320.
  
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    HST 313 New England Heritage

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    A focused historical investigation of New England from its settlement to the present. Factors accounting for the uniqueness of the region will be stressed, as will the similarities and differences among the states. The place of the region in the social and cultural history of the nation will be highlighted. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS322.
  
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    HST 314 Postwar America: 1945 to the Present

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    A survey of American economic, social, intellectual, diplomatic, military and political developments since 1945.  Topics include atomic diplomacy, the Cold War, civil rights, women’s liberation, ecology, the culture of consumption, suburbanization, presidential politics, and the role of the United States in world affairs.  Elective for Peace Studies minor.  Three hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS323A.
  
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    HST 315 Civil War and Reconstruction

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Analysis of the period 1787-1877, focusing on the causes, course and consequences of the American Civil War. Notes changing historical interpretations of social, economic, political and military events. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS324.
  
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    HST 317 History of Native North Americans

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    A chronological survey of the history of native North American Indians, emphasizing their first contact with Europeans to the present. Special attention will be focused on their unique social, cultural and religious diversity. Extensive collateral reading. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS329.
  
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    HST 318 Era of the American Revolution

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Examines the causes and development of the American Revolution. Beginning with an analysis of the political culture of the British North American colonies and the imperial structure, it traces the strains, which emerged between the imperial center and colonial peripheries. State and federal constitution making during the “Critical Period” and post-revolutionary development will be considered. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS343.
  
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    HST 319 American Transportation History

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Analysis of the development of various modes of transport from the colonial period to the present. Major emphasis on the post-Civil War Period controversies involving government regulation and subsidization. Special consideration given to the impact of transportation on American culture. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS353.
  
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    HST 320 History of the American Family

    3 Credit(s)
    This course traces the roots of the American family from colonial time to the present. Early patterns of character from Europe, Africa, and Asia will be examined. Major treatment of the changing nature of society will shed light on the modern American family of today. Students will have the opportunity to develop the skills necessary to explore their own family genealogy. The course will feature guest speakers, films, and related field trips. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS354.
  
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    HST 324 Window to the Past: Introduction to Oral History

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    An introduction to the methodology of oral history and its relationship to contemporary historical investigation. Students will develop technical mastery through classroom presentation and by conducting interviews with individuals who are knowledgeable about the topic under investigation. Interviews will be deposited in an appropriate historical archive. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS360.
  
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    HST 325 Topics in Religion and History

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    The course studies different topics regarding the interactions between religion and history in different semesters. Study subjects may include Eastern and Western religions such as Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Judaism, Islam, and Taoism. Using an historical approach, the course examines their religious myths, sacred texts, and popular rituals to reach a better understanding of these religions’ social implications. The course can be repeated with permission of the Department Chairperson. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS355A.
  
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    HST 326 Museum Education

    3 Credit(s)
    Drawing on literature from the fields of history and education, this course will offer an overview of the field of museum education. Particular focus will be given to the educational role of museums, the specifics of museum learning, exhibit design, and the use of technology. This course may contain a field work component with a local museum. Students may not complete both HST326 and EDU326E for credit. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 330 New England Puritanism

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course examines the history of Puritanism in New England.  Topics include European background of Puritan belief and practice, the establishment of New England, Puritan adaptation of New England environment, interactions with Native American peoples, the evolution of congregational practice, political and economic development, family, and print culture.
  
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    HST 331 American Film History

    3 Credit(s)
    This course in public history examines some of the various ways in which the American Experience has been represented in the public sphere.  It examines the role of film in creating mythologies, in reflecting the times in which they are produced, and compares these popular representations against historians’ interpretations.
  
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    HST 332 Architectural History of America: An Introduction

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    An overview of the built environment in the United States from colonial settlement to late 19th century. The course will examine how buildings related to American history. Emphasis is placed on the architecture of New England. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS377.
  
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    HST 333 American Material Culture: An Introduction

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course covers the identification, classification, and interpretation of the artifacts and decorative arts of America. Particular attention will be paid to artifacts produced before 1860, and to how these objects are interpreted by archaeologists, historians and museum professionals. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS378.
  
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    HST 345 African Americans in the Jazz Age 1919-1941

    3 Credit(s) DIII V
    This course examines the development and social construction of black America during the Interwar Period with emphasis on black cultural production, social thought, political protest, and community development. Attention is given to the ways black Americans have been active historical agents in their creation and United States History. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS383.
  
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    HST 346 African American Freedom Struggles 1941-present

    3 Credit(s) DIII V
    This course traces black Americans’ struggle for equality since the 1930’s with emphasis on the post-World War II period. It focuses on the individuals and social trends that laid the groundwork for change by the mid twentieth century. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS384.
  
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    HST 360 Topics in American History

    3 Credit(s)
    The course features intensive examination of a specialized topic in American History. It emphasizes readings that reflect fresh trends in research strategies or interpretive directions. The professor will determine selection of the course topic. Three lecture hours per week. This course may be repeated for additional credits.
  
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    HST 365 Problems in American History

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Deals with the changing patterns of historical interpretation of major phenomena in the nation’s past. Serving as an introduction to historiography, the course, using the most relevant case material available, examines opposing points of view, the nature of new evidence, and challenges to traditional viewpoints. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS311.
  
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    HST 372 History of Islamic Civilization

    3 Credit(s) DIII V
    This course is an introduction to Islamic Civilization, from the 6th Century to the present. It focuses upon Islam as a religion, the creation of the Islamic community, and the political, social, cultural, and economic structures of the central Islamic kingdoms from Iran to North Africa. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS398.
  
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    HST 373 Europe and the Atlantic, 1400-1800

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course examines the discovery, conquest, and colonization of coastal Africa and the western hemisphere by Europeans in the early modern era. Recent historical literature concerning the “discovery era” and its impact will be incorporated. Regional and comparative approaches will emphasize the development of a distinctive Atlantic economy and diverse colonial societies. Particular emphasis will be placed on trans-Atlantic trade, including the slave trade, and colonial competition and warfare. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS362.
  
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    HST 374 A History of Slavery and Labor Migration in West Africa

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course examines the social and political factors which gave rise to slavery in West Africa and the relationship of the internal slave trade with the external one. It also analyzes the emergence of free labor and its subsequent transformation under the impact of urbanization. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS364.
  
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    HST 375 Gender in East Asian History

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    The course concentrates on the gender relationships in East Asia. Asian women’s search for personal freedom was a constant battle because traditional societies greatly suppressed their choices. The course examines Asian women’s sufferings, their struggles against the existing social order, their successes and failures, and the ways in which Asian women’s pursuit of their rights finally led to their widened participation in social and political affairs. Three lecture hours per week. Not open for students who have received credits for HIS365or HIS365A.
  
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    HST 376 History of South Africa

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course explores South Africa’s history from early man to the post-apartheid period. Its focus is the origins and development of the ideology and practice of segregation and the internal and external factors contributing to feelings of racial superiority and exclusiveness. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS368.
  
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    HST 377 East Africa: the Past As Present

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course seeks to provide an introduction to the history of East Africa, principally the modern states of Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania. Special attention will be devoted to issues of multi-cultural contacts at frontiers of exchange, involvement in the modern world system, imperialism and neo-colonialism. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS369.
  
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    HST 378 History of Central America

    3 Credit(s) DIII V
    This course examines the history of Central America from the conquest through the twenty-first century. Topics include indigenous populations, conquest, colonization, independence, race, ethnicity and national identity in the nineteenth century, the history of U.S. influence in the region, the history of social movements, protest, revolution and migration; the tenuous peace, globalization and continuing social unrest in the twenty-first century. Focus on El Salvador, Guatemala and Nicaragua. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS379A.
  
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    HST 382 The Pacific War, 1931-1945

    3 Credit(s) DIII V
    The course focuses on the Pacific War in Asia, an important but often neglected part of the Second World War. It tries to answer some lingering questions. What were the Japanese motivations and justifications? What were the Japanese and Chinese experiences in the war? How did the war change the Asian-Pacific region? The course includes many new materials to inspire the students to rethink the war critically. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS386.
  
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    HST 384 History of United States-East Asian Relations

    3 Credit(s) DIII V
    The course examines key issues in the United States-East Asian relations, including American trade with China, Matthew Perry’s mission to Japan, the Open Door policy, immigration, the Pacific War, and post-Cold War economic exchanges. The course explains policy initiatives of East Asian countries, as well as the U.S. role in the Pacific. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS388.
  
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    hst 388 Votes for Women: The British Women’s Suffrage Movement, 1860 - 1928

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This class examines the British suffrage movement approximately 1860 - 1928.  It considers the arguments put forward by those who supported and those who were opposed to votes for women.  It introduces the key figures and the key organizations involved in the women’s suffrage movement and analyzes the various ways in which women and men campaigned for the vote.  Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 389 India and the World

    3 Credit(s)
    This course offers an introduction to the history of India’s connections to the modern world. India has been connected to and often at the center of global networks of commerce, culture, migration, politics, colonialism, war and environmental challenges (monsoons and tsunamis) throughout modern history. Through a variety of historical sources and themes, this course studies the movement of people, goods, and ideas in and out of Indian sub-continent that historically linked the region to the world since the modern era. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 390 The Jewel in the Crown: India and the British Empire

    3 Credit(s)
    Once called the jewel in Britain’s crown, India was one of the most important colonies in the British Empire since the late eighteenth century. This course offers an introduction to the political, economic, social and cultural history of British colonialism in India, 1765-1947. It also explores the history and historical debates over the relationship between colonialism and Indian nationalism as it emerged in the late nineteenth century and developed under the leadership of Mohandas Gandhi. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 432 English Constitutional History

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Surveys the nature and development of the English constitution since the pre-Norman era. Examines the evolving relationships between legal and political thought and practice and the accompanying evolution of legal and political institutions. Three lecture hours per week. Offered in alternate years. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS373.
  
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    HST 433 The First World War and European Culture

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Examines the intellectual, cultural, and social impact of the First World War on Europe. Explores the prewar atmosphere of Europe, the long-term and immediate causes of war, the multiple experiences of combatants and noncombatants during the war, and the social, literary, and cultural movements and ideas emerging from these wartime experiences. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS315.
  
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    HST 438 Europe in the Age of Enlightenment

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course examines the history of Europe from the Glorious Revolution to the French Revolution, considering in particular the critique of Old Regime Europe offered by the Enlightenment. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS372.
  
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    HST 439 The French Revolution and Napoleon, 1789-1815

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will examine the history of the French Revolution and Napoleonic Era in France, considering as well the effects of both on their European and world contexts. Offered bi-annually. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS374.
  
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    HST 440 European History 1815-1914

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course covers the history of Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the summer crisis of 1914, with emphasis on such developments as the Industrial Revolution, the growth of liberalism and democracy, socialism, nationalism, and the nationalistic and economic rivalries of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Elective for Peace Studies minor. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS308A.
  
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    HST 442 World War II in Europe

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course examines the diplomatic, military, political, social and cultural dimensions of World War II in Europe. It analyzes the origins, events and outcomes of the war in Europe and explores how this central twentieth century event transformed Europe’s diverse peoples, its identity and its place in the world. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS352.
  
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    HST 444 A Generation in Revolt: Transnational History of the 1960’s

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Examines the intellectual, cultural, and social history of the decade of the 1960’s in a comparative context. Focusing primarily on Europe and the United States, but referencing other world areas, the course explores the roots of the sixties rebellion, the political, social and cultural dimensions of its counterculture, the conservative response to radical change and the broader impact of the 1960’s on contemporary ideas, politics, society and culture. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS382.
  
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    HST 445 Magic and Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course examines the origins, characteristics, and end of the “witch craze” of sixteenth and seventeenth-century Europe. The course will set the witch craze in its widest historical context by examining the religious, social, intellectual, economic, demographic, and political trends of the period, as well as the general roles played by magic and superstition in early modern society. Particular emphasis will be placed on the role of the Reformation in intensifying the witch craze and the Scientific Revolution in bringing about the “decline of magic”. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS361.
  
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    HST 446 Art, Science and Technology in Renaissance Europe

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    The course examines the integrated world of art, science and technology during the European Renaissance, c. 1350-1650. Individual artists and scientists will be examined, within the broader historical contexts of the Renaissance and the Scientific Revolution, as will developments in cartography, navigation, the art of war, medicine, and print culture. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 447 Reformation and Counter-reformation Europe

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    The course assesses the scope and impact of the sixteenth-century Reformations, both Protestant and Catholic, from the roots of reform in the late medieval era through the seventeenth century. Theologies and church structures emerging in this period will be examined, as will their cumulative impact on the individual household, community, and state. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 449 Ottoman History, 1281-1923

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course examines the history and culture of the Ottoman Empire. It will explore the origins and expansion of the Turkic warrior dynasty, the establishment and structure of the imperial Islamic state system, the contours of Ottoman society, economic decline, and disintegration of the Empire. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS391.
  
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    HST 450 History of the Balkans I: 1453-1804

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course examines the history of Southeastern Europe from the fall of the Byzantine Empire to the Balkan national movements in the early nineteenth century. Albeit one emphasizing culture and society, this course will also address the major political and diplomatic developments affecting the region. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS392.
  
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    HST 451 History of the Balkans II: 1804-1923

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Emphasizing the consequences of nationalism, as well as regional and Great Power politics, this course will examine the revolutionary movements, state formation, and nation-building processes that marked the emergence of the modern Balkan states. Diplomacy and conflict will also be explored. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS393.
  
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    HST 452 Byzantine History and Civilization

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course examines the history and civilization of the Byzantine Empire. It will trace the origins, ideology, life, and culture of this influential and complex polity and society - one based on the continuity of Roman statehood and identity within the medieval Greek and Orthodox worlds. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS390.
  
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    HST 454 Tudor-Stuart England

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    The course surveys English history during the Tudor-Stuart era (1485-1714), focusing on the English Reformations, the English Revolutions, and the formation of the British Empire. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 455 The Media Revolution in Early Modern Europe

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    The course examines the printing ¿revolution¿ in early modern Europe and the impact of print on European thought, culture, and society from the Renaissance to the French Revolution. Select topics include the diffusion of Renaissance culture and scientific research, the pamphlet literature of the Reformation. English and Atlantic Revolutions, and the role of communication networks in the development of the early modern state. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 460 Barbarians in the Greek And Roman World

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course examines the history of interaction between the cultures of Greece and Rome and the many other civilizations they lived alongside, including the kingdoms of Egypt and Persia and the Celtic and Germanic tribes. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 461 Roman Law

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course examines the origins, structure, and social effects of the Roman legal system in the period of the late republic through the late empire. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 465 The Holocaust

    3 Credit(s) V
    This course examines the Holocaust in the context of modern European history.  It examines the roots of anti-Semitism in Europe, the racialism of Nazi ideology and the social, political, and cultural factors leading to the genocide of millions of Jews and other groups during the Third Reich and World War II.  The course explores the historical, human and ethical dimensions of this event and engages students on issues such as ethnic diversity and oppression in a specific historical context.  Three lecture hours per week
  
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    HST 498 Topics in Gender History

    3 Credit(s)
    This course offers an in-depth examination of issues of gender history.  The professor will determine the geographic content, time periods, and thematic fields of the course.  This course includes a research and writing component.  Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 499 Topics in European History

    3 Credit(s)
    An examination of specialized topics in European history. The emphasis will be on historiographical debates or issues within the topic area and will include advanced historical readings and research. May be repeated for credit, or may be taken by students who have credit for HIS416, with the permission of the Department Chairperson. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    HST 500 Directed Study in History

    3 Credit(s)
    An individualized program for History majors and minors. An in-depth study of an aspect of history which falls within the expertise of one or more members of the History Department. The form of the program is developed cooperatively between the student and a consenting faculty member. The student may earn up to 6 credit hours by enrolling for 2 semesters. Students from other academic departments may take the course with permission of the History Department Chairperson. Not open to students who have received 6 credits for HIS500. Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    HST 501 Internship

    3 Credit(s)
    A field experience conducted cooperatively by the Department and public/private institutions. While interning, students engage in professional activities relevant to their history studies. The experience provides training and knowledge leading to professional growth. Open to History majors and those minoring in history who have completed 12 History credit hours beyond the World Civilization core requirement. Potential interns need the permission of a qualified Department faculty supervisor and Department Chairperson. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS401.
  
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    HST 502 International Study - Travel Seminar

    3 Credit(s) WC
    A study/travel course that incorporates a 1-2 week on-site research trip to an international location appropriate to the topic of the course. Topic varies. May be repeated for credit with permission of Department Chairperson. Lab fee. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for HIS 403.
  
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    HST 505 Seminar: Research and Writing in History

    3 Credit(s) W
     The seminar will involve examination and analysis of professional materials in journals and books of primary and secondary sources that deal with the process of research and writing a formal history paper. Faculty and peer discussion will also consider analytical and methodological points. Required of all History majors. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credits for HIS405 or HIS405A. Prerequisites: W-I, W-I and HIS290, or   (W-II).
  
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    HST 600 Honors in History

    3 Credit(s)
    Designed as a one or two semester research program, up to 6 credit hours may be earned. The student is required to conduct research on an aspect of history which falls within the expertise of one or more members of the History Department. While expected to work with a minimum of direction, the student is required to meet with the research director on a regular basis. The specific nature of the research program is developed cooperatively between the student and the director. Not open to students who have received 6 credits for HIS600. Prerequisites: An overall average of 3.0; a 3.5 average in History, and permission of Department Chairperson.

Hospitality Management

  
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    HRI 200 Introduction to Hospitality Management

    3 Credit(s)
    This course offers a comprehensive overview of hospitality management and provides students with opportunities to explore various facets of the industry as a potential future profession. This course will serve as the foundation for advanced area-specific Hospitality Management courses, including Hotel Operations Management, Food and Beverage Management, Hospitality Accounting, Hospitality Marketing and Sales, and others. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: BUS 170 .
  
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    HRI 201 Hotel Operations Management

    3 Credit(s)
    The course requires students to compare room division management in large hotels with those in small hotels including reservations, front desk operations, accounting, housekeeping, and auxiliary with appropriate computer applications. The course focuses on management history, planning, organization, leadership and current and future management issues. Prerequisite: HRI 200 .
  
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    HRI 204 Food and Beverage Management

    3 Credit(s)
    Management of both commercial and institutional food service operations. The focus is on management by menu concept, site selection process, functional cycle of control (purchasing, receiving, storing, and issuing), production forecast and scheduling. Development of operational and financial food and beverage cost controls, including menu pricing, budgeting, and internal/external sales analyses, including computer applications. Prerequisite: HRI 200 .
  
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    HRI 350 Human Resources Management in the Hospitality Industry

    3 Credit(s)
    The course covers planning for management of personnel including recruitment, selection and evaluation of employees in the industry. Focus on key hospitality resource management issues of a general, technical and social nature including communication, motivation and leadership, job stress and safety, security, government regulations, and discrimination. Prerequisites: HRI 201 , HRI 204 .
  
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    HRI 352 Hospitality Law

    3 Credit(s)
    The focus is on tort and contract rights and liability in the industry. Other areas of the law that will be discussed will include employment law, forms of ownership and laws related to the operation of a business that is open to public accommodation. Prerequisite: BUS 252 .
  
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    HRI 450 Meetings, Conferences, and Conventions

    3 Credit(s)
    Strategic and logistical considerations in the managing, the planning, development, marketing and implementation of meetings, conferences and conventions. Included in the foregoing is the management of the facility, involvement of the meeting planner for the client and the negotiation of the contract for the use. Prerequisite:  HRI 200 .
  
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    HRI 475 Casino Operations and Management

    3 Credit(s)
    An examination of the unique operating conditions associated with casino management. The focus is on the history of gambling and on the environment, operations, regulation, accounting and the economics, moral and cultural issues of gaming. Prerequisites:  HRI 201 , HRI 204 .
  
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    HRI 500 Hospitality Internship

    3 Credit(s)
    An academic work program in the hospitality industry for on the job development. Supervision is provided by a qualified individual in the organization with frequent consultation with a faculty member. A written report is required of the student. An internship may be part-time or full-time but a minimum of nine hours per week for the entire semester is required. Prerequisites:  HRI 201  or HRI 204 , Juniors and Seniors only.

Interdisciplinary Studies

  
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    IDS 108 The First Year Seminar I

    1.5 Credit(s)
    A group of approximately fifteen first year students, a faculty member, and a junior or senior student mentor will explore ways in which students can make optimal use of their college experiences. Seminar participants will consider social, educational, and career options in an interdisciplinary framework within which each student’s educational goals can be formulated through a process of conscious, value-directed decision making. Assignments foster development of academic survival skills; group size and the mentoring process support individual student growth. One 75-minute meeting per week plus occasional field trips and large group meetings. Required of all undeclared freshmen. IDS108 and IDS 109  constitute a two-semester sequence, for 1.5 credits per semester.
  
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    IDS 109 The First Year Seminar II

    1.5 Credit(s)
    A group of approximately fifteen first year students, a faculty member, and a junior or senior student mentor will explore ways in which students can make optimal use of their college experiences. Seminar participants will consider social, educational, and career options in an interdisciplinary framework within which each student’s educational goals can be formulated through a process of conscious, value-directed decision making. Assignments foster development of academic survival skills; group size and the mentoring process support individual student growth. One 75-minute meeting per week plus occasional field trips and large group meetings. Required of all undeclared freshmen. IDS 108  and IDS109 constitute a two-semester sequence, for 1.5 credits per semester.
  
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    IDS 180 Computer Applications

    3 Credit(s)
    An overview of computer applications including the use of word processing, spreadsheet, data base, and internet technologies. Students will learn to operate and understand computer hardware, and develop materials for both academic and personal through software. The role of computers in society and related social issues will be discussed. Three lecture hours per week and laboratory work outside of class. This course satisfies the Computer Literacy core requirement.
  
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    IDS 181 Fluency in Information Technology

    3 Credit(s) DII
    This course develops information technology fluency through concepts, capabilities, and skills to enable students to continuously adapt to the rapid changes in information technology. Students will develop these capabilities through completion of a series of theoretical and applied projects that are incorporated into a student ePortfolio. Knowledge of basic computer skills and office applications is helpful. This course satisfies the Computer Literacy core requirement.
  
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    IDS 189 Freshman Seminar in Interdisciplinary Studies

    3 Credit(s) DI DIII
    Designed to introduce students to questions and scholarship of a specialized topic using an interdisciplinary approach. This course fosters critical skills that are foundational to a liberal arts education and assists students in developing their identity as college students. Required of all first year freshmen accepted as Undeclared or Bachelor of Liberal Studies majors. It is recommended that students who have completed   and   see the department chairperson before enrolling. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    IDS 199 Life Experience Portfolio

    1.0 Credit(s)
    Prior learning form life experiences such as community service, volunteer experiences, work experiences, non-college educational prograqms, and individual study may be used as a basis to petition a department for credit. The life learning experience must meet the expectations of a particular course listed in the catalog. Through this workshop, the student will be guided in the preparation of a portfolio involving self-assessment, and educational goal clarification, which will be presented for academic approval. This course may be taken only once for credit.
  
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    IDS 202 Introduction to Women’s & Gender Studies

    3 Credit(s) DI DIII V CS
    Women’s Studies and Gender Studies are complementary interdisciplinary fields whose research and scholarship examines women’s and men’s lives, conditions and contributions within historical, social, cultural, national and transnational contexts. Students will explore how gender is constructed and negotiated through the lens of families, communities, education, society, film and the media. Feminist and gender based theories and methodologies will enhance student awareness regarding the interlocking systems of inequity, inequality, oppression and privilege thereby addressing issues of power, resistance and social transformation. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    IDS 220 Water Resources Planning and Management

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course is a comprehensive introduction to the economics and ecology of water supply and water pollution control. Topics include watershed management, groundwater protection and wastewater treatment. The inherent difficulty in applying static laws and regulations to a dynamic natural resource such as water is a recurring theme in the course. Strongly recommended for students interested in environmental management. One three-hour lecture per week. Offered by the Marine Studies Consortium. Application to campus Representative of the Marine Studies Consortium must be made one semester prior to the experience. Additional tuition fee required by Marine Studies Consortium.
  
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    IDS 230 Introduction to Latin American and Latino Studies

    3 Credit(s) DI DIII V
    Interdisciplinary study of Latin American, Caribbean and Latino histories and cultures. Draws upon various humanities and social science disciplines, as well as interdisciplinary fields of area studies defined by geography (Latin America, Caribbean) and ethnic studies defined by history, culture and identity (Latino Studies). Explores the similarities and differences among the diverse societies of Latin America and the Caribbean and the peoples of Latin American and Caribbean origin in the United States.
  
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    IDS 232 American Identities

    3 Credit(s) DI DIII V HP
    This course explores many different ideas about and debates over the meaning of  “America” and “Americans” while introducing students to the methods and materials of American Studies. Using an interdisciplinary perspective, students will study how “American” cultural and national identities have developed over four centuries and the impact of this history on “American” experiences today. Of particular interest will be the ways in which American identity(ies) is tied to race gender ethnicity and class. Students will learn to interpret cultural products drawn from popular and fine arts, literature, music, and film as well as historical, sociological and geographic documents and other non-fiction writing. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    IDS 234 Techniques for Healthy and Safe Food Preparation

    1 Credit(s)
    Through laboratory experiences and discussion this course is designed to introduce students to the modern concepts of nutrition related to the principles of food selection, preparation and handling. Emphasis will be placed on healthy menu planning, food sanitation and addressing nutrition competencies contained in the Massachusetts Health Curriculum Frameworks. One three-hour laboratory session per week. Lab fee may be required. Course may be held at off campus location. Required for the Health and Consumer Science Concentration in the SMS major.
  
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    IDS 250 Humanities in Cultural Settings

    3 Credit(s) DI V
    This course is an interdisciplinary study of three global cultures, one being American. The course focuses on a significant place and time in each culture’s history. These cultures are examined through two sets of sources: literary works and a collection of academic writings, pictures, maps, and artifacts. The course pays special attention to how cultures support specific social hierarchies and moral systems. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    IDS 255 Comparative Religious Traditions

    3 Credit(s) DI DIII V PGR WC
    This course is an interdisciplinary study of six major world religions - Buddhism, Taoism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism and Christianity - considering such issues as their moral teachings and practices; historical development, cultural and geographical settings, dominant narratives, forms of worship,  prayer, and meditation; use of scripture, images of the divine, aesthetic endeavors, and institutional structures. This course devotes special attention to these religions’, and their cultures’, diverse and evolving moral practices, ethical teachings, and traditions of moral and spiritual development.  Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    IDS 260 Introduction to Legal Studies

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course will explore the complex relationship between law and society. Focusing on the reciprocal nature of the law and the societal context in which law develops, the course will examine how social, economic, cultural and political forces shape the law’s ability to make effective rules and to define common social values. The course serves as an introduction to America legal, political, and social actors and institutions. Using an interdisciplinary perspective, students will investigate questions relating to ideology, globalization, inequality, community, authority, legitimacy, and individualism. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    IDS 265 Peace and Peace Building

    3 Credit(s) CS
    This course examines the historical, sociological, philosophical and environmental antecedents to conflict at the local, national and international levels and through a process of research, discussion and evaluation develops possible options that could have been used in the peaceful resolution of conflicts. A main focus is on current major peace keeping and peace making efforts. The course also examines the role that organizations and individuals play, and what options there are for the future. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    IDS 271 Information Technology, Society and Culture

    3 Credit(s) DI DIII CS
    An introductory study of the diverse effects of the global Information Technology revolution. Includes an analysis of the social, political, cultural and economic impact of computers and Information Technology and an examination of the philosophical, ethical and psychological implications of these new technologies.
  
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    IDS 275 Love and Compassion Across the World Religions

    3 Credit(s) PGR WC
    This course explores how love and compassion transform the self, interpersonal relations, and social action. Students will integrate readings and discussions with personal reflections and experiences. Readings include scriptures and significant texts in Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, and Confucianism, which illuminate these religions as well as their cultural contexts. Students will be given the opportunity to practice and examine techniques developed by the world religions to nurture love and compassion. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    IDS 287 Perspectives on Evil and the Holocaust

    3 Credit(s) CS PGR
    Focusing on the Holocaust as a model of genocidal intent and a case study to help in understanding the psychology and philosophy of evil, the course will explore the mentality of those who designed and carried out the “final solution” as well as those complicit with them. The ease and efficiency with which the genocide of over six million Jews and other Holocaust victims was accomplished raises profound questions about the human capacity for evil, the causes and means of dehumanization, the limits of obedience to authority and the potential of universal human right legislation. Using the perspectives of psychology, criminal justice, epistemology and post-modern ethics, the course discusses what the Holocaust can teach us about: 1) the psychological factors motivating and facilitating dehumanization and genocide; 2) the means of deterring and sanctioning those who commit racial motivated criminal acts; 3) ways to promote objective truth in historical research about the Holocaust, in light of the “revisionist” historiography of Holocaust deniers; and 4) the role of ethics in defining our interpersonal obligations and humanizing our relationships with others. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    IDS 289 Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course offers students the opportunity to explore a specialized topic using the methods and materials of more than one field of study. Depending on the topic, the course might include civic engagement or service-learning activities. Repeatable for credit.
  
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    IDS 290 Introduction to Medical Humanities

    3 Credit(s) DI DIII V WC
    This course will investigate important questions about health and health care through an interdisciplinary perspective.  Special emphasis will be placed on how cultural differences and structural inequalities (such as gender, race, ethnicity, socio-economic status, and geographic location) can affect the quality and accessibility of health care.  Students will examine a variety of sources related in the experience and treatment of disease that may range from works of art and literature to documentary film to reading in cross-cultural psychology and medial anthropology.  They will reflect on some of the ethical issues raised by forms of health-care delivery, medical research, and end-of-life decision making, and develop some of the skills ( observation, analysis, empathy, self-reflection) essential for humane medical care.
  
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    IDS 299 Topics in Student Affairs

    1 Credit(s)
    This course features intensive training in, and reflection on, specialized topics in student affairs. The emphasis is on education and training for practical application on campus and beyond. May be repeated with permission of the Department Chairperson for a maximum of three credits. Three lecture hours per week over a five-week period.
  
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    IDS 320 Human Sexuality I

    3 Credit(s) DIII PGR
    This course will provide an interdisciplinary approach to the study of human sexuality including a scientific understanding of the historical, biological, psychological and social/cultural influences on human sexuality and its expression. Information about human sexuality across the lifespan will be included. This course provides information about sexual identity, orientation, and how changing sexual attitudes are influencing the culture. The media’s impact on sexuality will be covered. Information about the biological and psychological causes of sexual dysfunction and their treatments will also be covered. This course also provides information about the prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted infections. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    IDS 325 Coastal Zone Management

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course presents a survey of the coastal environment, its physical characteristics, natural systems, economic uses and development pressures. Lectures examine strategies formulated in the U.S. for land and water resource management in the coastal zone. The roles of federal, state and local government. Offered by the Marine Studies Consortium. Application to campus Representative of the Marine Studies Consortium must be made one semester prior to the experience. Additional tuition fee required by Marine Studies Consortium.
  
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    IDS 331 Mentoring and the Mentor Relationship

    3 Credit(s)
    Designed to evaluate various models of mentoring, this course will explore the history, philosophy, theory, and practice of mentoring in higher education as well as other institutions and organizations. Students will examine mentor roles through case studies and as found in the literature. Consideration will also be given to the role of leadership in underrepresented populations in society. Class participation will involve group process activities. Students will work towards defining their roles as mentor and developing competencies in preparation to become student mentors of Salem State College or in outside organizations. Three class hours per week.
  
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    IDS 333 Topics in American Studies

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is a close examination of a topic significant in the creation of American culture(s) and identity(ies). It is designed to deepen knowledge of a particular area of American Studies while strengthening general American Studies methodological skills. Students will examine primary and secondary sources from a range of disciplines and conduct interdisciplinary research. Potential topics may be (but are not limited to) immigration, popular culture, religion, globalization, community, or consumerism. Required of students in the American Studies Concentration. May be repeated once for an additional 3 credits with permission of the Department Chairperson. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    IDS 333A A Global “America”, “America” and “Americans” in and of the World

    3 Credit(s) WC
    This course uses an interdisciplinary American Studies approach to explore the complex ways in which “America” and “Americans” have been constructed and understood within the context of a long-standing and ongoing global and transnational exchange of ideas, peoples and goods. By focusing attention on a range of non-US cultures and tracing the connections between them and what is often considered “American” culture (in the areas of demographics human rights popular culture and food ways) the course highlights two main points: The ways in which “American” identities as well as cultural economic political, intellectual practices and products have been shaped by peoples and cultures around the world and how peoples and cultures around the world have understood appropriated been influenced by or responded to the presence of “American” people cultures and practices historically and today. Centrally, this course focuses on the fact that understanding non-US cultures is essential to understanding both “America” and “Americans”. Key course themes and concepts include globalization trans-nationalism and intercultural knowledge. Course materials and methods are drawn from a range of disciplines including literature visual culture sociology, history, political science, journalism and music. Students will collaborate with university students outside of the US and examine the global culture and history of Salem itself over the past 400 ears. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    IDS 357 New Technologies for Information Retrieval

    3 Credit(s)
    Surveys the range and depth of Internet resources for academic, personal, and professional purposes. Students will learn to analyze types and quality of sources for particular research problems in various subject areas; to develop appropriate search strategies; and to evaluate information retrieved. Three lecture hours plus laboratory work outside of class each week.
  
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    IDS 360 Gender, Identity and Nationalism

    3 Credit(s)
    This course explores ways in which gender identity is linked with national identity. This includes the role of women in nationalist liberation movements; the gendered roles embodied in communal identity and individual identity. Through theory, film, and literature, students will explore cultural identity in non-Western contexts. Three class hours per week.
 

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