Oct 19, 2021  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

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Interdisciplinary Studies

  
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    IDS 366 Energy and the Environment

    3 Credit(s) DII
    This course focuses on understanding what energy is, how it is produced, and how it is utilized in modern society, drawing on concepts from physics, chemistry, geography and geology to understand energy production and conservation. The advantages and disadvantages of renewable and non-renewable energy sources will be analyzed, including issues of efficiency, availability, cost, pollution, and environmental impact. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Completion of a laboratory science sequence, or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    IDS 375 Research Practicum

    1-6 Credit(s)
    Students will work on a one-to-one basis with a member of the faculty engaged in a particular research project. Although the work involved will depend on the nature of the research, emphasis will be on providing the student with intensive, hands on experience with all phases of the process of conducting research. Credit load to be determined on a 3 hours/week per semester = 1 credit basis. Repeatable for up to 6 credits. Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor and Chairperson of Interdisciplinary Studies Department.
  
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    IDS 385 Community Organizing I

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course provides an introduction to the principles and theoretical structures of why and how to organize for participatory democracy at a grassroots level. As such this course aims to come to an understanding of how power is used to provide, as well as deny, access to goods, services, and basic human rights. This course covers actions from local, regional, national and international levels. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    IDS 389 Research Methods in Interdisciplinary Studies

    3 Credit(s) W-II


    Interdisciplinary research is a rewarding but challenging mode of inquiry, one that requires the practitioners to integrate research techniques, methodological approaches and literatures from a variety of disciplines. This course provides students with a structured learning environment to enable them to become grounded in the major research methodologies of interdisciplinary scholarship. Students will critique, evaluate, and interpret published research, develop a research proposal, and complete a literature review. Students will also consider how interdisciplinary thinking is relevant to their personal and professional goals. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: Successful WI course completion, Junior standing, or approval by Department Chairperson.

     

  
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    IDS 400 Directed Study

    3-6 Credit(s)
    An individualized program providing study in depth in an area to be approved by the Interdisciplinary Studies Department Chairperson.
  
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    IDS 401 Internship in Interdisciplinary Studies

    3-6 Credit(s)
    This course will provide students with professional experience and training in a public or private organization directly related to each student’s academic interest in Interdisciplinary Studies. The number of credit hours will vary with commitment. Potential interns need permission of a qualified IDS-affiliated faculty supervisor, Departmental Chairperson, or BLS Concentration Coordinator. This course is open only to BLS majors or IDS minors.
  
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    IDS 461 Seminar in American Studies

    3 Credit(s) W W-III
    This capstone course engages students in an exploration of American Studies scholarship and supports them as they conduct original research. Students will read classic and recent works in American Studies and investigate the topical, theoretical and methodological developments of the field. Each student will develop and complete a substantive research paper related to a current area of inquiry in the discipline. Required of all students in the American Studies Concentration. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: W-II course (pre- or co-req), IDS 232  and IDS 333  or permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    IDS 465 Seminar in Women’s Studies

    3 Credit(s) W
    The culminating seminar in the Women’s Studies Minor. The focus is on developing theoretical approaches to the study of those groups defined as minority, e.g. women and Third World people. Students will be encouraged to develop areas of inquiry and then to explain them and present their analysis in a variety of modes such as oral, written, film or videotape. Required of all Women’s Studies Minors.
  
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    IDS 470 Seminar in Comparative Religion

    3 Credit(s)
    A broad but integrated consideration of selected topics in comparative religion, intended as the culmination of the Religious Studies Minor. Three lecture hours per week. Required of Religious Studies Minors; open to other students with the permission of the Interdisciplinary Studies Department Chairperson.
  
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    IDS 485 Community Organizing II

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course builds on the material covered in IDS 385  Community Organizing I, building on that knowledge and applying it to specific Community/Grassroots organization. Students are required to do field work in an organization involved in community/grassroots work. Students learn and practice community organizing, and program development skills appropriate for community and legislative audiences supervised by college faculty and organization/agency staff. One and one-half lecture hours each week and a total of seventy-two hours of field work. Prerequisite: IDS 385  or permission of department chairperson.
  
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    IDS 489 Senior Capstone in Interdisciplinary Studies

    3 Credit(s) W
    This course will assist you in understanding the research and writing process developed in your IDS 389 proposal.  Working with peer groups and one-on-one with faculty research mentors, you will implement and write up a significant research project that you will present to faculty, peers, and members of the Salem State University community.  Final projects will be bound and housed in the Interdisciplinary Studies office.  Prerequisites: Senior status and   or permission of the chairperson.
  
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    IDS 500 Special Problems in Interdisciplinary Studies

    3 Credit(s)
    Open to students who wish to pursue topics that are of an advanced interdisciplinary nature. May be taken on a semester or quarterly basis. Permission of Instructor and Interdisciplinary Studies Department Chairperson required.
  
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    IDS 600H Honors Seminar I

    1.5 Credit(s)
    This two semester sequence is intended to prepare students in the Honors Program for their independent research project or creative production required during the Program’s senior year. Principally the seminar will involve presentations of faculty and guest speaker research projects. Presentations about the College’s computer facilities, Library resources, and Career Planning and Placement Center, the Graduate Record Examination, etc. may also be included. Prerequisite: Open only to Juniors and Seniors in the Honors Program.
  
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    IDS 601H Honors Seminar II

    1.5 Credit(s) W


    This two semester sequence is intended to prepare students in the Honors Program for their independent research project or creative production required during the Program’s senior year. Principally the seminar will involve presentations of faculty and guest speaker research projects. Presentations about the College’s computer facilities, Library resources, and Career Planning and Placement Center, the Graduate Record Examination, etc. may also be included. This course supports the writing of the final senior project/thesis through instruction in writing and peer-editing. Open only to Juniors and Seniors in the Honors Program. Prerequisite: IDS 600H .


     

  
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    IDS 603H Honors Independent Study

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed as a one or two semester research program (3 credits per semester). It provides Commonwealth Honors Program seniors an opportunity to integrate their undergraduate experiences while preparing for their intended career paths. Working independently students conduct in-depth research within their own major discipline or across disciplines, undertake creative or community-action projects, or work intensively on other scholarly endeavors, all under the guidance of an experienced faculty mentor. Course is limited to Honors Program students. This course may be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: IDS 600H .

Information Technology

  
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    ITC 100 Computers and Their Uses

    3 Credit(s) DII
    This course provides an overview of the capabilities, uses and limitations of computers. The major types of software packages are discussed: operating systems, word processors, database systems, spreadsheets and communication packages. Applications of computers in areas such as business, education, graphic arts, medicine and engineering are surveyed. The major focus of the course is to present topics in the context of the impact of computers on functions such as decision-making, information storage, research and personal productivity. The general discussion is reinforced by skills-oriented lecture/demonstrations and assignments using specific software packages. Three lecture hours per week plus laboratory work outside of class. This course satisfies the Computer Literacy core requirement. Not open to students who have received credit for CSC100. Prerequisites: High school Algebra I & II.
  
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    ITC 117 Computing in the Professions

    3 Credit(s)
    An examination of the problem solving process for individuals in an organizational setting using the latest application software. Emphasis will be placed on the use of spreadsheet and database software for problem solving, and their integration with other software tools, including text processing and presentation graphics. Planning, data collection, methodology, analysis of results and implementation will be included  Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    ITC 121 Web Graphics

    3 Credit(s)
    An introduction to Computer Graphics, the course is designed to introduce non Computer Science majors to topics related to the application of graphics in today’s world. The class will review graphic file types and related application issues in a computer environment. Students will concentrate on the computer manipulation of graphics related to web, digital photography and related processes. The course will survey and use a variety of graphics packages, including Photoshop, Ilustrator and available open source software. Special attention will be paid to animation using Flash and CSS based models. Although not intended for those with a programming background, an introduction to graphics programming using Action Script and PHP will be included. Material in the class will be suitable to students using a variety of platforms, including Windows, Mac OS X and Linux. Not open to students who have received credit for CSC220 or CSC121. Three lecture hours per week with laboratory work outside of class. Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the Computer Literacy Competency Requirement as verified by Department Chairperson.
  
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    ITC 131 Input Technologies for Text Processing

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is an introduction to incorporating the latest technologies for computer input, such as speech recognition and tablet handwriting recognition for the production of documents. Topics include basic word processing functions including creation, revision, editing, formatting, and proofreading. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: Completion of the College’s Computer Literacy core requirement.
  
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    ITC 132 Computer-based Statistics

    3 Credit(s)
    This course deals with the computer implementation of common statistical procedures through software packages such as SPSS, BMDP or SAS. The use of basic descriptive statistics, frequency and contingency tables, correlation, regression, analysis of variance, and other procedures is illustrated through case studies and laboratory assignments. Attention is paid to design of experiments, selection and appropriate statistical procedures, and interpretation of results. No previous computer experience required. Three lecture hours per week. Credit for this course may not be applied to the major or minor in Computer Studies. Not open to student who have received credit for CSC132. Prerequisite: One course in applied statistics.
  
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    ITC 135 Computers and Planning

    3 Credit(s)
    This course presents a basic understanding of the use of computer application packages in planning. The course is intended for all students who want to get an idea of the help that computers can give in planning for many different disciplines. Examples will be used that will be of interest to Business, Education, Criminal Justice, Nursing, Computer Science and many other majors. Credit for this course may not be applied to the major or minor in Computer and Information Studies. Three lecture hours per week plus laboratory work outside of class. Not open to students who have received credit for CSC135. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the Computer Literacy competency-based skills requirement.
  
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    ITC 146 Programming in Java with Internet Applications

    4 Credit(s)
    This course presents the principal features of the Java language, including the Java compiler, byte code, data types, standard control structures, classes, objects and methods. Abstraction mechanisms, threads, I/O streams, exception handling, and the use of run-time libraries are also covered. Effective program and output design are emphasized. Programming assignments include both stand-alone applications and the writing of applets designed for use within web pages. Credit for this course may not be applied to the major or minor in Computer and Information Studies. No more than one of the courses numbered ITC140 through 149 may be counted for degree credit. Not open to students who have received credit for CSC146, or CSC201 or CSC 110 . Prerequisites: High school Algebra I & II.
  
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    ITC 181 Fluency in Information Technology

    3 Credit(s) DII
    This course develops information technology fluency through concepts, capabilities, and skills to enable students to continuously adapt to the rapid changes in information technology. Students will develop these capabilities through completion of a series of theoretical and applied projects that are incorporated into a student ePortfolio. Knowledge of basic computer skills and office applications is helpful. This course satisfies the Computer Literacy core requirement.
  
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    ITC 184 Introduction to Computer Networks

    3 Credit(s)
    This course presents the principle features of computer networks, including hardware, software, troubleshooting, and maintenance. Effective problem-solving strategies and a methodical approach to network problems will be emphasized. Assignments will include both written work and the configuration of a simple network and the application of troubleshooting and maintenance procedures. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: Fulfillment of the competency-based skills computer literacy requirement.
  
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    ITC 190 Problem Solving in Virtual Worlds

    3 Credit(s) DII
    This course is an introduction to the skill of problem solving. Students will learn skills to define problems, gather information, and think creatively in order to develop alternative ways of solving a particular problem. Topics include problem-solving methods, software development strategies such as top-down and bottom-up design, step-wise refinement, testing and debugging, and how to read, modify and develop simple algorithms. Algorithms will be implemented using 3D animation and/or virtual reality tools, such as Alice, Greenfoot, and/or Karel the Robot. Three lecture hours per week, plus laboratory work outside of class. Not open to students who have received credit for CSC190 or CSC201. Credit for this course may not be applied to the Major or Minor in Computer Studies. Prerequisites: High school Algebra I and II.
  
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    ITC 201 Web Programming with PHP/MySQL

    3 Credit(s) DII
    This course is an introduction to the open-source PHP language, including a comprehensive review of basic syntax and applications, and to the MySQL database standard. Students will learn to code, execute, test and install PHP applications, apply advanced PHP techniques to web page design, and implement websites that create and access remote databases in a variety of client-style applications. Topics will include: variables, functions, loops, arrays, string handling, files, and basic server applications. MySQL, a related web database application, will be introduced. Students will learn how to create databases, update tables, and perform advanced web functions integrating PHP with forms, CSS and Javascript. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: ITC 181 .
  
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    ITC 241 Spreadsheet for the Professions

    3 Credit(s)
    An in-depth expansion of the spreadsheet topics introduced in ITC 117  will be presented. Using the latest spreadsheet software, students will study the commonly used spreadsheet functions such as financial analysis, data and look-up tables, templates, macros, pivot tables and complex problem solving. Techniques for designing, using and analyzing spreadsheets for practical problem solving in various professions will be emphasized. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: ITC 117  or Permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    ITC 325 Database Applications in the Professions

    3 Credit(s)
    An in-depth expansion of the database topics introduced in ITC117 will be presented. Using the latest PC-based spreadsheet software, students will study project planning and design concepts, tables and defining relationships, querying and structured query language, advanced form report building, pivot Tables, macros and administering a database. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for BTE325. Prerequisite: a passing grade on the College’s Computer Literacy Examination as verified by Department Chairperson or ITC 100  or ITC 117 .
  
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    ITC 500 Directed Study in information Technology

    3 Credit(s)
    Under the supervision of a faculty supervisor, the student will carry out a substantial project focusing on a relevant information technology topic or issue, or the development of a creative or innovative approach to using a technology tool or application that will further enhance or strengthen the student’s skill sets as an end-user in a global, technical world. A preliminary project proposal will be submitted to the faculty supervisor prior to registering for the course. Prerequisites: Prerequisites will vary with the project and are at the discretion of the faculty supervisor for the project.
  
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    ITE 310 Computer Networks

    4 Credit(s)
    This course begins with an introduction to computer networks, including hardware, software, troubleshooting, and maintenance.  IT professionals need to understand various components of the networking infrastructure of an organization as well as the various protocols and standards used to implement these infrastructures.  TCP/IP stack will be presented with discussion of OSI layered model and data/control flow through each layer using top-down or bottom-up approaches. Understanding of networking protocols, TCP/IP stack and troubleshooting, and maintenance of networks will be given through class lectures as well as labs.  Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week. Prerequisites: ITE 105 , ITE 201 .
  
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    ITE 315 Information Security

    4 Credit(s)
    The course covers a unified view of information security that examines the closely related areas of information security, software security, networks, web security and forensics using a common set of underlying security principles.  Students will get an understanding of how to model secure environments and how to implement these starting from standalone computers, operating systems and then going towards distributed networks and web.  Each of the security areas is examined in sufficient detail for students to understand the complexity of modern threats and the corresponding sophistication of the software and hardware that is designed to counter these threats.  Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week. Prerequisite: ITE 310 .
  
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    ITE 320 Information Management Systems

    4 Credit(s)
    It is the role of the IT professional to develop, deploy, manage and integrate data and information systems to support the organization.  At a fundamental level, Information Management Systems address these issues by providing mechanisms of storing, searching, updating, and retrieving information.  Underlying all of these functionalities are the concepts of a file and file organization, upon which is built the concept of an information management system.  This course presents the fundamental concepts of data organization architectures, database management system models and query languages, principles of data modeling, and techniques for managing a database environment.  Contemporary distributed network-based data storage mechanisms are also discussed.  Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week. Prerequisites: ITE 105 , ITE 201 .
  
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    ITE 330 Web Systems

    4 Credit(s)
    This course provides an introduction to web systems and technologies, including an overview of architecture of a website, implementation, evaluation and testing of web-based applications and programming aspects of web development (web content development, markup languages coding, client-side and serve-side application development).  Topics include understanding of Web standards, description of basic components of a website, general principles of web interface design and development, use of databases, multimedia, and structure of the interface between a website and the Internet.  Social, ethical and legal issues of web usage (e-commerce, social networks, etc.) will also be discussed.  Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week. Prerequisites: ITE 105 , ITE 201 .
  
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    ITE 340 Human Computer Interaction

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of Human Computer Interaction (HCI), a discipline that focuses on designing highly usable software systems. The study of human-computer interaction enables system architects to design useful, efficient, and enjoyable computer interfaces. This course teaches the theory of human psychology, principles of computer systems, user interface design procedure, and programming practices behind effective human interaction with computer. The course considers the interdisciplinary nature of HCI and introduces various issues involved in using technologies for different purposes in the organizational and social contexts. The course will thus provide a background for students to practice system design, selection, evaluation, and use the knowledge of human characteristics, interactions styles, user and task analysis, and design and evaluation procedures. Three lecture hours per week.
    Prerequisites: ITE105 , ITE201 .
  
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    ITE 350 IT System Integration, Administration, and Management

    4 Credit(s)
    Virtually all organizations have IT needs. It is the role of the IT professional to design, select, apply, deploy and manage computing systems to support the organization. This course presents methods, tools, and techniques used to design, build, and administer a viable IT environment. It assumes prior knowledge of computer architecture, IT fundamentals, networking, programming, and information management. Topics to be presented include installing and configuring operating systems and applications, IT administrative activities, administrative domains, software requirements and testing, software acquisition and sourcing, integration and deployment, project management, testing and quality assurance, and system architecture. Three lecture hours per week and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week.
    Prerequisites: ITE315 , ITE320 , ITE330 .
  
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    ITE 410 Advanced Computer Networks

    4 Credit(s)
    This course offers an in-depth look at the top-down approach to networks, taking into consideration the requirements and goals, and understanding the methodologies and techniques involved in a complex network infrastructure. Topics include: identifying the needs and goals for building networks, logical and physical network design, addressing and numbering, switching and routing protocols, developing network security strategies, and selecting technologies and devices for campus and enterprise networks. Four lecture hours per week.
    Prerequisite: ITE315  
  
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    ITE 420 Database Administration

    4 Credit(s)
    A database administrator (DBA) directs or performs all activities related to maintaining a successful database environment. This course demonstrates the fundamental tasks and functions required of a DBA. The topics of this course include understanding the role of DBA, creating the database environment, application design, database change management, data availability, data integrity, database security, database management system utilized, the concepts and procedures presented in this course are typical for any database management system server. Four lecture hours per week.
    Prerequisite: ITE320  or by permission of the Department Chair person.
  
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    ITE 501 Information Technology Capstone Project Specification

    1 Credit(s)
    This course sets up a typical environment for the development of a detailed proposal for a software- or hardware- Information Technology based project. The instructor will assist each student in choosing an appropriate project topic and in refining the project proposal through all stages from initial outline to final formal specification and presentation. The completed proposal will serve as the contract for the ITE505  Information Technology Capstone Project. The course involves periodic meetings, group discussions (if appropriate), and individual conferences. A presentation of the completed proposal will be made to the department faculty and students. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis and is taught on a Directed Study basis. Open only to Information Technology majors.
    Prerequisite: ITE350  and permission of the program coordinator/department chairperson (as appropriate). Additional prerequisites, which vary with the project.
  
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    ITE 505 Information Technology Capstone Project

    3 Credit(s)
    A substantial project involving system design and implementation is carried out on an individual basis under the supervision of a faculty member. The specification for the capstone must have been completed in the prerequisite course ITE501 . A presentation of the completed project will be made to the department faculty and students; writing experiences will be used to develop skills in analysis and rhetoric. The course involves periodic meetings, group discussions (if appropriate), and individual conferences. Open only to Information Technology majors.
    Prerequisites: ITE501  and permission of the department chairperson.

Italian

  
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    ITL 101 Elementary Italian I

    3 Credit(s)
    An introductory course in Italian. Beginning skills are developed in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, writing and culture. Three hours of class work per week, supplemented by one hour of assigned work in the Language Resource Center.
  
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    ITL 102 Elementary Italian II

    3 Credit(s)
    Continuation of ITL 101 . An introductory course in Italian. Beginning skills are developed in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, writing and culture. Three hours of class work per week, supplemented by one hour of assigned work in the Language Resource Center. Prerequisite: ITL 101  or equivalent.
  
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    ITL 201 Intermediate Italian I

    3 Credit(s) WC
    The principal aim of this course and its continuation is to solidify and expand upon the skills acquired in ITL 101 -ITL 102 . Basic grammar is reviewed while new grammatical material is introduced. Students will explore various aspects of Italian culture.  In addition, some literary texts are used. Three hours of class work per week, supplemented by one hour of assigned work in the Language Resource Center. Prerequisite: ITL 102  or equivalent.
  
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    ITL 202 Intermediate Italian II

    3 Credit(s) WC
    Continuation of ITL 201 . The principal aim of this course and its continuation is to solidify and expand upon the skills acquired in ITL 101 -ITL 102 . Basic grammar is reviewed while new grammatical material is introduced.  Students will explore various aspects of Italian culture.  In addition, some literary texts are studied. Three hours of class work per week, supplemented by one hour of assigned work in the Language Resource Center. Prerequisite: ITL 201  or equivalent.
  
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    ITL 303 Italian Conversation

    3 Credit(s)
    In this course, students will develop spoken proficiency in Italian. Students will practice listening skills with films, documentaries, songs, radio, television programs or other audiovisual materials. These materials will also generate discussion topics for class and help students to expand their vocabulary. Through dialogs and role-playing, students will practice speaking in a variety of situations encountered in day-to-day living. Three lecture hours per week, supplemented by listening activities in the Language Resource Center. Conducted entirely in Italian. Prerequisite: ITL 202  or equivalent.
  
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    ITL 350 Advanced italian Grammar

    3 Credit(s)


    In this course, students will study the finer points of Italian grammar. This course is for students who already have a good foundation in Italian (through a communicative or contextual approach), but who need a thorough review of grammar as they move to the next level of proficiency.  Particular attention will be paid to differences between Italian and English grammatical structures, and students will work on translation, writing and dictation.

    Prerequisite:ITL 202  or higher or equivalent proficiency in Italian as determined by the chair of the World Languages and Cultures department.

  
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    ITL 353 Readings in Italian

    3 Credit(s)
    This course explores the techniques of critical reading and develops reading proficiency in Italian while furthering understanding of Italian literature and culture. Essays and literary selections introduce students to the principles of textual analysis and serve as topics for class discussion, while providing insight into the Italian experience. Three hours of class work per week. Conducted entirely in Italian. Prerequisite: ITL 202  or equivalent.
  
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    ITL 354 Italian Composition Through Film

    3 Credit(s) DI W-II
    In this course, students will further develop proficiency in writing Italian. Selected Italian language films and literary excerpts will generate topics for composition in Italian, as well as broadening students’ understanding of Italian culture, geography, and history. Focus will be on developing writing skills acquired at the intermediate level appropriate for tasks such as: describing, narrating, summarizing, or expressing an opinion. Three lecture hours per week, plus required viewing of films outside of class. Conducted entirely in Italian. Prerequisite: ITL 202  or equivalent and WI course.
  
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    ITL 380 Topics in Italian Literature

    3 Credit(s)
    This course features in-depth study of a particular cultural topic in Italian, which may include the study of a particular genre, theme or literary period. The course topic, selected by the professor, will emphasize the analysis of literary texts, and may include a focus on stylistic, cultural themes and/or historical context. Conducted in Italian. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: I  or equivalent.
  
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    ITL 381 Topics in Italian Culture

    3 Credit(s)
    This course features in-depth study of a particular cultural topic in Italian, which may include the study of a particular region of Italy or a topic that crosses regional borders. The course topic, selected by the professor, will emphasize the analysis of authentic cultural texts, such as film, music, art, news or magazine articles, Web sites, literature, or historical documents. Conducted in Italian. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite:   or equivalent.
  
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    ITL 400 Italian Translation Practicum

    3 Credit(s)
    In this course, students will learn strategies for effective translation (English/Italian, Italian/English) and practice these skills using a variety of source materials. Emphasis will be placed on developing proficiency in the craft of translation and on awareness of the relationship between language and culture. Prerequisite: ITL 202  or higher or equivalent proficiency in Italian as determined by the chairperson of the World Languages and Cultures department.
  
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    ITL 401 Introduction to Italian Literature I

    3 Credit(s) DI
    This is an advanced course in Italian designed to introduce students to major authors and trends in Italian literature from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment.  Conducted in Italian.  Three lecture hours per week.  Prerequisite: ITL 202  or equivalent.
  
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    ITL 402 Introduction to Italian Literature II

    3 Credit(s) DI
    This is an advanced course in Italian designed to introduce students to major authors and trends in Italian literature of the 19th century through the present.  Conducted in Italian.  Three lecture hours per week.  Prerequisite: ITL 202  or equivalent.
  
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    ITL 450 Italian Experience

    3 Credit(s)
    This is an experiential learning course in Italian.  The student will use intermediate-level or advanced Italian language skill to actively participate in an internship, a service-learning project, a travel-study research project or other experiential learning project.  A minimum of fifteen hours of field experience per credit is required.  Readings related to the experience, weekly journal submissions and a final paper or portfolio will chronicle and analyze the internship experience.  Three to six credit hours.  Prerequisites:  Any two courses at the 300-level or higher in Italian.
  
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    ITL 500 Directed Study in Italian

    3 Credit(s)
    This is an individualized, in-depth course for Italian minors, taking into account the needs and interests of the student, as well as the expertise of the faculty member supervising the directed study. Conducted in Italian. Prerequisites:   and permission of the Department Chairperson.

Latin

  
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    LAT 101 Elementary Latin I

    3 Credit(s)
    In this introductory course in Latin, beginning skills are developed in the areas of speaking, reading, and writing Latin. Students are also introduced to the culture of Ancient Rome. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    LAT 102 Elementary Latin II

    3 Credit(s)
    A continuation of Elementary Latin I (LAT101), this course further builds skills in the areas of speaking, reading, and writing Latin. Students continue to explore various aspects of the culture of Ancient Rome. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: LAT101  or equivalent.
  
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    LAT 201 Intermediate Latin I

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is a continuation of Elementary Latin II.  Students will continue to develop proficiency in Latin etymology, grammar, reading, translation, and writing.  In this course, students will translate authentic Latin texts and there will be a systematic review of Latin grammar any syntax.  Prerequisite:   or equivalent.
  
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    LAT 202 Intermediate Latin II

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is a continuation of Intermediate Latin I.  Students will continue to develop proficiency in Latin etymology, grammar, reading, translation, and writing.  In this course, students will translate authentic Latin texts and there will be a systematic review of Latin grammar any syntax.  Prerequisite:   or equivalent.

Mathematics

  
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    FYMA 100 First Year Seminar (Mathematics)

    3 Credit(s) FYS
    This course will introduce student to the experience of academic exploration that is at the heart of a liberal arts education. Through study of one or more compelling questions or topics in a small seminar setting, students will practice creative and critical thinking and will learn to express themselves effectively and appropriately in a college setting. They will develop relationships and practices that allow them to effectively utilize college resources and become members of a community of learners. The specific topic of the seminar will be developed by individual faculty and will be announced in advance. First year seminars are required for first-year students and transfer students with fewer than 15 credits. Not open to students who have received credit for IDS 189  or another first year seminar course.
  
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    MAT 090 Basic Algebra

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is intended to develop those ideas, computational techniques, and methods of reasoning used in college mathematics, with an emphasis on algebra needed to formulate and solve first and second degree equations, constructing models using linear and quadratic functions, and concepts of coordinate geometry. Only for students entering Fall 1999 or later who have not passed either the Accuplacer Elementary Algebra Test or the College Level Math Test or for those students who entered before Fall 1999 who have not satisfied the Basic Mathematics Competency Requirement. Does not give degree credit. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    MAT 108 Finite Mathematics

    3 Credit(s) DII
    This course will include sets, real numbers, inequalities, the straight line, functions, operations on matrices, systems of equations, inverse of a matrix, linear programming, the Simplex method, counting, permutations and combinations, sample spaces, and probability. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: Completion of the Basic College Mathematics Competency Requirement.
  
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    MAT 110 Precalculus

    3 Credit(s) DII QR
    This course is intended to prepare the student for the study of Calculus. Topics include: properties of the real number systems; absolute values, inequalities; detailed study of linear and quadratic equations; polynomial and rational functions and their graphs; exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to those students who received credit for MAT202N. Prerequisite: Completion of the Basic College Mathematics Competency Requirement.
  
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    MAT 120 Mathematics for the Liberal Arts

    3 Credit(s) DII QR
    This course is designed to give the liberal arts student, as well as other interested students, an introduction to some mathematical topics which broadly reflect the nature of the discipline. Topics are selected to highlight mathematical problem solving, the use of mathematical models and/or analysis of quantitative data. Topics may include probability and descriptive statistics, voting theory, graph theory, cryptography, game theory, chaos, and problems relating to the environment.  Classroom lectures and discussions cover the basic theories. These are followed by writing assignments which form an essential component of the course. Not open to math majors without the permission of the Department Chairperson.  Three lecture hours per week.  This course satisfies the Quantitative Reasoning category.
    Prerequisite: Completion of the Basic College Mathematics Competency Requirement.
  
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    MAT 123 Mathematics for the Elementary Teacher I

    3 Credit(s) DII
    This course is the first in a sequence designed for prospective elementary teachers. Topics include numeration systems, algorithms and estimation for the arithmetic operations, number theory, patterns, and properties of basic functions. Use of manipulatives and relevant technology may be integrated into the course. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for MAT123A.
    Prerequisite: Satisfation of the Basic Mathematics Competency Requirement.
  
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    MAT 124 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II

    3 Credit(s) DII Q QR
     This course is a continuation of Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I.  Topics will include geometric figures and solids, congruence, similarity, constructions, measurement including perimeter, area, surface area and volume, geometric transformations, descriptive statistics and basic probability theory. Use of manipulatives and relevant technology may be integrated into the course. Not open to students who have received credit for MAT223A. Three lecture hours per week. 
    Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the Basic Mathematics Competency Requirement.
  
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    MAT 128 Quantitative Methods for Business and Finance

    3 Credit(s) QR
    This course is an introduction to the mathematics used in business. Topics may include graphing linear equations and inequalities, solving systems of linear equations and inequalities, linear programming, simple and compound interest, annuities, descriptive statistics, and rates of change. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to student who have received credit for MAT 108.
    Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the Basic Mathematics Competency Requirement.
  
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    MAT 147 Statistics

    3 Credit(s) DII Q QR
    This course is an introduction to elementary data analysis. Topics will include descriptive statistics. Normal distributions, sampling, interval estimation, testing of hypotheses, and linear regression. The emphasis is on practical and usable results, rather than on mathematical derivations. This course is intended to prepare students to use statistics in business, nursing, the social sciences, or education. Offered each semester. Three lecture hours per week.
    Prerequisite: Completion of the Basic College Mathematics Competency Requirement.
  
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    MAT 208 Business Calculus

    3 Credit(s) DII Q
    Introduction to calculus as applied to business. Differentiation, integration, and their applications are considered in conjunction with polynomial, algebraic, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: Completion of the Basic College Mathematics Competency Requirement.
  
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    MAT 214A Discrete Structures

    4 Credit(s) DII
    A study of discrete mathematical structures of interest in computer science and other applied fields. Topics will be chosen from logic, proof techniques, sets, boolean algebra, functions, relations, basics of counting, recursion, graphs, trees, and discrete probability. Four lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for either MAT214 or MAT 314 .
  
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    MAT 218 Introduction to Mathematical Computing

    1 Credit(s)
    An introduction to a computer algebra system. Topics include the application of a computer algebra system to plotting functions, solving equations, simplifying expressions, and the creation of clear and attractive mathematical reports. One lecture hour per week. Prerequisite: MAT 220 .
  
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    MAT 220 Calculus I

    4 Credit(s) DII Q QR
    An introduction to the differential calculus of real-valued functions of one real variable. Topics include limits and derivatives and their applications in a context that includes polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Offered each semester. Four lecture hours per week. Required of all Mathematics majors. Prerequisites: Completion of the Basic College Mathematics Competency Requirement and either MAT 110  or a thorough knowledge of trigonometric and logarithmic functions.
  
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    MAT 221 Calculus II

    4 Credit(s) DII
    An introduction to the integral calculus of real-valued functions of one real variable. Topics include infinite sequences and series of real numbers and integrals and their applications in a context that includes polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Offered each semester. Four lecture hours per week. Required of all mathematics majors. Prerequisite: MAT 220 .
  
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    MAT 234 Introduction to Mathematical Proof

    3 Credit(s) W W-II
    This course is an introduction to mathematical proof and the fundamental notions of higher mathematics. Topics include the basics of propositional logic, set theory, number theory, mathematical induction, functions, equivalence relations, and cardinality with an emphasis on writing proofs. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: MAT 220  and a W-I course.
  
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    MAT 303A Abstract Algebra I

    3 Credit(s) DII
     

    This course is a proof-oriented introduction to groups.  Topics will include examples and elementary properties of groups, subgroups, cyclic groups, symmetry groups, group isomorphisms and homomorphisms, normal subgroups and quotient groups, and direct products of groups.  Three lecture hours per week.  Required of all mathematics majors.  Not open to students who have received credit for MAT303.

    Prerequisites: MAT 234 

  
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    MAT 304A Linear Algebra I

    3 Credit(s) DII
    This course is an introduction to vector spaces and linear transformations primarily in Euclidean spaces.  Topics include the algebra of matrices, linear independence, determinants, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors. Three lecture hours per week.  Required of all mathematics majors. Prerequisite:MAT 220 .
  
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    MAT 306 Theory of Numbers

    3 Credit(s)


    This course is a study of the arithmetic properties of numbers. Topics will included divisibility, prime numbers, congruences, Diophantine equations, number-theoretic functions, primitive roots and indices, and quadratic residues. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: MAT 303A .

     



     

  
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    MAT 308 Linear Programming

    3 Credit(s) DII


     This course is a study of linear optimization with application to business and the sciences. Topics may include linear equations and inequalities, convex regions, the simplex algorithm, duality and minimax theorems, matrix games, transportation and assignment problems. Experience is provided in the computer solution of linear programming problems. Three lecture hours per week.
    Prerequisite: MAT210 or MAT 220 .


     

  
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    MAT 314 Discrete Mathematics

    3 Credit(s)
     

    This course is a further study of discrete mathematical structures.  Topics may include finite-state machines, feedback, partially ordered sets, lattices, recursion and iteration, with applications to logic, circuit design, and computer systems. Three lecture hours per week.
    Prerequisite: MAT 234 

  
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    MAT 316 Combinatorial Mathematics

    3 Credit(s)


     This course is a survey of combinatorial methods.  Topics may include graphs, trees, networks, permutations and combinations, partitions, and enumeration theory. Three lecture hours per week.

    Prerequisite:  MAT 234  .

  
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    MAT 320 Calculus III

    4 Credit(s)
    An introduction to two and three dimensional analytic geometry and an extension of the ideas of calculus to both real-valued functions of several variables and vector-valued functions. Topics include polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, vectors in two and three dimensions, limits, derivatives and integrals of functions of several variables and vector-valued functions. Offered each fall. Four lecture hours per week. Required of all mathematics majors. Prerequisite: MAT 221 .
  
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    MAT 323 Numerical Analysis

    3 Credit(s)
    A study of numerical methods. Topics include root finding for nonlinear equations, polynomial interpolation, series methods, numerical integration, finite differences, and solutions of linear systems. Efficiency, accuracy and round off and truncation errors are considered. Computer implementation of selected methods is included. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: MAT 221 .
  
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    MAT 403 Abstract Algebra II

    3 Credit(s)
    Topics include normal subgroups, ideals, morphisms of groups and rings, fields and field extensions with examples and applications. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for MAT404. Prerequisite: MAT 303A .
  
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    MAT 406 Modern Geometry

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is a study of topics in advanced geometry from three perspectives: synthetic, analytic, and transformational.  Topics include advanced results in Euclidean geometry, axiomatic development of Euclidean and non-Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries, the use of coordinates, transformations, and symmetries.  Writing, primarily in the form of mathematical proof, is an essential component of the course.  Three lecture hours per week. Required of all Mathematics majors with a Secondary Education minor.  Not open to students who have received credit for MAT405.
    Prerequisite:  MAT 234  and MAT 304A 
  
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    MAT 407 Probability and Mathematical Statistics I

    3 Credit(s)


    This course is an introduction to probability models and random variables. Topics may include simple counting methods, expectation, variance, moment and moment generating functions, the binomial, Poisson, exponential, and Normal distributions. Three lecture hours per week. Required of all Mathematics majors with a Secondary Education minor.
    Prerequisite: MAT 221 

     


     

  
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    MAT 409 Complex Variables

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is a study of functions of a complex variable. Topics may include Cauchy-Riemann equations, Cauchy’s integral theorem and formula, the calculus of residues, series expansions of analytic functions, singularities, and contour integration. Three lecture hours per week.
    PrerequisiteMAT 221  or MAT 234 .
  
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    MAT 410 History of Mathematics

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is a survey of the fundamental developments in mathematics from ancient to modern times, with special attention to the historical and logical bases of geometry, algebra, and analysis. Three lecture hours per week.|
    Prerequisite: MAT 221  .
  
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    MAT 411 Real Analysis

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is a rigorous study of the fundamental ideas of calculus.  Topics may include sequences, limits, continuity, derivatives, and integrals. Three lecture hours per week. Required of all mathematics majors.
    Prerequisite: MAT 221  or MAT 234 
  
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    MAT 412 Topology

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is a study of abstract mathematical spaces.  Topics may include topological spaces, metric spaces, connectedness, compactness, and product and quotient spaces. Three lecture hours per week. 
    Prerequisite: MAT 221  and MAT 234  .
  
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    MAT 413 Ordinary Differential Equations

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is a study of the methods of solving linear and elementary nonlinear ordinary differential equations.  Topics may include variation of  parameters, series solutions, Laplace transforms and applications. Three lecture hours per week.
    PrerequisiteMAT 304A .
  
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    MAT 414 Linear Algebra II

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is a continuation of Linear Algebra I. Topics include diagonalization, similarity, orthogonality, quadradic forms, inner products, and the singular value decomposition. Applications of these topics will be highlighted. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: MAT 304A .
  
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    MAT 415 Geometric Structures

    3 Credit(s)
    An analysis of various geometric structures, especially projective geometry and its relation to certain algebraic structures. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: MAT303.
  
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    MAT 417 Probability and Mathematical Statistics II

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is an introduction to statistical inference. Topics may include sampling distributions, limit theorems, point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, linear regression and correlation, analysis of variance, and nonparametric methods. Three lecture hours per week.. Prerequisite: MAT 407 .
  
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    MAT 420 Special Problems Seminar

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is a study of field mathematics chosen by the instructor that is not covered in detail in other courses in the Mathematics Department.  Topics chosen are determined by mathematical relevance and the perceived value that would be added to the mathematics curriculum.
    Prerequisite:  MAT 221  and MAT 234 .
  
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    MAT 421 Advanced Calculus

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is a study of functions of several variables, implicit functions and Jacobian determinants, line and surface integrals, and the theorems of Green and Stokes. Three lecture hours per week.
    Prerequisite: MAT 320 .
  
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    MAT 490 Senior Seminar in Mathematics

    3 Credit(s) W W-III
    This course is a culminating experience for the mathematics major. Students will read mathematics journal articles, work problems and prove theorems derived from those articles, study topics independently, give oral presentations and write a mathematical paper. The paper may be expository or original in nature and students will hand in several drafts and make necessary revisions before the final product is completed. In the process, students will need to review and apply skills learned in previous courses as well as independently study new concepts. Students will be exposed to the “nuts and bolts” of doing mathematical research along the way, including using common databases for finding papers and typesetting a paper properly. Three lecture hours per week. Required of all mathematics majors.  Prerequisites: successful completion of the calculus sequence (MAT 220 , MAT 221  and MAT 320 ) MAT 304A , and either MAT 411  or MAT 303A  and a W-II course.
  
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    MAT 500 Directed Study in Mathematics

    3 Credit(s)
    The purpose of this course is to provide the student with an opportunity to explore in depth an area of mathematics that would not ordinarily be encountered in the program of required courses. It is recommended that the student take as many of the required courses as possible before enrolling in Directed Study. Credit for this course may not be applied toward Major requirements. Prerequisites: At least one 400 level math course (with a grade of C or above), Junior or Senior standing, agreement of a Department faculty member to act as supervisor and permission of Mathematics Department Chairperson.
  
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    MAT 520 Mathematics Internship

    3-12 Credit(s)
    An opportunity for students to gain practical or technical training in an industrial/commercial/research environment. The student makes the necessary arrangements with the chosen facility, in consultation with an appropriate faculty member. The internship must meet College Academic Policies (described elsewhere in this Catalog) and Mathematics Department Policy (available in the Mathematics Department). Open only to Junior/Senior Mathematics Majors who have obtained a faculty sponsor for this internship. Prerequisites: Permission of a faculty supervisor and permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    MAT 572 Mathematics Research I

    1-3 Credit(s)
    This course provides qualified students with research direction and the opportunity to participate in independent work in any area of mathematics of special interest to them, provided that a faculty supervisor is available. A paper and poster presentation are required at the end of the course.  This course may be repeated.
    Prerequisites: Permission of the faculty supervisor and the Department Chairperson.

Media Communications

  
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    MEC 500 Directed Study in Media Communications

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides a guided opportunity for advanced students to pursue independent research or individualized projects in depth under the guidance of an assigned faculty advisor. The research project/activity must be approved by the Department Chairperson and meet the Department requirements.

Management

  
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    ENT 220 Entrepreneurship for Non-Business Majors

    3 Credit(s)
    Entrepreneurship for Non-Business Majors and Entrepreneurship minors is designed to assist students majoring in Arts & Sciences, Education and  Human Services to obtain the knowledge base and business skill set to prepare them to open their own small businesses. Topics to be covered include idea generation and opportunity analysis, competitive analysis, development of competitive advantages, building a customer base, cash flow statements and budgets, legal foundations and basics of contracts, financing, production management, basic human resource management, marketing, pricing, ratio analysis, buying a business or franchising, harvest and exit. This course involves hands-on, problem based learning with real world scenarios and exercises.  Students will be challenged to find solutions to problems as seen through the various roles of business owner, marketer, and financial analyst.  Limited to non-business majors and entrepreneurial minors.  Not open to students who have received credit for MGT 220.  Three lecture hours per week.
 

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