Jan 23, 2022  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

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Sport and Movement Science

  
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    SMS 382 Physical Education and Health for Children with Special Needs

    3 Credit(s)


    This course will present legislative interpretation assisting students planning to work with children with special needs. The intent of the course is to familiarize students with the variety of special needs disabilities, which one may encounter in a classroom or client setting. Teaching methodologies will be considered. Three lecture hours per week. Ten hours of field-based experiences in physical education or health and consumer science classrooms are required. Students should have completed one of the following: SFL200, SMS200 , SFL221, or SMS201 . Not open to students who have received credit for SFL324 or SFL324B.

     

     

  
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    SMS 383 Assessment in Physical Education and Education

    3 Credit(s) Q
    This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge of tests, measurements, and elementary statistical techniques. Topics include the construction, selection, and interpretation of evaluative instruments. Emphasis is placed on designing and implementing practical assessments in physical and health education. The course meets for three hours per week and is required of SMS Physical Education and Health Concentrations. Not open to students who have taken SFL323 or SFL323A.
  
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    SMS 385 Teaching Secondary Physical Education

    4 Credit(s)
    This course examines secondary physical education models and effective teaching strategies in middle and high school physical settings.  The examination of secondary curriculum, unit/lesson planning, teaching methodologies, management techniques, legal/ethical responsibilities, and leadership skills. Three lecture hours per week. Course requirements include fifteen hours of field-based experience in secondary physical education classes. Required course in the Physical Education Concentration.  Not open to students who have received credit for SFL322P.
     Prerequisites: SFL198 or SMS 177 , and SFL221 or SMS 201 , and matriculated into the Physical Education Concentration.
  
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    SMS 390 Legal Issues in Sport Science

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to familiarize the student with legal terminology, laws and regulations, and current issues dealing with sport science. Students will become familiar with the legal concepts in the areas that they are most likely to encounter in the workplace. Three lecture hours per week. SMS major elective. Required for Sport Management, Elementary and Secondary Physical Education, Fitness/Wellness, and Recreation Management Concentrations and Coaching and Sport Management Minors. Not open to students who have received credit for SFL327B.
  
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    SMS 391 Financial Aspects of Sport Industries

    3 Credit(s)
    Sport has become a major industry within the national economy. As such sport industries contribute to the shaping of our national economy. Particular attention will be given to such areas as economic theory and perspectives related to the sport industries; economic impact of television, venues, and events; budgeting principles; and fiscal control. Three lecture hours per week. SMS major elective. Required for Sport Management Concentration and Sport Management Minor. Open to all students. Recommended for Junior year. Not open to students who have received credit for SFL329. Prerequisites:       and ECO 202 .
  
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    SMS 392 Ethics and Communication in Sport Management

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of various leadership skills, with a strong emphasis placed upon the ethical and communication proficiencies necessary to be an effective sport manager. Emphasis will be placed upon ethical theories and responsibilities as they apply to the sport management setting, as well as how to effectively communicate a course of action based upon ethical principles. Interactions and information exchange both internal and external to the sport organization will also be examined. Three lecture hours per week. Required for Sport Management Concentration. Not open to students who have received credit for SFL376. Prerequisites: SFL220B or SMS 290 , SFL242 or SMS 291 , SFL327B or SMS 390 , and SFL329 or SMS 391 .
  
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    SMS 396 Directed Field Experience in Sport Management

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to offer the student an applied experience in the sport industry, based on site approval. Performed on or in close proximity to the campus, the field experience will provide the opportunity for the student to observe and assist another professional. A minimum of one hundred and thirty-five (135) field hours required. Required for Sport Management Concentration. Recommended for Junior year. Not open to students who have received credit for SFL326A. Prerequisites: SFL220B or SMS 290 , SFL242 or SMS 291 , and SFL327B or SMS 390 .
  
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    SMS 400 Special Topics in Sport & Movement Science

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides an opportunity for intensive study in a selected area of Sport & Movement Science. Topics will vary from semester to semester, and will be announced in advance. Three hours per week. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SMS 402 Study-Travel Seminar in SMS

    3 Credit(s)
    This is a study/travel course concerning selected sport or recreation issues or problems based in a specific region followed by intensive field study in the area concerned.  Topic varies.  Three-six lecture hours per week depending on credit load.  Focus may be on regions in the United States or international areas. Course repeatable with permission of the Department Chairperson.  Additional course fees may be associated with this course.
  
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    SMS 420 Aquatic Therapy

    3 Credit(s)
    Students will gain knowledge and skills to work with clients in the water for swimming, exercise, and leisure. Current research and protocols will be reviewed for clients with diabetes, arthritis, pregnancy, or orthopedic injuries and more. Legislation and risk management will be addressed. Use of special equipment and communication systems will be introduced. Three lecture/lab hours per week are required, plus a 10 hour field experience. Required for Aquatic Management specialization in the Recreation Management Concentration. Major elective. Open to all students who have not received credit for SFL213B. Prerequisites: One of the following: SFL152 or  , or SFL291 or  , and SFL215B or  , or permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    SMS 421 Water Safety Instructor

    3 Credit(s)
    This course trains candidates to teach American Red Cross swimming, diving and water safety courses within a minimum of 36 hours of active participation.  Considerable practice teaching is required for certification. Three lecture/lab hours per week plus field trip. Required of Aquatic Management specialization in the Recreation Management Concentration. Major elective. Open to all students who have not received credit for SFL490A. CORI/SORI required.
  
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    SMS 425 Directed Field Experience in Aquatic Management

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to offer the student the opportunity for practical experience in the field of aquatics. Seminars will be held regularly to allow students to discuss and analyze their experience. Minimum of seventy-five hours required. Recreation Management Concentration elective. Not open to students who have previously received credit for SFL410.
  
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    SMS 435 Directed Field Experience in Coaching

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to expose the student to the many aspects of coaching. The student will be able to observe and assist and will have the opportunity to analyze his/her experiences under the supervision of a varsity coach. Requirement for Coaching Minor and Certificate programs. Field-based experience and seminars will be included. Minimum of one hundred and thirty-five (135) hours required. Not open to those who have received credit for SFL430A. Prerequisites: SMS 230 , SFL250A or SMS 231 , SFL331A or SMS 331 , and SFL327B or SMS 390 .
  
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    SMS 452 Exercise Physiology II

    4 Credit(s) Q
    This course will focus on fitness assessment and exercise considerations for special populations.  The effects of exercise on the process of aging from childhood through life cycle will be examined.  The special needs of those individuals with various medical conditions will be explored with regards to race and gender.  Research in the areas of exercise physiology and medicine will serve as resources for the development of safe and effective exercise programs for individuals with special needs.  Special topics will include exercise at altitude and exercise prescription for versus fitness.  The course will meet for three lecture  hours and two laboratory hours per week.  Laboratory experience will introduce students to appropriate measurement techniques in exercise physiology with special populations and focus on graded exercise testing.  Required of Exercise Science concentration students.  Prerequisites: SMS 174 , SMS 350 , SMS 352  and ATR 356 .
     
  
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    SMS 455 Directed Field Experience in Fitness/wellness

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity for practical experience in an approved fitness/wellness facility. (A minimum of 8 hours per week, 112 hours total per semester). Required of and restricted to Fitness/Wellness Concentration/Minor students. Not open to students who have received credit for SFL440 or SFL440A. Prerequisites: SFL261 or SMS 260 , SFL373 or SMS 373A , and SFL340A or SMS 350 .
  
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    SMS 460 Teaching Methods and Materials in Health/Family and Consumer Sciences

    3 Credit(s)


    The course emphasizes teaching methodologies for all grade levels. Consideration of materials applicable to health/family and consumer science, evaluation techniques, discipline techniques, preparation of teaching units and bibliographies; and a survey of current literature in the field. Three lecture hours per week. Course requirements include fifteen (15) hours of field-based experience in health education classes with grades (PreK-12). Required for Health Education Teacher Education concentration. Not open to students who have received credit for SFL360 or SFL360B.
    Prerequisites: SFL198 or SMS177 , and SFL200 or SMS200 , and SFL261 or SMS260 , and matriculation in the Health and Consumer Science Concentration.

     

     

     

  
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    SMS 465A Directed Field Experience in Health/Family and Consumer Science

    3 Credit(s)


    This course is designed to offer the student an applied experience in a health education setting. Through assignments, the student will gain direct experience in the field of health education. A minimum of seventy-five (75) hours is required, which includes field based experience and seminar meetings. Not open to students who have received credit for SFL443 or SFL443B or SMS465.
    Prerequisites: SMS460  

     

     

  
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    SMS 471 Environmental Education

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is intended to provide a general overview toward an understanding of the philosophies, theories, and methods common to the process of environmental education. Students will apply their knowledge through the development and presentation of environmental education lesson plans in classroom and applied settings. Three lecture hours per week. This course serves as an SMS major elective and a Recreation Management Concentration elective. Open to all students.
  
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    SMS 475 Directed Field Experience in Recreation Management

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to provide the student with an opportunity for practical experience in the field of recreation. Seminars will be held regularly to allow students to discuss and analyze their experiences in the field of recreation. Minimum of eight hours per week and additional required seminars. Open only to students in the Recreation Management Concentration/Minor. Required for Recreation & Park specialization. Not open to students who have received credit for SFL470. Prerequisite: SFL270 or  .
  
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    SMS 476 Senior Seminar in Exercise Science

    2 Credit(s)
    Senior Seminar is a capstone course in the Exercise Science concentration, bridging the foundational curricular experience with professional preparedness and/or professional certification. Senior Seminar involves directed preparation for the ACSM-HFS or NSCA-CSCS certification Exam. Students will build a resume and professional portfolio. Fulfills Capstone requirement in Exercise Science concentration. Restricted to Exercise Science concentration students. Prerequisite: SMS355 .
  
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    SMS 477 Research Experience in Exercise Science

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to provide the student with practical experience conducting research in Exercise Science under the supervision of a faculty member. Students must first seek out a supervising professor with whom they wish to collaborate in 1) an already exiting research project (encouraged), or 2) the creation of a new research project. Thus, SMS447 will feature a collection of different students working with different professors, collaborating on different qualitative or quantitative research projects at different stages of development. This course meets three hours per week. Required of SMS Exercise Science students in Research track. Prerequisite: SMS281 . Co-requisite: IDS375 .
  
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    SMS 478 Senior Research Project in Exercise Science

    3 Credit(s)


    Senior Research Project is a capstone course for students in the Exercise Science concentration, melding together their foundational studies, knowledge, skills and abilities.  The primary focus consists of conducting a research project. Students will be required to submit their work for publication or presentation. This course fulfills the capstone requirement in the Exercise Science concentration. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: It is restricted to Exercise Science concentration students. IDS375 , SMS350 , and SMS477 .

     

  
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    SMS 480 Philosophical Aspects of Physical Education

    3 Credit(s) W-III
    This course examines the development of physical education philosophies from the Greek culture to the present, through a series of reading and writing assignments. Philosophies of physical education and governing organizations will be included. Contemporary learning theories and curriculum development will be studied in relation to teaching philosophies. Instructor and peer discussions will assist students through the process of developing a philosophy of physical education statement. Three lecture hours per week. The course is required for students in the Physical Education concentrations Elementary and Secondary. Prerequisites: W-II course, and SMS 380  or SMS 385  or EDC/SMS 780.
  
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    SMS 482 Advanced Concepts in Adapted Physical Education

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will provide students with the theory, principles, and methods of appropriate delivery in helping individuals with disabilities enjoy the full spectrum of activities associated with sport, fitness, and movement-related programs. Professional standards needed to deliver appropriate physical education services to students with disabilities will be covered. The course will prepare the student to take the Adapted Physical Education National Standards certification examination. Three lecture hours per week. Course requirements include fifteen hours of a field based experience. SMS Major elective. Physical Education Concentration elective. Prerequisite:  .
  
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    SMS 485 Directed Field Experience in Physical Education

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides a concentrated exposure in elementary or secondary physical education classes. Through assignments, the student will gain direct experience in the field of physical education. A minimum of seventy-five hours is required, which includes field-based experience and seminar meetings. Required course for and restricted to students in the Elementary and Secondary Physical Education Concentrations. Not open to students who have previously received credit for SFL420. Prerequisites: SFL198 or SMS 177 , and SFL321P, 321R, SMS 380 , SFL322P or SMS 385 , and matriculated into the Elementary or Secondary Physical Education Concentrations.
  
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    SMS 490 Facility and Event Management in Sport industries

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of principles and practices specifically related to sport facility and event management. Predominant areas of focus will include facility design, funding, financial impact, trends, risk management, crowd management, and event planning, staffing, and organization. Three lecture hours per week. Major elective. Required for Sport Management and Recreation Management Concentrations. Recommended for Senior year. Not open to students who have received credit for SFL448. Recommended prior courses: SFL220B or  , SFL242 or  , SFL327B or  , and SFL329 or  .
  
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    SMS 491A High Performance Management

    4 Credit(s)
    This course examines principles and successful international practices of sport managers in their pursuit to provide participants with a gradual path to excellence. Content will include systems of coaching, facilities, competitions, qualification, talent identification, and athlete development. These integrated systems reflect an emerging global model of high performance management that drives mass participation. Four lecture hours per week. Major elective. Required for Sport Management Concentration. Recommended for senior year. Not open to students who have received credit for SMS491.
  
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    SMS 495 Senior Seminar in Sport Management

    3 Credit(s) W
    This course serves as a capstone for the Sport Management Concentration. It integrates current information to prepare students to enter the sport industry. Developing a professional, and personal philosophy of sport management will be covered. Additionally, resumes, job searches, graduate school programs and entry-level job requirements and expectations will be addressed. Three lecture hours per week. Required for Sport Management Concentration. Not open to students who have received credit for SFL455A. Prerequisites: SFL220B or SMS 290 , SFL242 or SMS 291 , SFL431A or SMS 302 , SFL327B or SMS 390 , SFL329 or SMS 391 , SFL376 or SMS 392 , and SFL326A or SMS 396 . Senior status and permission of Department Chair.
  
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    SMS 500 Directed Study in Sport & Movement Science

    0.5-3 Credit(s)
    This is an independent study in an area of special interest in Sport and Movement Science. Prior to registration, a proposal must be submitted and approved by the instructor and the Department Chairperson. Repeatable once for a maximum of six credits.
  
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    SMS 520 Aquatic Management Internship

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to offer the student practical experience in areas directly related to the student’s academic and career interests. Students will be placed with various public and private agencies. Minimum of 16 hours per week, with additional required seminars. Open to SMS students only. Required for the Aquatic Management specialization in the Recreation Management Concentration. Not open to students who have received credit for SFL510. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: SFL410 or  .
  
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    SMS 550 Fitness/wellness Internship

    3-12 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to offer a student placement in an approved career-related public or private fitness/wellness agency. Elective for and restricted to Fitness/Wellness Concentration/Minor students. Minimum of eight hours per week per three credits, with additional required seminars. Not open to students who have received credit for SFL540A. Prerequisite: SFL440A or SMS 455 .
  
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    SMS 570A Recreation Management Internship

    12 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to offer the student practical experience in areas directly related to the student’s career interests. Students will be placed with various public and private agencies. A minimum of 400 hours required. Required for Recreation & Park specialization in the Recreation Management Concentration. Not open to students who have received credit for SFL570 or SMS570. Prerequisite: SFL470 or  ,   or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SMS 572 Leisure Services Internship

    12 Credit(s) CEA
    While working in front line roles at Walt Disney World Theme Parks and Resorts, participants will learn transferable skills, and gain real-world experience at a Fortune 100 company. Participants on the Disney College Program also custom design a learning curriculum that best suits their needs and interests, including one college ACE eligible course, one professional development seminar, and specialized learning activities. Integral to the live and learn experience is the opportunity for students to meet, work and live with people from all over the world. Acceptance by Disney into the College program is required.
  
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    sms 580 Internship in Exercise Science

    6 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to offer a student placement and applied experience in an approved career-related public or private facility within a sub-discipline of Exercise Science.  Required of and restricted to Exercise Science Concentration students.  200 hours total per semester with additional required seminars.  Not open to students who have received credit for SFL540A. Prerequisite: SMS 355 .
  
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    SMS 590 Sport Management Internship

    12 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to offer the student an applied experience in the sport industry, based on site approval. This is actual field experience in a sport management setting in which management practices are applied. A minimum of four hundred (400) hours required. Required for Sport Management Concentration. Not open to students who have received credit for SFL550. Prerequisites: SFL220B or SMS 290 , SFL242 or SMS 291 , SFL326A or SMS 396 , SFL327B or SMS 390 , SFL329 or SMS 391 , SFL376 or SMS 392 , SFL431A or SMS 302 , SFL448 or SMS 490 , SFL455A or SMS 495 , and SMS 491A , or permission of Department Chairperson.

Sociology

  
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    SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology

    3 Credit(s) DIII V CS WC
    The student considers human beings and their cultures as revealed in their customs and institutions. The classroom approach combines theory and research with current literature to provide a concrete, reality-oriented foundation for the study of sociology. The course will consider social problems, including racism and sexism in America and other societies, to enable the student to see practical applications of sociological principles. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for SOC 201.
  
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    SOC 110H Introduction to Sociology-Honors

    3 Credit(s) DIII V CS WC
    This course focuses on human interactions and world cultures through the study of social customs and social institutions, The classroom approach combines theory and research methods to provide an empirically-oriented foundation for the study of sociology. This course will consider the linkages among the individual, social groups, and social institutions, with a focus on issues such as race, class and gender. Students will explore issues in contemporary societies through the use of primary source material. Three lecture hours per week.  Open only to students in the Honors Program and Sociology majors with a 3.0 grade point average. Not open to students who have received credit for SOC 202H.
  
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    SOC 150 Introduction to Anthropology

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Examines principles of physical and cultural anthropology: origins, evolution and diversity of people and culture. Includes cross-cultural analyses of social institutions (family, government, economics), gender roles, race, language, religion and stratification. Three lecture hours per week. Required for all Sociology majors. Not open to students who have received credit for SOC 330. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or SOC 201 or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 204 Introduction to Social Science

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course provides a basic familiarity with the techniques, attitudes, careers, philosophies and personalities of the social sciences. Major research assignments (papers, media presentation, etc.) are required. Case studies in American cultural development are extensively utilized to explore the variety and depth of the subject. Students are assigned extensive readings in primary research areas. Emphasis is on qualitative-literary research. Three lecture hours per week. Required for all Sociology Majors.
  
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    SOC 206 Statistics for the Social Sciences

    3 Credit(s) DIII Q QR


    This course is designed to introduce students to the use of statistical analyses in social and behavioral sciences. The basic goal is to help students understand, apply, and interpret basic social statistics. This class will introduce students to the most common methods of summarizing and presenting data (descriptive statistics). Students also will learn how to make estimates about a population based on a sample (inferential statistics). Using both manual calculations and computer-based exercises and manipulation of datasets, students will learn the fundamental techniques of statistical analysis. Three lecture hours per week and laboratory work outside of class.
    Prerequisites: MAT108  or a higher-level math course, or permission of department chairperson.

     

     

  
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    SOC 210 Social Thought I: Established Thought

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course considers the broad spectrum of thought and ideas directed through history toward the nature of society and humanity’s place within the social framework. The course primarily examines historical and contemporary examples of accepted or “establishment” thought as expressed by a variety of social philosophers as well as sociologists. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for SOC 300.  Prerequisite: SOC 110  or SOC 201 or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 211 Social Thought II: Rebel Thought

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course examines the nature of society and the place humanity holds within it from both an historical and contemporary standpoint. The course is concerned primarily with an examination of varieties of thought contrary to, or directed against, the accepted social views of the times in which they arise. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for SOC 301.  Prerequisite: SOC 110  or SOC 201 or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 217 Gender and Society

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course will identify the assumptions and presuppositions we make about gender in society, identify their sources, and consider the impact they have on individuals, groups and social institutions. We will discern how societies produce gender, the distinction between sex and gender, and the social impact of gender stereotypes. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to student who have received credit for SOC 317.  Prerequisite: SOC 110  or SOC 201 or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 220 Introduction to the Sociology of Children

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course provides an overview of main issues in the Sociology of Children. Students will learn how sociological concepts such as roles, status, norms, socialization, institutions, power socialization, research methodology, and theoretical analysis apply to the study of children. They will also gain an understanding of the current state of children organizations, policies, funding, and practices. Analysis of both macro and micro issues will be included. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    SOC 232 Marriage, Family and Intimate Relationships

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Analysis of the American family as a social institution. Historical development, adaptation to values and goals of societal and cultural milieu, effects of social change. Three lecture hours per week. Requirement for B.S. Sociology, Gerontology option. Not open to students who have received credit for SOC 332. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or SOC 201 or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 233 Peoples of India

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course examines the nature and diversity of the people inhabiting the Indian subcontinent. Topics such as the Hindu-Muslim dichotomy and the British occupation are explored within the context of the historical development of India’s population. Emphasis is given to the influence of contemporary religious and social and political events upon the nation’s unique demographic composition. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for SOC 333. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or SOC 201 or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 234 Myth, Ritual and Society

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course explores myth and ritual in social systems around the world and across time. It focuses on myths and their meanings, relations between myth, rituals, and social systems, and social scientific explanation of myth and ritual. Students will be expected to work independently and cooperatively on several projects. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for SOC 334.  Prerequisite: SOC 110  or SOC 201 or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 238 Sub-Saharan Africa: From Colonialism to Post-Colonialism

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    An introduction of the socio-cultural context of present-day Africa with emphasis on ethnicity (tribalism). The interaction of the various African forces with the Western colonialist powers is investigated. The role and contribution of the various liberation movements - ANC, FRELIMO, SAPO, PALGC, ZAPU, MPLA - to African independence are also assessed. The intent is to project an objective picture of the peoples of Africa. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for SOC 338. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or SOC 201 or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 240 Social Problems in the U.S.

    3 Credit(s) DIII CS WC
    This course examines the social conditions that contribute to social problems from a critical and comparative global perspective. Students will develop an understanding of how social problems are constructed, their core causes across and within different regions and countries, and how specific problems can be mitigated from both a social structural and an individual perspective. Sociological theories and paradigms will be applied in a critical and comparative in-depth analysis of a broad series of social problems, which may include globalization, poverty, discrimination, crime, health, environment issues, war and terrorism. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    SOC 242 Principles of Criminology

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    The development of theories of criminality; extent and typology of crime in the United States. Changing attitudes toward the criminal and their effects upon the field of corrections; the effects of social change upon the climate of violence in society. Three lecture hours per week. Open only to Juniors and Seniors. Not open to students who have received credit for SOC 342.  Prerequisite: SOC 110  or SOC 201 or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 246 Social Deviance

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Examination and analysis of advanced theory on the social process by which behavior becomes defined as deviant. Particular attention is given to the normative system as it applies to culture and problematic areas within the system. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for SOC 346.  Prerequisite: SOC 110  or SOC 201 or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 250 Public Sociology

    3 Credit(s) W-II
    This course will introduce students to the core concepts, assumptions, and strategies employed by public sociologists. Although the discipline of sociology has maintained a longtime commitment to social justice and equity, there has been considerable debate in the field about how to achieve these ends. Some sociologists argue that producing high quality social science research is sufficient to meet this commitment. Others, including public sociologists, both encourage and engage in more direct community engagement and activism. These activities sometimes take the shape of formal and informal educational activities, community engaged research efforts, accessible writing across multiple genres, and community organizing activities. This course will explore the history of community and activist engagement among sociologists and will provide multiple examples of contemporary public sociology efforts, including but not limited to films, photography, performances, digital writing, and community-oriented policy work. Through both informal and formal writing assignments, students will have an opportunity to reflect on the practice of public sociology and learn how to communicate social science research to various publics. This course fulfills the WII core requirement for non-sociology majors. Three lecture hours per week.  
    Prerequisites: SOC110  or SOC201 or permission of Department Chairperson, and Level I writing (W-I)
     
  
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    SOC 303 African Civilization in the New World

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    An introduction to the African culture in the New World. Emphasis is on the United States and the Caribbean, with cursory looks at Latin America and Canada. This survey intends to acquaint the student with the rich socio-cultural background of the contemporary African living in the areas known as the New World. Three lecture hours per week. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 305 The Black Family in the U.S.

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Course centers on the career of the Black family in the United States. Emphasis is on Black child care, self-concept, and acquisition of mechanisms that will insure the survival and well being of the Black person in a hostile environment. The role of the Black woman as the traditional pillar of the Black community constitutes the main focus of the course. Three lecture hours per week. Offered in alternate years. Recommended for Women’s Studies Minor. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 306 The Black Woman

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    The course explores the socio-economic institutions which have helped shape the situation of the Black woman in the United States and considers the importance of class, race and gender in this process. Because of the relationship of the Black woman to the Black family and Black community, any discussion of the Black woman is incomplete without addressing these two institutions. Emphasis will also be put on the Black woman in Africa and the Caribbean. Three lecture hours per week. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 309 The Black Religious Experience

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Religion as a social institution among Blacks: origins, structure and function, its unique style as an adaptation to its place in American society, its role in social change, e.g., the Civil Rights movement. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    SOC 310 Education and Society

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course examines the functions and structures of the varying forms of educational processes in contemporary society. Emphasis is given to the development and direction of informal and institutionalized education in America, the differing patterns of education, which have evolved within other societies and cultures, and the links between education and social order. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 313 Sociology of Aging

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Study of major sociological, psychological, and physiological processes of aging. Analysis includes overall view of aging theories and review of research and empirical studies relating to each. Implications for the future in terms of employment, welfare, retirement and political power. Three lecture hours per week. Requirement for B.S. Sociology, Gerontology option. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 314 On Death and Dying

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Many of society’s more traditional institutions are becoming aware of their difficulty in handling human death. This course attempts to review some of these institutions, such as the hospital, the church, the funeral home, and the family. The objective of this course is to acquire a deeper understanding of the inseparable relationship existing between styles of living and the fact of dying. The way we live life and the way society establishes values provide clear insight into the quality of understanding death. Three lecture hours per week. Requirement for B.S. Sociology, Gerontology option.
  
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    SOC 316 Religion and Society

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course studies religion from a sociological perspective and deals with the role of the sacred in society and in the lives of individuals. Topics include myth and belief, conversion, organization and leadership; primitive and non-Western religion; and contemporary issues such as church and state, religious fundamentalism, cults, Black and Hispanic churches, social justice advocacy, etc. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 318 Women, Globalization, and Development

    3 Credit(s) WC W-II
    This course examines women and social change in different social, cultural, economic and political systems of the world to develop an understanding of the status of women in different cultural contexts and how women’s statuses have changed over time. In the last half of the twentieth century, globalization has greatly transformed the social organization of many societies.  Women in the Global South such as parts of Asia (except Japan), Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, and the Middle East have been impacted by these global social forces and should be studied as part of an interdependent world. The role of the United Nations’ Commission on the status of Women (CSW) in advocating for gender equality throughout the world also will be studied. Three lecture hours per week.  Prerequisite:  .
  
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    SOC 320 Violence and Children

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course will explore macro and micro forms of abuse and violence as they pertain to children. Children have long been the recipients of a variety of forms of abuse and violence. This course will review the history of child abuse, including physical, sexual, emotional, verbal abuse. Contemporary forms of violence to be explored include domestic violence, social violence, bullying, gangs, terrorism, war, and the routine socialization of children for violence. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or SOC 220  or permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 331 Cultures of the American Frontier

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    A sociological/anthropological analysis of the diverse cultures of the American Frontier. Special emphasis is placed on the Native American and the groups with which the Native American interacted. Subculture, class, stratification and normative dynamics are studied. Offered in alternate years. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 335 Peoples and Cultures of the Caribbean

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Analysis of the present socio-economic structures of the Caribbean countries, with emphasis upon the historical processes that account for their chronic state of underdevelopment. An in-depth study of the major nations of the area is attempted in an effort to arrive at a Caribbean ideal type. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 336 Northern European Cultures

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    A comparison between widely contrasting cultures of Northern Europe, with special attention to Russia, Scandinavia, England, Scotland and Ireland. Emphasis is placed upon family patterns, housing, the arts, urban and rural problems, minorities, and political contrasts. Extensive use is made of audio-visual materials. Three lecture hours per week. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 339 Peoples of Africa II

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Course focuses on the Southern African continent with emphasis on socio-cultural relations among the people who live in the region. The relation of the social structure to oppression is analyzed. An effort is made to put the new developments in the area in their proper perspective and students are encouraged to do an in-depth case study of countries such as Zimbabwe, Namibia, Mozambique, Angola, Tanzania and Azania. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 341 Urban Sociology

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Historical and social development of the city in the U.S. (central city, suburbia, metropolitan area) together with international comparisons. Urban issues such as race, class, politics, poverty, crime, housing, transportation, etc. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 343 Juvenile Delinquency

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    An analysis of the social, psychological, legal approaches to causation, prevention, treatment, and control of crimes committed by minors. Special emphasis is given to juvenile delinquency as related to socio-economic status. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 344 Law and Society: Sociology of Law

    3 Credit(s)
    A critical examination of the ways in which social values are formalized within judicial and legislative institutions. The focus of the course is directed toward the establishment of legal norms and their impact on normative imperatives from a social perspective. Class discussions and case studies are an integral part of the course. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 345 Race and Ethnicity in Society

    3 Credit(s) DIII V
    This course examines the ways race and ethnicity matter in society and the consequences of this for people’s lives. Racial and ethnic conflicts have played, and continue to play a central role in American life. Even as overt racial conflicts have diminished, racial inequalities persist, and at times have widened. We will examine why this continues to happen and what can be done to reduce racial inequalities.
  
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    SOC 347 Social Inequality: Race, Class and Gender

    3 Credit(s) CS
    This course provides an introduction to the study of social inequality. An analysis of the structure and dynamics of social inequality, focusing upon competing theoretical explorations and empirical investigation of different arrangements by which wealth, power, and prestige are distributed in human societies. We will examine the process of inter-generational mobility , explore the influence of contextual or structural factors on the process of mobility, assess differences by race and gender in the process of mobility, and compare the level of mobility experienced in the U.S. to other countries. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 348 Hispanic Groups in the U.S.

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    The culture, social structure and institutions of the major groups of Hispanic origin currently found in the U.S. (Puerto Ricans, Cuban-Americans, Mexican-Americans and others). The relationship of these groups to American society as a whole. Contemporary issues such as discrimination, bilingual/bicultural education, undocumented aliens and immigration legislation. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 349 Health, Illness and the Body

    3 Credit(s)
    This course explores the social factors that influence the delivery and consumption of medical and health care in the United States. The roles of medicine and of the health care provider and the patient are examined in a variety of settings. Specific issues confronting American medicine are considered, and the health care delivery system is compared with systems from other countries. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 350 Sociological Theory I: Classical Theory

    3 Credit(s)
    This course, primarily for Sociology Majors, surveys the development of the major concepts and schools of sociological theory, emphasizing the origins of theory in the works of the “classical” European writers of the 18th and 19th century. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Junior standing and 12 hours of Sociology; or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 351 Sociological Theory II: Contemporary Theory

    3 Credit(s)
    This course, primarily for Sociology Majors, surveys the development of the major concepts and schools of sociological theory, emphasizing recent and contemporary theory in the works of modern European and American writers. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: Junior standing and 12 hours of Sociology; or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 352 Sociology of Organizations

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Course analyzes the dynamics and characteristics of complex organizations (i.e., public and political structures, corporations, schools, hospitals, churches) and their impact upon individuals and society. The following topics are explored: Theories and history of organizations, organizational role behavior, formal and informal structure, class, power, motivation, control, bureaucracy, organizational success, pathology, and case studies. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 370 Seminar: Issues in the Sociology of Children

    3 Credit(s)
    This capstone class for students with a child studies cognate will provide them the opportunity to focus on a particular area of inquiry for the term. They will read a core set of materials, discuss them, conduct research on the seminar topic and present their findings to the class in both written and verbal form. When completed, students will have demonstrated skills that will prepare them for the marketplace or for further educational pursuits. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or SOC 220  or permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 382 Seminar: Topics in Sociology

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides the advanced student with the opportunity for intensive research and study in a selected area of sociology. The topics and instructors will vary from semester to semester. Three hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for SOC 550.  Prerequisites: Junior standing and 12 hours of Sociology; or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 390 Community Involvement

    3 Credit(s)
    Academic credits may be earned for community service projects as approved by the Sociology Department Chairperson. Normally restricted to Sociology, Social Work, Nursing and Political Science majors in their Junior or Senior year. Other students who have specific community projects may be admitted with the permission of Department Chairperson. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis unless prior and specific arrangements are made. Fieldwork and appointments with instructor replace lectures. A maximum of six credits may be earned with no more than 3 credits taken in any given semester. Not open to students who have received 3.0 or more credits for SOC 401.
  
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    SOC 403 Research Methods in the Social Sciences

    3 Credit(s) W


    This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of social research by presenting different research methods employed by social scientist.  This includes interviews, surveys, ethnography/field research, experiments, and content/text analysis, among other methodologies.  This class will focus on the logic and practice of researching design, the relationship between theory and research, forms of data collection, the ethics of research, data analysis, and the writing of research proposals and empirical papers.  We will explore the strengths and weaknesses of the different methods, and will combine research theory with practical skills.  Three lecture hours per week. Requirement for Sociology majors. This course fulfills the W-III core requirement.
    Prerequisites: W-II, SOC206 , Junior standing and 12 hours of Sociology; or permission of Department Chairperson.

     

     

     

  
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    SOC 404 Data Analysis

    3 Credit(s)
    The objective of this course is to provide students with skills in data analysis and interpretation as crucial steps in the research process. Knowledge of social science theory; research methods, statistics, and computer programs gained in previous courses is applied by working with available data. Three lecture hours per week. Requirement for B.S. Sociology, Computer Science and Research options, B.S. Criminal Justice, Research and Planning Concentration. Prerequisites: Senior standing and 12 hours of Sociology including SOC 206 ; or permission of Department Chairperson. Not open to students who have received credit for SOC 361.
  
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    SOC 405 Grant Writing and Evaluation Research in the Social Sciences

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will provide students with two important sets of skills that are basic to the proficiency required by professional sociologists as well as students in such fields as education and human services. Course will set forth the fundamentals of grant writing and the process of obtaining federal, state and foundation grants. The second focus will be to provide students with the fundamental skills and concepts needed to conduct evaluation research. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for SOC 365. Prerequisite: SOC 110  or SOC 206  or by permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 412 Directed Studies in African-American Studies

    3 Credit(s)
    An in-depth exploration of the fundamentals of African-American studies. The course is designed to help students explore, in their own style, the major theories and issues in the study of the Black experience. A final paper is required in addition to weekly meetings and discussions. Prerequisites: Four courses in African-American Studies. Open to African American Studies minors and to others by permission of Department Chairperson. Not open to students who have received credit for SOC 512.
  
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    SOC 420 Internship in Sociology

    3 Credit(s)
    Extensive and valuable sociological involvement: field experience in agency, institution or business setting. Interns must be available 8-10 hours per week including regular meetings with the Chairperson. A journal and final report must be submitted for evaluation in addition to an evaluation by field supervisor. Open only to Sociology Majors in Junior or Senior year. Not open to students who have received credit for SOC 520. Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 430 Directed Study in Sociology

    3 Credit(s)
    An individualized program involving study in depth of some aspect of sociology or social service, under the direction of a faculty member of the Sociology Department. Research papers required. Students must present a proposal for approval at a Department meeting and later defend their research and conclusions at a subsequent meeting of the Department. Not open to students who have received credit for SOC 530.  Prerequisites: Junior standing and 12 hours of Sociology; or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    SOC 470 Capstone Seminar in Sociology

    3.0 Credit(s)
    The capstone seminar is an intense culminating intellectual experience that creates the opportunity for students to review and apply their knowledge of the field through discussion of topics representative of the core areas of the discipline.  Department faculty members will each attend a session of the class to facilitate a discussion in their area of expertise.  In this course students will reflect on the field and will synthesize their knowledge of the core areas to select the theoretical perspective that best represents their point of view.  Students will also assemble, finalize, and submit a portfolio of the work they have done during their tenure in the department.  Student participation in class discussions, the content of the portfolio, and journal reflections on their experiences in the course will be the basis for the grade in the course.  Open only to Sociology Majors in their senior year.  Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who have received credit for SOC 570.  Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chairperson.

Speech

  
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    SPC 101A Oral Communication: Personal and Professional

    3 Credit(s) OC
    This course is designed to provide an opportunity for the student to experience the knowledge and skills necessary for effective communication with other individuals on a day-to-day basis. The emphasis will be on becoming more aware of self and others in both public presentations and in interpersonal communication settings. This course satisfies the oral communication core requirement. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    SPC 101B Oral Communication for Business

    3 Credit(s) OC
    This course is designed to provide an opportunity for the student to learn about communication in the business world. The emphasis will be on such technical speaking experiences as preparing and presenting reports, conducting interviews, and employing leadership, team-building, and sales techniques. This course satisfies the oral communication core requirement. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    SPC 101E ESL Oral Communication: Personal & Professional

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to provide an opportunity for the Non Native Speaker to gain experience in the art of public speaking as it applies to personal and professional life. Presentation skills, audience analysis, speech organization and critical thinking are developed. This course also emphasizes American English pronunciation and listening. ESL Oral Communication satisfies the oral communication core requirement.  Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    SPC 101O Oral Communication in Multimedia Environments

    3 Credit(s) OC
    This course is designed to provide an opportunity for the student to gain experience in the art of oral communication in its broadest sense, as it applies to everyday life in electronic environments. Oral exercises, class discussions, and speeches will cover the steps necessary for effective audience analysis, message preparation, and delivery as well as effective online interpersonal communication.  In online sections students are required to record presentations in front of a live audience. This course satisfies the oral communication core requirement. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    SPC 101S Oral Communication for Civic Engagement & Social Justice

    3 Credit(s) V OC
    This course is designed to give students a broad overview about communication strategies in civic engagement and using the best communication practices to enact social justice/change. The course lectures, materials, and activities are designed to engage students in authentic and compelling dialogue about critical social issues found within the local, national or international contexts.  Students will be expected to deliver speeches, lead discussions, critically analyze issues, and critique their own work, as well as that of others. This course satisfies the oral communication core requirement. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    SPC 101W Oral Communication: Spoken Word

    3 Credit(s) OC
    This course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to create original solo writing and performance that examines the way a creative artist engages contemporary social and political problems. Through in-depth study of monologue, poetry, lyrics, and the history of spoken word, the student will learn creative expression and the art of social and political engagement. Presentation skills, audience analysis, speech organization, and critical thinking are developed. This course satisfies the oral communication core requirement. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    SPC 102H Public Speaking-Honors

    3 Credit(s) OC
    This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of persuasion and argumentation in contemporary life. This course includes analysis of persuasive techniques used in the mass media and of arguments applied to political and social issues. Emphasis will be placed on the development of each student’s ability to express, advocate, and defend a point of view. This course satisfies the oral communication core requirement. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    SPC 202 Interpersonal Communication

    3 Credit(s) OC
    This course will provide an overview of the basic theories and principles of interpersonal communication and will provide the student with an understanding of human interaction in a social world. This course explores communication competence, perception of self and others, nonverbal communication, language, listening, relationship building and relational contexts. Student will be given the opportunity to become more competent and empowered communicators. This course satisfies the oral communication core requirement. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    SPC 204 Group Communication and Team Building

    3 Credit(s) OC
    This course explores the creative processes involved in small group communication, group dynamics, and team building. Students will be involved in individual and team projects designed to enhance their interpersonal, organizational, and group problem-solving skills.This course satisfies the oral communication core requirement  Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    SPC 207 Voice and Professional Speech

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to improve the speaking voice through vocal training and practice. Students practice exercises involving standard pronunciation, articulation, vocal quality, pitch, volume and rate. The goal of this course is to develop each student’s voice for greater effectiveness in personal and professional speaking situations. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    SPC 209N Argumentation and Debate

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides an overview of the theories and concepts associated with argumentation and advocacy in communicative situations. Students learn to think critically and to argue constructively based on learning how argumentation is tied to both the construction of their own arguments and the evaluation of arguments by others. Students are given opportunities to experience and apply argumentation concepts and theories via academic debate, presenting oral arguments and field research. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: SPC101 or  .
  
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    SPC 211 Oral Presentation of Literature

    3 Credit(s)
    This course develops the expressive powers of the student through practice in the oral interpretation of literature including prose, poetry, and drama. Students analyze a piece of literature, determine the author’s meaning and communicate that meaning to an audience through the appropriate use of body and voice. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    SPC 213 Language of Leaders

    3 Credit(s) DI OC
    This course provides an analysis of the essence of leadership, leadership styles and a leader’s dynamic vision and motivation are explored through the speeches and actions of influential leaders who represent a variety of social and political movements.  Speeches are analyzed in terms of the speaker, the message, the effect, and the social environment in which the speeches were presented. This course satisfies the oral communication core requirement. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    SPC 215 Intercultural Communication

    3 Credit(s) DI V OC
    This course examines sociological and psychological perspectives in intercultural communication. Students explore issues of power, gender, religion, ethnocentrism, and racism. Practical guidelines for communicating across diverse racial, ethnic, socioeconomic, regional, and national cultures are studied. Field research includes artwork, artifacts, and films from different cultures. This course satisfies the oral communication core requirement. Three lecture hours per week.
 

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