Oct 19, 2021  
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

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Computer Science

  
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    CSC 110 Software Design and Programming I

    4 Credit(s) DII


    This course introduces a set of fundamental design principles and problem-solving techniques for the development of computer algorithms and their implementation as programs. Problem solutions are developed with the help of an appropriate modeling language and then coded in an object-oriented programming language. (Consult the Computer Science Department for the languages and tools currently in use.) Topics such as problem specification, object-oriented analysis and design, standard data types, control structures, methods and parameter passing, and design for reuse are presented through a study of specific example problems and solutions. Style, documentation, solution  robustness, and conformance with specifications are emphasized throughout. Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week, plus extensive programming work outside of class. Not open to students who have received credit for CSC201J.
    Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the Basic Mathematics Competency Based Skills requirement and the ability to use standard computer software (e.g., operating system features, word processing, email, and web browsers).

     

  
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    CSC 115 Software Design and Programming II

    4 Credit(s)
    This course extends the treatment of object-oriented methodologies, languages and tools begun in CSC110 . The emphasis is placed on the analysis of complex problems, particularly those involving multiple design alternatives, and the use of class libraries. Fundamental strategies for algorithm design are presented and discussed. Specific topics include inheritance, polymorphism, recursion, stream and file I/O exceptions, and graphical interface programming. Style, documentation, solution robustness, and conformance with specifications are emphasized throughout. Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week, plus extensive programming work outside of class. Not open to students who have received credit for CSC202J.
    Prerequisite: CSC110  or CSC201J.
  
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    CSC 212 Human-Computer Interfaces

    4 Credit(s)
    This course presents the fundamentals of computer/user interfaces using windows frameworks and object-oriented programming concepts. The basic concepts of a user interface, including command-based, graphical, and multimedia interfaces, are covered in a manner independent of specific technologies. A modern window-based interface implementation is then introduced through the use of one or more current object-oriented programming languages and object interface libraries. (Consult the instructor for the language(s) and libraries to be used.) Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week, plus programming work outside of class. Not open to student who have received credit for CSC 312A. Prerequisite: CSC 115  or CSC 202J.
  
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    CSC 223 Microcomputing Systems

    4 Credit(s)
    The technology and functions of the microprocessor chip are discussed. Several different architectures are compared. Control functions, real-time techniques, interrupt processing, multiprocessing, and input/output operations are discussed from the microprocessor point of view. The role of high-level programming languages in microcomputer systems is treated. One or more specific microcomputer instruction sets will be used for programming assignments. Three lecture hours and two hours of scheduled laboratory per week. Not open to student who have received credit for CSC 330A. Prerequisites: CSC105 , and CSC110  or CSC201J, and PHS205 .
  
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    CSC 230 Real-time Computer Interfaces

    3 Credit(s)
    This course deals with the technical aspects of using a computer to sense data from a real world environment and subsequently to control conditions in that environment. The techniques of bread-boarding and experimental electronic circuit construction will be used in the laboratory. The construction and interfacing of robotic devices which sense and react to real-world conditions will be emphasized. Three lecture hours per week plus laboratory work outside of class. Prerequisites: CSC 110  or CSC 202J, and PHS 205 .
  
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    CSC 235 Computer Security Basics

    3 Credit(s)


    This course presents a unified view of information security that examines the closely related areas of software security, system security, and network security using a common set of underlying security principles.  The resulting synthesis of knowledge will enable students to understand the challenges faced by contemporary designers of security information technology infrastructures.  Each of these three security areas is examined in sufficient detail for students to understand the complexity of modern threats and corresponding sophistication of the software and hardware that is designed to counter these threats. Prerequisites: CSC105  or CSC200A, and CSC110  or CSC201J.

     

  
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    CSC 246 Information Visualization

    4 Credit(s) DII Q
    This course presents the basic science and techniques behind information visualization, introducing fundamental concepts concerning the use of color, image processing, computer graphics, and scientific visualization. The course describes the principles of visual perception, information data types, and visual encoding of data representations, and then focuses on the study, design, and development of visualization techniques for the analysis, comprehension, explanation, exploration, and manipulation of large collections of datasets. The latest visual representation methodologies and state-of-the-art visualization tools including programming language(s) and visualization libraries and toolkits will be applied in the course to help understand the subject and to design and generate visual interpretation of large amounts of complex data collected from diverse areas such as physics, chemistry, biomedical studies, meteorology, geospatial research, business, etc. Students will form teams to participate in group projects that emphasize interdisciplinary interaction and cooperation, in order to analyze and solve real world quantitative problems. Four lecture hours per week, plus additional project time outside of class.
    Prerequisites: One Mathematics course chosen from MAT 108 , MAT 110 , MAT 120 , and MAT 208  and above; plus CSC 110  or CSC 201J , or equivalent programming experience and permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    CSC 260 Data Structures and Algorithms

    4 Credit(s)


    Basic data structures such as stacks, queues, linked lists, and trees are studied and applied to problems in data storage and manipulation. Applications include searching and sorting algorithms. Fundamental strategies for algorithm design are presented, analyzed, and evaluated. Design, analysis and implementation techniques are discussed. Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week, plus extensive programming work outside of class.
    Prerequisites: CSC105  or CSC200a, and CSC115  or CSC202J.

     

  
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    CSC 263 Database Systems

    4 Credit(s)
    This course is an in-depth study of the underlying principles of database systems. Topics include data modeling and reduction, physical representations of data and access paths, and the semantics and theory of several major approaches to data base organization, including relational and object-relational. Extensive discussion of query generation and optimization is included for at least one database system. Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week, plus programming work outside of class. Prerequisite: CSC 115  or CSC 202J.
  
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    CSC 278 Scripting Techniques

    4 Credit(s)
    This course presents rapid application development (RAD) techniques and their implementation using modern scripting languages. Methods for defining problems and their solutions will be examined, including task analysis and the development of design criteria. The course investigates the design of modern scripting languages, emphasizing the use of their particular attributes for developing solutions to complex problems. Fundamental programming language paradigms, type systems, and memory allocation and management strategies are presented and discussed, followed by comparative analysis of the languages utilized in this course and its prerequisite. Three hours of lecture and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week, plus programming work outside of class. Prerequisite: CSC115  or CSC202J.
  
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    CSC 279 C+C++

    4 Credit(s)
    This course presents the particular goals, features, and strengths and limitations of C and C++ programming languages. C’s capabilities and limitations as a procedural programming language are examined, followed by an exploration of C++ as an object-oriented language that provides access to C’s feature set. Topics include language grammar rules and their effect on programming style, operators, pointer and reference types, bit manipulation, memory management, and the utilization of the STL (Standard Template Library). Programming assignments will highlight the use of each language in appropriate contexts (e.g. C: systems programming, text processing: C++: program-solving strategies emphasizing OO and the use of STL). Fundamental programming language paradigms, type systems, and memory allocation and management strategies are presented and discussed, followed by comparative analysis of the languages utilized in this course and its prerequisites. Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week, plus extensive programming work outside of class. Prerequisites: CSC115  or CSC202J.
  
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    CSC 295 Computer Architecture and Organization

    3 Credit(s)
    This course examines the basic principles of computer systems and how these concepts relate to the design of such systems. Both hardware and software concepts and the interdependence between them are dealt with. The determination of basic trade-offs and the related decisions are discussed. Logic level designs, data representations, computer circuits, fundamental computer operations, program creation, I/O programming, processing elements, links and interfaces, memory hierarchy, and memory management are covered. Prerequisites: CSC 105  or CSC 215, and   or CSC 202J, and PHS 205 .
  
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    CSC 300 Software Engineering

    4 Credit(s) W W-II
    This course will explore in detail the software development process for large software systems using modern software engineering principles. Topics include software life cycle models, tools and techniques for software engineering, the software development life cycle, the Unified Process, testing/evaluation techniques, and evaluation metrics, Group design projects will be used to gain understanding of course topics and experience with development tools. Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week, plus programming work outside of class.
    Prerequisites: CSC 260  and completion of a W-I course.
  
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    CSC 315A Computer Networks and Data Communications

    4 Credit(s)
    This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of data communications and computer networks. Modulation techniques, multiplexing, transmission media, error control techniques, message formatting, switching and packet-switching techniques, various communication protocols, and networking and internetworking techniques are discussed. Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week, plus programming work outside of class. Prerequisite:  CSC 260  with grade of C+ or higher.
  
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    CSC 325 Advanced Programming Techniques

    4 Credit(s)
    This course presents state-of-practice software development techniques such as Web-based computing, application data exchange, frameworks for managing and securing robust systems, and developing multi-tier software systems. Topics will be illustrated by applications to such areas as remote objects, communication with remote components, reflection, security and Web Services.  Specific topics will be chosen based on current software industry trends. Fundamental programming language paradigms, type systems, and memory allocation and management strategies are presented and discussed, followed by comparative analysis of the languages utilized in this course and its direct and indirect prerequisites. Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week, plus extensive programming work outside of class. Prerequisite: CSC260 .
  
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    CSC 340 Artificial Intelligence

    3 Credit(s)
    This course studies the theory and application techniques which allow a computer to “behave intelligently”. Various operational definitions of intelligence are discussed, along with the concept of “mechanized intelligence”. The course includes case studies of expert systems which solve engineering design problems, diagnose disease, and learn from their environment via natural language and/or visual interaction with a user. The role of planning, goal formation, search analysis and evaluation, and various forms of representation will be discussed extensively. Three lecture hours per week.
    Prerequisites: CSC 105  or CSC 215, and CSC 260 .
  
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    CSC 351 Software Engineering II

    4 Credit(s)
    This course is an extension of CSC300 and focuses on the implementation of the software principles covered therein. This course explores state-of-practice and cutting-edge techniques and tools related to the design, implementation, and maintenance of software systems. Topics include: design patterns, Model Driven Architecture (MDA), test-driven development, agile development, extreme programming (XP), and aspect-oriented design. An ongoing group project will be used to gain practical experience with current software engineering practices and a variety of IDEs and CASE tools. Three lecture hours per week and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week, plus programming work outside of class. Not open to students who have received credit for CSC 301.
    Prerequisite: CSC 300 ; CSC 263  strongly recommended.
  
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    CSC 367 Internship in Computer Science

    1-6 Credit(s)
    This course provides an opportunity for broadening and augmenting a student’s computer knowledge through placement in an organization or agency engaged in work directly related to a Computer Science student’s academic interests. The number of credits will vary with the nature of the work and the time commitment involved. A student must meet Departmental requirements before registering for the course. Limited to Computer Science majors. Free elective credits only. This course may be repeated for credits, but the total number of CSC 267 and CSC 367 credits may not exceed 6. Prerequisites: CSC 260  and permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    CSC 376 Topics in Computer Science

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is used for the exploration of advanced aspects of computer science. Course content variable. Course may be repeated for credit with permission of the Department Chairperson. Not open to students who have received credit for CSC 430. Prerequisites: CSC 260 ; other prerequisites variable, depending on topic.
  
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    CSC 381 Operating System Principles

    3 Credit(s)
    This course presents the evolution of computer operating systems, operating system functionalities, and current design and implementation techniques. Relationships between the operating system, computer architecture, and the user community are discussed. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to student who have received credit for CSC 280. Prerequisite: CSC 260 .
  
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    CSC 400 Theory of Computation

    3 Credit(s)
    This course introduces the basic concepts underlying the theoretical study of computing and computers; formal languages, automata, Turing machines, computability, and computational complexity. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to student who have received credit for CSC 290. Prerequisites: CSC 260  and MAT 214 or MAT 214A .
  
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    CSC 415 Analysis of Algorithms

    3 Credit(s)
    Advanced concepts from data structures and general algorithms are discussed from both theoretical and applied viewpoints. Topics covered include multi lists, graph theory, searching and sorting algorithms, and general n-way tree structures. Techniques for analysis of algorithms for average and best/worst cases are presented. Laboratory work may involve programming in a high level language. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: CSC 260  and  .
  
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    CSC 425 Computer Graphics and Games

    4 Credit(s)
    This course covers fundamental principles and applications underlying computer graphics and computer games.  The course presents key aspects of computer graphics including graphics pipeline, scene graphics, 2D/3D geometric objects and transformations, viewing, shading, and modeling.  Topics related to computer game development, include game engines, animation, behavior and interaction.  The course will also introduce basic concepts of collision detection, illumination, game design and implementation, and will emphasize the application of the topics in game-related computer graphics programming projects with the use of graphics libraries and game engines and tool kits.  Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory time per week, plus programming work outside of class.
    Prerequisites: MAT108  or MAT110  or any MAT course numbered 208 or above, plus CSC260 .
     
  
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    CSC 435 Computer and Network Security Engineering

    3 Credit(s)


    This course offers a detailed analysis of security problems and the corresponding methods used to create practical, working solutions to problems in computer and network security. Topics include secure software design, architecture of security products, and organization and administration of information security solutions - secure operating systems, secure communication protocols, and secure software. Through laboratory exercises students will develop expertise in the use of contemporary security tools for protecting computers and computer networks. Three lecture hours per week.
    Prerequisites: CSC315A ; CSC279  strongly recommended.

     

     

     

     

  
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    CSC 445 Parallel Processing

    4 Credit(s)


     

    This course deals with the hardware and software aspects of multiprocessor systems (two or more processors in use simultaneously). The reasons for using such systems, including processor speed limitations and non-uniform capabilities of processors or computers, are examined. Basic hardware concepts such as machine models, parallel programs, networks, and performance and scalability are discussed. Relevant compiler and operating system concepts, programming models, and program development methodologies are introduced. Three lecture hours and one scheduled laboratory hour per week, plus additional laboratory work outside of class. Prerequisites: CSC 115  or CSC 202J, and CSC 295 .

  
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    CSC 475 Distributed and Cloud Computing

    4 Credit(s)
    This course introduces the design principles, system architectures and innovative applications of parallel, distributed, and cloud computing systems. It aims to acquaint students with supercomputers, distributed and cloud computing systems for high-performance computing, research, e-commerce, social networking, and web-scale Internet applications. Topics include clustering, virtualization, cloud platform architecture, service-oriented architecture, cloud programming, security in distribution and cloud computing, and the Internet of Things. Software development platforms and tools from several leading distributed and cloud computing vendors are used to gain hands-on experiences. Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week, plus programming work outside of class.
    Pre- or Co-requisite: CSC 381  or CSC 280.
  
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    CSC 485 Robotics and Computer Vision

    4 Credit(s)
    This course presents the basic science behind mobile robotics, robotic manipulation, and computer vision. The course examined key aspects of autonomous systems including sensors, map making, and path planning. The fundamentals of robotic manipulation will be presented, including coordinate transformations, manipulator, kinematics, and motion. Topics in computer vision include image formation, and sensing, region and edge extraction, feature identification, camera calibration and optical measurement. The course concludes with techniques for integrating vision, mobile robots, and manipulators into a complete system. Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory time per week. Prerequisites: CSC260 ; CSC279  strongly recommended.
  
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    CSC 498 Project Specification and Design Practicum

    1 Credit(s)
    The practicum sets up a typical environment for the development of a detailed proposal for a software- or hardware-system project. The instructor will assist each student in choosing an appropriate project topic and in refining the proposal through all stages from initial outline to final formal specification. The completed proposal will serve as the contract for the CSC500  Directed Study project. The course involves periodic meetings, group discussions, and individual conferences. The practicum is graded on a Pass/Fail basis and is taught on a Directed Study basis. Open only to Computer Science majors. 
    Prerequisites: CSC300  and permission of department chairperson.
  
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    CSC 500 Directed Study in Computer Science I

    3 Credit(s)
    A substantial project involving system design and implementation is carried out on an individual or group basis under the supervision of a faculty member. The specification for the project must have been completed in the prerequisite course CSC498. Open only to Computer Science majors.
     Prerequisites:
    CSC 498 . Other prerequisites will vary with the project, and are at the discretion of the Faculty supervisor for that project.
  
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    CSC 501 Directed Study in Computer Science II

    3 Credit(s)
    General guidelines and timetables are the same as for CSC500, except that a CSC501 project may (but need not necessarily) be more oriented towards academic or theoretical study. Papers, tests, and oral examinations by the Directed Study Committee (or a designee) may take the place of some or all program design and coding requirements, if appropriate. Prerequisites: CSC 498 . Additional prerequisites, which vary with the project, are at the discretion of the faculty supervisor for the project.
  
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    CSC 520 Computer Science Capstone Project Specifications

    1 Credit(s)
    This course sets up a typical environment for the development of a detailed proposal for a software- or hardware-system project. The instructor will assist each student in choosing an appropriate project topic and in refining the project proposal through all stages from initial outline to final formal specification and presentation. The completed proposal will serve as the contract for the CSC521 Computer Science Capstone Project. The course involves periodic meetings, group discussions (if appropriate), and individual conferences. A presentation of the completed proposal will be made to the Computer Science Department faculty and students. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis and is taught on a Directed Study basis. Open only to Computer Science majors. Prerequisites: CSC 260  and CSC 300  and permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    CSC 521 Computer Science Capstone Project

    3 Credit(s) w-III


    A substantial project involving system design and implementation is carried out on an individual or group basis under the supervision of a faculty member. The specification for the project must have been completed in the prerequisite course CSC 520. A presentation of the completed project will be made to Computer Science faculty and students; writing experiences will be used to develop skills in analysis and rhetoric. The course involves periodic meetings, group discussions (if appropriate), and individual conferences. Open only to Computer Science majors.

    Prerequisites: CSC 520  and permission of Department Chairperson.

  
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    ITC 183 Cyber-Security: A Personal & Professional Responsibility

    3 Credit(s) PGR
    How safe are you in the digital world? Hackers are trying to gain access to your private information, identity theft allows criminals to impersonate you while conducting criminal activity, viruses are trying to destroy your computer. Do you know the good practices you must follow to make your Internet experience safe? If not - this course is for you. It provides an overview of information security - the main issue, facing the Internet community today. Computers worldwide are under attack by hackers, threatening our financial well being, hurting the companies we work for, and even endangering the whole infrastructure of our society. This course presents a user level view of computer  and network security and includes discussion of topics you must know o be responsible (personally and professionally) members of our social environment as individuals and work force participants.
  
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    ITE 101 Survey of Computing

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides an overview of fundamental areas within the Computing Discipline, introducing basic vocabulary, central concepts, and typical applications. The areas surveyed include computer hardware, computer arithmetic, operating systems, programming constructs, programming languages, information storage and retrieval, databases, networking, and the social context of computing. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    ITE 105 Problem Solving with Algorithms

    3 Credit(s)
    This course serves as an introduction to programming. Using flow charts, pseudo-languages, and software development strategies, students will learn techniques for identifying and selecting solutions to problems by designing algorithms, using stepwise refinement and structured programming techniques. Students will design algorithms using pseudo-code, implement algorithms using a simplified programming environment, and participate in hand-on debugging, testing and documenting activities. Topics include principles of programming, the logic of constructing a computer program, integrating modules into a cohesive application, and fundamentals of programming languages. In-class exercises allow students to practice these techniques while solving assigned problems. Three lecture hours per week. Recommended for students with no prior programming experience. Prerequisisites: High school algebra I & II plus experience with a window-based operating system and the use of email and a word processor.
  
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    ITE 201 Fundamentals of Information Technology

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is intended to provide students with an understanding of the discipline of Information Technology (IT), itds relationship to other computing disciplines, and a set of fundamental skills necessary to IT specialists. The discussions include pervasive themes in IT, history of IT, IT and its related and informing disciplines, and IT application domains. It is also intended to help students understand the diverse contexts in which IT is used and the effect of IT on society as a whole. This course provides students with the fundamental terminology, concepts, abstraction patterns, and tools used by IT. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: ITE 101 .
  
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    ITE 205 Software Design and Programming I

    3 Credit(s)
    This course introduces a set of fundamental design principles and problem-solving techniques for the development of computer algorithms and their implementation as programs. Problem solutions are developed with the help of an appropriate modeling language and then coded in an object-oriented programming language. (Consult the Computer Science Department for the languages and tools currently in use.) Topics such as problem specification, object-oriented analysis and design, standard data types, control structures, methods and parameter passing, and design for reuse are presented through a study of specific example problems and solutions. Style, documentation, solution robustness, and conformance with specifications are emphasized throughout. Three lecture hours and three hours of scheduled laboratory per week plus extensive programming work outside of class. Prerequisite: ITE 105 .

Dance

  
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    DAN 091 Dance Participation

    0 Credit(s)
    This course records the student’s direct supervised involvement in attendance of dance performances, master classes and workshops, and the student’s participation in Departmental dance productions. A Pass/Fail grade is based on completion of assigned activities for Departmental productions. Required for every semester that the student is enrolled as a dance major, this course may be repeated for a maximum total of eight times. Does not give degree credits and has no impact on GPA.
  
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    DAN 100 Introduction to Dance

    3 Credit(s) DI V CEA WC
    Through lecture and discussion, this course provides a broad-based introduction to the cultural context, historical importance, and aesthetic ideologies of various dance forms existing in our multicultural world.  An examination of dance as a catalyst for social awareness and change will be explored through choreographic works dealing with but not limited to feminism, racism, and oppression.  Relevant movement and performance experiences serve to illuminate class discussions.  Attendance required at dance concerts.  Three lecture hours per week. Fulfills the CEA or WC general core categories. Not open to students who received credit for SMS 178.
  
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    DAN 101 Exploring Dance for the Beginner

    3 Credit(s) PGR CEA
    This course is designed for the student with no previous dance experience. The course will introduce the novice student to basic dance technique while examining the creative process of dance making, and exposing the student to performance skills both through viewing and executing dances. Students will engage in movement classes with an emphasis on physical, social, and emotional wellness, view dance works through a cultural lens, and create choreographic compositions in response to ethical issues. This course fulfills the Creative Expression and Appreciation or Personal Growth and Responsibility general core category.
  
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    DAN 102 Beginner Dance

    1 Credit(s) CEA
    This course is an introduction to the basic principles of a select dance technique for students with no previous dance training. The selection of the dance form will be determined by the department each semester. The course will examine the selected topic through the execution of the movement practice, studying the historical context, viewing dances, and participating in the creative process. Proper dance attire must be worn. Repeatable multiple times for credit. Three hours per week. Students taking the course a total of three times fulfill the Creative Expression and Appreciation general education category.
  
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    DAN 103 Street Latin Dance

    1 Credit(s)
    The course is an introduction to Street Latin Dances such as the salsa, merengue, bachata, chachacha, reggaeton and rumba.  Fundamentals of footwork, patterns, turns and partnering along with contramovement of the hips, shoulders and torso will contribute to the development of strength coordination and stamina.  Appropriate dance attire must be worn.  Three hours per week.  Not open to students who have received credit for SMS 149.
  
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    DAN 109 Special Topics in Dance

    1 Credit(s)
    This course will examine dances in relation to aesthetic principles and cultural context of a selected dance form. The selection of the dance form will be determined by the department each semester. Appropriate dance attire must be worn. May be taken for credit up to four times. Three hours per week. Not open to students who received 4 credits for SMS 159.
  
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    DAN 110 Ballet I

    1 Credit(s)
    This level-one ballet technique class is designed for the student with previous dance experience.  Emphasis will be on correct body alignment, form and musicality. Appropriate dance attire must be worn. This course is repeatable two times for a total of 3 credits. Not open to students who received 3 credits of SMS154. Three hours per week.
  
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    DAN 111 Ballet II

    1 Credit(s)
    This is an intermediate level ballet technique class. Emphasis will be on correct body alignment, form and musicality. Appropriate dance attire must be worn. Three hours per week. This course is repeatable two times for a total of 3 credits. Prerequisites: SMS154, DAN 110  or permission of instructor is required.
  
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    DAN 112 Ballet III

    1 Credit(s)
    This is an advanced level ballet technique class. Emphasis will be on correct body alignment, form and musicality. Appropriate dance attire must be worn. Three hours per week. This course is repeatable two times for a total of 3 credits. Not open to students who received 3 credits for SMS 156.
    Prerequisites: SMS154, SMS155, DAN 110 , DAN 111  or permission of instructor is required.
  
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    DAN 120 Modern Dance I

    1 Credit(s)
    This level I modern dance technique class is designed for the student with previous dance experience.  Structured exercises and combinations will focus on space, time, energy and movement dynamics.  Appropriate dance attire must be worn. Three hours per week. This course is repeatable three times for a total of 4 credits. Student may receive a maximum of four credits between SMS 150 and DAN 120.
  
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    DAN 121 Modern Dance II

    1 Credit(s)
    This course is an intermediate level modern dance technique class. Structured exercises and combinations will focus on space, time, energy, and movement dynamics.  Appropriate dance attire must be worn. Three hours per week. This course is repeatable three times for a total of 4 credits. Students may receive a maximum of four credits between SMS 151 and DAN 121. Prerequisites: SMS 150, DAN 120  or permission of instructor is required.
  
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    DAN 122 Modern Dance III

    1 Credit(s)
    This is an advanced level modern dance technique class. Structured exercises and combinations will focus on space, time, energy, and movement dynamics.  Appropriate dance attire must be worn.  This course is repeatable three times for a total of 4 credits. Students may receive a maximum of four credits between SMS 152 and DAN 122. Three hours per week.
    Prerequisites: SMS150, SMS152, DAN 120 , DAN 121  or permission of instructor.
  
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    DAN 126 Dance Improvisation

    1 Credit(s)
    This course will explore the act of creating movement spontaneously. Through guided direction by the instructor, students will develop skills that create awareness about how the body relates to space, time and energy. These skills are designed to enhance students’ creativity. This course is designed for students without dance training and students of various levels of experience. Three hours per week. Not open to students who received credit for SMS157.
  
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    DAN 130 Hip Hop I

    1 Credit(s)
    This level I hip hop dance technique class is designed for the student with previous dance experience. Structured exercises and combinations will focus on space, time, and energy. Appropriate dance attire must be worn. This course is repeatable three times for a total of 4 credits. Three hours per week.
  
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    DAN 131 Hip Hop II

    1 Credit(s)
    This intermediate level hip hop dance technique class is designed for the student with previous dance experience. Structured exercises and combinations will focus on space, time, and energy. Appropriate dance attire must be worn. This course is repeatable three times for a total of 4 credits. Three hours per week. Prerequisite: DAN 130  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    DAN 132 Hip Hop III

    1 Credit(s)
    This advanced level hip hop dance technique class is designed for the student with previous dance experience. Structured exercises and combinations will focus on space, time, and energy. Appropriate dance attire must be worn. This course is repeatable three times for a total of 4 credits. Three hours per week. Prerequisites: DAN 130 , DAN 131 , or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    DAN 136 Cyphering Dance

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will explore the act of creating urban movement spontaneously. Through guided direction by the instructor, students will develop skills that create awareness about how the body relates to space, time, and energy. These skills are designed to enhance students’ creativity within the cypher, an area of the dance floor that is open to those who wish to dance in it. This course is designed for students with previous dance training. Appropriate dance attire must be worn. Three hours per week.
  
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    DAN 150 Dance Ensemble I

    3 Credit(s) CEA
    This course is for students with dance experience who are interested in exploring dance as a performing art.  Students will learn choreography that will culminate in a performance at the end of the semester.  Throughout the course students will work in collaboration with each other and the instructor to create a dance piece that will be performed at the end of the semester.  Students are required to attend and participate in crew production hours for various dance presentations on campus.  Required for Dance Concentration and Dance Minors. Three lecture hours per week. Fulfills the Creative Expression and Appreciation general core category. Not open to students who received credit for SMS 179.
  
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    DAN 151 Dance Composition I

    3 Credit(s) CEA
    This course will provide a structured environment for students to explore and experiment with the creative process in dance making and to find personal expression in their own choreography.  Students will learn about and apply various compositional tools and choreographic approaches to expand their movement language and choreographic ideas.  Discussion and feedback on choreographic assignments will develop critical response skills and deepen students’ understanding of the creative process. Readings, video screenings and live performances will provide students with a critical understanding of dance and place their own dance making in a cultural and historical context. Three lecture hours per week. Fulfills Creative Expression and Appreciation general core category. Not open to students who received credit for SMS 240.
  
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    DAN 200 Dance Ensemble II

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is for students with previous dance experience who are interested in exploring dance as a performing art. Students will collaborate to create material that will be integrated into a piece of choreography. Students will learn choreography taught by instructor that will culminate in a performance at the end of the semester. Appropriate dance attire must be worn. Three lecture hours per week. Repeatable one time. Not open to students who received credit for SMS 442.  Prerequisite: SMS 179 or DAN 150 .
  
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    DAN 201 Dance Composition II

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed for students who wish to further develop their abilities as a choreographer. Building on previous experience and study, students will continue to develop a movement language to articulate physical expression, and to explore how structure organizes choreographic ideas. Material developed in this class will build towards a finished work. Three lecture hours per week. Repeatable one time. Not open to students who received credit for SMS 443. Prerequisite: SMS 240 or DAN 151 .
  
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    DAN 210 The Dancing Body

    3 Credit(s)
    This course will provide a study of the skeletal and muscular systems of the human body from an experiental and somatic approach as it applies to the dancing body.  Emphasis will be placed on human movement analysis in relation to dance practices.  Appropriate dance attire must be worn. Not open to students who have taken SMS 241. Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    DAN 300 Dance Entrepreneurship

    3 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to provide an overview of how to navigate a sustainable lifestyle in the dance field as an artist, teacher, studio owner, and/or arts administrator. Topics include potential careers, portfolio and resume writing, auditioning, marketing, grant writing and development, company management, and community outreach. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to students who received credit for SMS 340.
  
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    DAN 310 Dance: Context and Cultures

    4 Credit(s)
    This course prepares the student to think critically about dance.  Through the study of dance theory, choreographic styles, and published critical writing, the course examines the impact of dance forms on our cultures and the important role dance plays in society. Four lecture hours per week.  Not open to students who have received credit for SMS 440.
  
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    DAN 400 Teaching Dance

    4 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to provide students with the theories, standards and skills to teach various dance forms in studios and public and private schools. Students will investigate personal beliefs about teaching and learning as well as essential skills needed to become a dance teacher. Topics will include the learning environment, methodology, lesson planning, and assessment. Four lecture hours per week. Not open to students who received credit for SMS 441.
  
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    DAN 410 Senior Capstone in Dance

    3 Credit(s) W W-III


    This writing-intensive course provides students with an opportunity to reflect broadly upon their education at Salem State University and the dance field. This course emphasizes the connection between theory, research, and practice, as well as how dance connects to the larger society. Final projects include a written paper and a presentation of research and creative work. Three lecture hours per week. Required of and open to junior or senior Dance Majors or permission by Department Chair. Fulfills Written Communication - Level III category.

     

     

  
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    DAN 415 Advanced Topics in Dance

    3 Credit(s)
    This course offers an in-depth study on rotating topics related to the field of dance. Topics and course content are determined by the instructor of each course offering. This course is repeatable once for a total of six credits on different topics.  Prerequisite: DAN 150 .
  
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    DAN 500 Directed Study in Dance

    1-3 Credit(s)


    This is an independant study in an area of special interest in Dance.  Prior to registration, a proposal mut be submitted and approved by the instructor nad the Department Chairperson.  DAN 500 can be taken for 1,2, or 3 credits and is repeateable up to a total of 6 credits of Directed Study.

    Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chairperson.

  
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    FYDA 100 First Year Seminar (DANCE)

    3 Credit(s) FYS
    This course will introduce students to the experience of academic exploration that is at the heart of a liberal arts education.  Through study of one or more compelling questions or topics in a small seminar setting, students will practice creative and critical thinking and will learn to express themselves effectively and appropriately in a college setting. They will develop relationships and practices that allow them to effectively utilize college resources and become members of a community of learners.  The specific topic of the seminar will be developed by individual faculty and will be announced in advance.  First year seminars are required for first-year students and transfer students with fewer than 15 credits.  Not open to students who have received credit for IDS 189  or another first year seminar course.

Economics

  
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    ECO 200 Principles and Problems of Economics

    3 Credit(s) DIII Q QR
    This course is an introduction to the basic economic concepts in micro and macroeconomics. Topics analyzed include: scarcity, supply and demand, costs of production, the price mechanism, market structures, national income, money and banking, the public sector, distribution of income and an introduction to alternative economic systems. The influence of political, social, legal, environmental, global, and technological issues are discussed in the process of presenting applications of economic theories. Discussions, basic quantitative and written analysis and evidence based research are encouraged. Three lecture hours per week. Not open to Economics majors or Business Administration majors. Elective for all other majors. Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the Basic Math Competency requirement.
  
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    ECO 201 Principles of Macroeconomics

    3 Credit(s) DIII Q QR CS
    This course employs economic theory and models to study aggregate measures of the economy such as GDP, National income accounting, the role of consumption, savings, investment and government spending, the open economy (exports and imports), that is, our economy’s interactions with the global economy, the functions of money and credits, the banking system and fiscal and monetary policy will be examined from a descriptive and analytical point of view. The economic objectives of growth, price, stability and full employment are reviewed and evaluated in the light of current issues. The influences of political, social, legal, environmental, global, and technological issues are discussed in the process of presenting applications of macroeconomic theories. Discussions, quantitative and written analysis and evidence based research are encouraged. Three lecture hours per week. Required of all Economics majors and Business Administration majors. Elective for all other majors. Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the Basic Math Competency requirement.
  
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    ECO 202 Principles of Microeconomics

    3 Credit(s) DIII Q QR CS
    This course encompasses the economics of the firm, price theory, analysis of demand, supply, elasticity, market structures, income distribution, international trade, foreign exchange, and current issues in microeconomics. The influences of political, social, legal, environmental, global, and technological issues are discussed in the process of presenting applications of microeconomic theories and models. Discussions, quantitative and written analysis and evidence based research are encouraged. Three lecture hours per week. Required of all Economics majors and Business Administration majors. Quantitative Reasoning (QR) elective for all other majors. Prerequisite: Satisfaction of the Basic Math Competency requirement.
  
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    ECO 208N Economics of Personal Financial Decisions

    3 Credit(s) DIII Q
    An examination of the role of the consumer in the United States Economy. Stress is upon the conventional concepts of consumer behavior as well as the contemporary institutional forces which affect the consumer in the market place such as consumer law, governmental regulation and deregulation, the “consumerism” movement, and the state of formal consumer education. Emphasis will also be placed upon the economics of credits, insurance, real estate, investing in the financial market, personal buying decisions, and other household buying decisions. Three lecture hours per week. Elective for Economics majors and minors. Division III elective for all other majors. Not open to students who have received credits for ECO208. This course is offered on a periodic basis. Prerequisite: ECO 200  or ECO 202  or ECO 201 .
  
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    ECO 215 Political Economy I

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course deals with the combined economic-political process as related to society’s desire to efficiently allocate scarce resources among competing socially desired goals. Course material will explore the various political economic theories relative to competition, command (power), and change. The merits of these theories will be critically evaluated relative to efficiency, fairness and democracy. The course will focus attention on the economic realities of present day society as it debates the pros and cons of a free market system (capitalism). Three lecture hours per week. No previous study of economics is presumed. Elective for Economics majors and minors. Division III elective for all other majors. Not open to students who have taken ECO101. This course is offered on a periodic basis.
  
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    ECO 300 Economics of Labor and Income Distribution

    3 Credit(s) DIII Q
    Analysis of labor markets and how they function, the functional and personal distribution of income, poverty and low-wage employment and a comparison of theories of labor supply wages and employment with labor market behavior. Discussion of public policy issues; structural unemployment, impact of technical change, and cost-push inflation. Three lecture hours per week. This course is offered on a periodic basis. Elective for Economics majors and minors. Division III elective for all other majors. Prerequisite: ECO 202 .
  
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    ECO 301 Intermediate Macroeconomics

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Analysis of the status and performance of the U.S. economy. A discussion of the issues that affect the open economy, such as unemployment, inflation and growth, and policies (monetary, fiscal, international and structural) that the government may employ to affect the performance of the open economy both domestically and in its interactions with the global economy. Analysis of various aggregate demand and supply models. Comparison of Classical, Keynesian, Neo-Keynesian macroeconomics models. Emphasis is on static and comparative static analysis of employment, production, and the general price level. The influence of political, social, legal, environmental, global, and technological issues are discussed in the process of presenting applications of macroeconomic theories. Oral discussion, quantitative analysis, reading a current financial newspaper, computer usage and Internet research are encouraged. Three lecture hours per week. Required of all Economics majors-Junior year. Elective for Economics minors. Division III elective for all other majors. Prerequisite: ECO 201 .
  
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    ECO 302 Intermediate Microeconomics

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Applied economic analysis of the market decisions of the consumer, firms and labor. Using optimization techniques, the decisions of the participants in various market structures are evaluated both in theory and in case studies. Topics include optimization decisions under conditions of uncertainty, less than perfect competition, and in the presence of externalities. The influence of political, social, legal, environmental, global, and technological issues are discussed in the process of presenting applications of microeconomic theories. Oral discussion, quantitative analysis, Internet research and computer usage are encouraged. three lecture hours per week. Required of all Economics Majors-Junior year. Elective for Economics Minors. Division III elective for all other Majors.
  
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    ECO 304N Statistics for the Social Scientist

    3 Credit(s) DIII Q
    This course is a computer-oriented examination of advanced quantitative techniques as applied to decision making in economics, business and the social sciences. It includes data description, probability, confidence intervals, analysis of variance, chi square analysis, regression and correlation analysis, time series and index number construction. It stresses the development of statistical thinking, the assessment of credibility and value of inferences made from data, by both those who consume and those who produce the information. Statistical inference and data collection and analysis will be used to evaluate statistical studies. Case studies and exercises will draw on real business situations and recent economic events. Not open to students who have taken ECO304. Prerequisite: MAT 108 .
  
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    ECO 305A Money, Banking and Financial Markets

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    A detailed description of the financial markets, instruments and institutions of the U.S. economy. Discussion of the Federal Reserve system and monetary policy formation and implementation. Essentials of the classical theory of money and modern theories of money and income. Emphasis on domestic and international debt and equity markets and foreign exchange. Three lecture hours per week. This course is offered on a periodic basis. Elective for Economics majors and minors. Not open to students who have taken ECO305. Prerequisites: ECO 201 , ECO 202 .
  
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    ECO 306 Comparative Economic Systems

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    An analytical comparison of the ways in which nations organize economic activity. Different systems will be scrutinized with respect to the role of monetary and financial institutions, the organization of industry, agriculture and trade. Three lecture hours per week. This course is offered on a periodic basis. Elective for Economics majors. Division III elective for all other majors. Prerequisites: ECO 201 , ECO 202 .
  
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    ECO 307 Economic History

    3 Credit(s) DIII HP
    Variations in aspects of American and European History with emphasis upon the role of technological change as related to economic growth will be analyzed and evaluated. A variety of historical materials will be used to suggest desirable alterations in certain economic models. Three lecture hours per week. This course is offered on a periodic basis. Elective for Economics majors. Division III elective for all other majors.
  
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    ECO 309 Urban Economics

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    A study of both economic theory and the economic institutions characteristic of urban areas. Problems of urban economics, such as poverty, discrimination, housing, pollution, education, transportation and crime are examined in depth. Three lecture hours per week. This course is offered on a periodic basis. Elective for Economics majors. Distribution III elective for all other majors. Prerequisite: ECO 200  or ECO 201 , ECO 202 .
  
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    ECO 312 International Trade

    3 Credit(s) DIII Q
    An examination of the basis for trade among nations and the implications of trade restricting policies on a nation’s welfare. The open economy and the implications for fiscal and monetary policies in achieving various economic goals. An introduction to international finance and various exchange and payment mechanisms. Three lecture hours per week. This course is offered on a periodic basis. Elective for Economics majors and minors. Division III elective for all other majors. Prerequisites: ECO 201 , ECO 202  or permission of the Department Chairperson.
  
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    ECO 313 Economic Development

    3 Credit(s) DIII V
    This course applies economic development concepts and theories to present world economic development issues and problems. Topics covered include the causes and distributional effects of economic growth; migration and urban unemployment; oppression, the welfare effects of technical change; the role of agrarian institutions in the development process; the impact of alternative development policies and strategies on various populations; and poverty and famine in developing countries. This course will increase awareness of growth issues in the context of a multicultural world. Three lecture hours per week. This course is offered on a periodic basis. Elective for Economics majors. Prerequisite: ECO 201  or ECO 202  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    ECO 317 Government Finance

    3 Credit(s) DIII Q
    The micro and macro economic roles and responsibilities of government are reviewed and analyzed. Topics discussed are fiscal policy, income distribution, principles of taxation, the taxpayers’ revolt, state and local government finance, revenue sharing, and the fiscal crisis of cities. Current issues are used for analytical purposes. Three lecture hours per week. This course is offered on a periodic basis. Elective for Economics majors. Division III elective for all other majors. Prerequisite: ECO 200  or ECO 201 .
  
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    ECO 318 Health Economics

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    The organization of health care, the problems associated with various alternate delivery systems, the utilization and availability of physicians and other paramedical personnel, the growth and pressures exerted by third-party payers, and consideration of federal, state, and municipal participation in the delivery of quality medical care under the various alternatives for national health care. Three lecture hours per week. The course is offered on a periodic basis. Elective for Economics majors. Division III elective for all other majors. Prerequisite: ECO 200  or ECO 201 .
  
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    ECO 319 Environmental and Natural Resource Economics

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    This course will study environmental and natural resource economics. Resource allocation, government regulation, the presence of externalities, economic growth and poverty will be analyzed in terms of their impact on depletion, conversation and restoration of our natural resources. Three lecture hours per week. This course is offered on a periodic basis. Division III elective for all other majors. Prerequisite: ECO 202 .
  
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    ECO 320 Economics of Sports

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    Using examples and applications from the sports industry, this course applies a wide range of economic principles to the study of sports. Industrial organization, public finance, and labor economics represent some of the areas of economics used to analyze the economic impact of the sports industry. Theories related to the issue of profit vs. not for profit companies will be explored. Three lecture hours per week. This course is offered on a periodic basis. Elective for Economics majors. Prerequisite: ECO 200  or ECO 202 .
  
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    ECO 321 Behavioral Economics

    3-6 Credit(s) DIII
     

    Standard economic theories represent people in ways that are often different from how they actually behave.  This course studies the limits of the traditional economic assumption of rational decision making.  It will use evidence from psychology and consider social, cognitive and emotional factors that influence the decision of individuals and institutions, including consumers, borrowers and investors.  Incorporating these factors can make economic theory and predictions more accurate.  In addition, the course will analyze the impact of behavioral economic concepts on markets, investments, and resources allocation.  Three lecture hours per week.

  
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    ECO 350 Probability and Game Theory

    3 Credit(s) DIII Q
    Probability is the study of uncertainty using mathematics. Game theory is the use of mathematical models to analyze strategic choice. This course attempts to merge the two in a comprehensive integration of the two fields. Basic topics that will be covered include extensive and normal form games, the Nash equilibrium, dominant and mixed strategies and probability. Advanced topics will include utility and risk, brinkmanship, auctions, elementary calculus, and the theory of moves. Games will be analyzed with and without complete information, in both a static and dynamic context. This course is highly influenced by the field of economics and will include many economic examples of game theory in practice. Other examples will draw from psychology, sociology, history and politics. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: MAT 108  and either ECO 201  or ECO 202 .
  
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    ECO 360 Economics and Religion

    3 Credit(s) DIII V CS
    The interplay between religion and economics has always been important, and the events of the past several years have only served to strengthen the need to understand these links. This course employs economic theory and methods to study religious beliefs, behavior, and institutions. By combining economic concepts and real-world data, we will address the issues and questions listed in the outline of topics. We will also study the social, political, and economic correlates of religion. Like other socio-scientific approaches to the study of religion, the economic study of religion does not seek to evaluate the truth of religious claims, nor does it promote one religion over another. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: ECO 202  or permission of Department Chairperson.
  
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    ECO 400 Econometrics

    3 Credit(s) DIII Q
    This is an Econometrics seminar on single variable regression, multiple regression, functional form analysis and alternative specifications to assess whether findings are robust. Emphasis will be placed on empirical real world examples to foster the understanding of how regression analysis can provide credible estimates of causal effects. Additional topics include: omitted variable bias, sampling variability, econometric inference (estimation, testing, confidence intervals), specification errors, residual diagnostics and time series analysis. Empirical analysis is done using SPSS or a similar statistical package. Major requirement for BS degree in Economics. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: ECO 301 , ECO 302  and ECO 304N  or ODS 262  or MAT 147 .
  
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    ECO 401 Economic Research

    3 Credit(s) DIII W W-III
    Economic research methods, problem solving techniques, formulation of the problem, selection and use of methods for gathering evidence, analysis and interpretation of data, and reporting will be covered. Students demonstrate their understanding and mastery of the economic research methods studied in this course by discussing, researching and writing about a relevant economic problem. Statistical inference and econometrics are employed to formulate and research a hypotheses. A poster presentation of the final research to a faculty forum is required. Three lecture hours per week.
    Prerequisites: ECO 304N  or ODS 262  or MAT 147  and either   or ECO 302 .
  
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    ECO 403 Economics Study Travel Seminar

    3 Credit(s)


     

     

    A study/travel course that focuses on selected economic issues related to a country or region, followed by travel and field study in the area concerned.  Topic varies.  May be repeated for credit with permission of Department Chair.  Three lecture hours per week.  Prerequisites: Permission from Department Chair.

  
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    ECO 485 Internship in Economics

    3 Credit(s)
    This course provides an opportunity for experiential learning in the field of Economics. The student will present a proposal, secure an advisor to supervise the experience, keep a detailed weekly journal of the work experience and write a research paper on a topic which has been approved by the advisor. 120 hours of work experience. Prerequisites: ECO 201  and ECO 202 .
  
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    ECO 501 Directed Readings in Economics

    3 Credit(s) DIII
    The purpose of this course is to provide students an opportunity to accelerate the reading and/or research in their fields or interest. Emphasis is placed on independent scholarship and individualized direction. May be taken in lieu of ECO 401  or ECO 400  with approval of the Department Chairperson. Prerequisites: ECO 301 , ECO 302 .

Education

  
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    EDC 115 Exploring Education

    3 Credit(s) CS
    Through active engagement in school and non-school settings linked to course readings, students will explore contemporary issues in education and reflect on their own experience as learners. Using film, observations, experiential activities and readings we will look at education in the U.S. through multiple lenses–historical, philosophical, sociological, political, and personal. We will ask questions about the purpose of schools in a democracy, what it means to “learn” something, and what makes an “educated” person. We will explore problems of educational access and equity and consider the climates and conditions that support or limit learning and the work of educators. Three lecture hours per week. 15 hours of field work required.  Not open to students who have received credit for EDU115.
  
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    EDC 205 Educational Psychology

    3 Credit(s)
    This course applies psychological principles to teaching-learning contexts, and includes a study of factors affecting learning, attention, motivation, behavior, individual differences, creativity and group interaction. Students will use theory and research to explore instructional questions and inform their practice in educational planning.  Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    EDC 210 Introduction to Community Education

    3 Credit(s)
    This course engages students in exploring teaching and learning environments outside the school setting and beyond the traditional role of the classroom teacher. Students will explore the ways in which community organizations support and augment the work of schools by providing innovative spaces and programs to ignite the imagination of children and adults about the possibilities of their own lives. Students will be introduced to the variety of community educator roles and contexts and examine issues of reciprocity and cultural competence, with links to academic work. They will begin the practice of community education by engaging in projects in field sites; e.g., out-of-school and after-school programs; community centers; cultural, environmental and social service agencies; faith-based programs; LGBT organizations. Three lecture hours per week. Requires at least 15 hours of fieldwork. Required for the B.S. in Education: Educational Studies-Community Education concentration. Prerequisite: EDC 115 .
  
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    EDC 315 Policy and Practice in Community Education

    3 Credit(s)
    This course addresses purpose, policy and socio-political contexts in community education, and their implications for practice. Students will investigate programs that support the formal and informal learning of individuals and groups in community organizations with educational missions and support the development of the community itself. They will research and analyze community needs, apply theories of community education and development to policy and programming, and reflect on their roles vis-a-vis the community and as developing education professionals. Topics include ways that community education promotes civic engagement, group empowerment and social change. 30 hours of fieldwork in community-education settings required. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites: EDC 115 , EDC 210 .
  
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    EDC 325 Program Planning and Evaluation in Education

    3 Credit(s) W-II


    This course introduces students to knowledge and practice in educational program design and evaluation in community organization settings. In consultation with community stakeholders and organizational staff, students will identify needs, plan programs that address those needs, and explore ways to evaluate program effectiveness. Course content will also include in-depth writing assignments, field-based activities, and class discussions/activities that focus on formative and summative evaluation, program impact, legal and ethical issues, sources of funding, and grant-writing. The course includes a culminating project that participants will develop for and with a community-based organization. Three lecture hours per week. A minimum of 15 hours of fieldwork is required. Prerequisites: EDC 115 , EDC 205 , ENL 110  or equivalent, PSY 218 , PSY 251 , PSY 252 , or PSY 322  or equivalent.

     

  
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    EDC 345 Directed Field in Community Education

    3.0 Credit(s)
    This course is designed to provide the student with an intensive guided experience in community education. The student will observe, assist and analyze his/her experience in an approved community education organization. Support will be provided by both an on-site professional and a Salem State University instructor/supervisor. A minimum of 75 total hours per semester of fieldwork and a bi-weekly seminar are required. 1.5 lecture hour per week. Prerequisites: EDC 115 Exploring Education and EDC 210 Introduction to Community Education.
  
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    EDC 400 Literacy Development I

    3 Credit(s) W-II
    This course focuses on language and literacy development for diverse learners from preschool to elementary school, including English language learners.  The processes involved in reading and writing development, using children’s literature in support of literacy development and approaches to teaching reading and writing will be explored.  This course emphasizes writing literacy case studies, as well as writing regular reflections to connect field observations to course concepts.  Includes 1-3 hours of field experience weekly. PrerequisitesEDC 115  or EEC 105 , and ENL 110  or equivalent W-I course.
 

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